Recommendations on a boat

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by fishinguncle, Jun 25, 2007.

  1. fishinguncle

    fishinguncle New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    South Eastern Indiana
    I am reltaively new so I apologize if the topic has been covered before.

    I am looking at purchasing a used boat. I'll be a first time boat owner.

    I was wondering if you guys have any thoughts on what would be a good used boat.. I would like a boat that is good for multiple species although I expect to use it for cats on the river mainly. Is there such a thing as a boat that won't get swamped on a big river, but that is small enough and light to be good on gas and usable in smaller bodies of water.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Keep in mind, the boat is only as worth as much as the motor on it is.
    If you take the motor off most any used boat its worth is the trailer it sits on.
    Take it off the trailer and they should pay you to haul the boat off.
     

  3. fishinguncle

    fishinguncle New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    South Eastern Indiana
    Thanks Mark...that may explain why there does not seem to be any rational for the pricing on used boats...I see some boats I think would be inexpensive and guys want a fortune....other boats I think might be expensive seem cheap...just trying to figure out what I should be looking for in a good river fishing boat.

    thanks
     
  4. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Just about any boat that floats and runs can be used or altered for catfishing with just a little ingenuity. Just make sure that the mechanics are in good shape, the hull doesn't leak, and the transom is in good shape. If those three things are good, then you'll have a good boat.

    I found a boston whaler and got a really good deal on it. It is really open with nothing in it, so it is being an easy job to set it up like I like it. The best part is it's "idiot proof"! Absulutely unsinkable, LOL. Trust me, it's been tested:smile2:
     
  5. kory

    kory New Member

    Messages:
    112
    State:
    Fairfield, Ohio
    how exactly does one test that? lol


    i have a little v bottom with a 10 hp merc on it, fine for calmer bodies and smaller rivers, but i wouldn't trust it on any water with much chop to it. My ideal river boat would be 16-18 ft flat bottom with a 20 hp motor, my ideal lake boat would be one of those kenner boats, or one with the controls in the center so you can walk all the way around it.

    like xringer said, check for leaks, and also visualize modifications that you want to do and whether or not they'd be feasible on the boat you're looking at.
     
  6. Cajun

    Cajun New Member

    Messages:
    41
    State:
    Kolin, Louisiana
    I have a Carolina Skiff 19 ft with a 90 Merc a good flat bottom boat with a center console. I like to fish big rivers and the Gulf of Mexico in shore waters , real good for catfishing and when float chasing the trolling motor keeps up well in the chase :go:
     
  7. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Also, Keep in mind that any boat you buy will always be 2' to short.
    Get a boat that you think is tooooo big and you will soon find that it ain't roomy enough.
    Also, Make sure that the motor on the boat is large enough to push against a strong current.
     
  8. fishinguncle

    fishinguncle New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    South Eastern Indiana
    Thank guys for the advice.

    I am going to the local Marina's here in Southeastern Indiana to see if I can find something that needs some TLC...I use to do autobody work when I was in college to pay for school and rent...we got a couple jobs back then from the Marina's to repair some fiberglass hulls and paint jobs on several boats....

    I don't do the body work for a living anymore, but I still build hot rods for fun. From your posts and reading, I think I could be happy with a V-hull, Boston Whaler or Carolina skiff...perhaps I can find one that is in need of some repairs...
    thanks again and I hope to go fishing with some of you guys sometime
     
  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Boats are full of compromises.
    That 2 extra feet you are supposed to be shopping for might be the 2 feet that keeps you out of some of the best flatheading to be found.

    Take the Neuse river for instance. If you fish from a catfish yacht you are out of luck. If you have a boat like JW's A big majority of the entire river you cant run in. If you have a 14 foot jon boat. You can fish most of it.
    If you have a canoe you can fish its entire length from where its a trickle to where its 6 miles wide at Minnesot.

    Some of the best flatheading are those numerous miles of river fit for only a kayak or canoe.

    You need to know where where you plan to fish.
    I've never owned a boat I thought was too short but I've owned plenty of them I thought were poorly built and poorly designed.
    There are some huge 16 foot skiffs out there and there are some dinky 16 foot ones as well. Design is important.

    If you bankfish you know what you carry to fish when you go. What you can carry.
    It doesnt take anymore to fish off a boat either.
    Most people have about twice what they need on a boat. Sometimes you just got to slim down. I've done it many times.

    Things like V bottom and flatbottom are important.
    A flat bottom or I'll say the commercially built ones will beat the snot out of you and if you dont have back problems you will.
    What makes them nice to me is it takes less engine to plane it and keep it on plane. The flat bottoms are the economy series of boats. Just learn to slow down. You'll have no choice in the matter.

    As always with boats there is a compromise. You like those deep v's with a large angled deadrise in the back.
    Its going to ride great but its going to sit bad. She is going to rock bad and the steeper angles will rock violently sometimes. Ask my ribs. I've been in the big pond enough to have experienced it. I prefer them anywhere from 6-12 degrees. Those 24's dont do a thing for me. Forget the ocean giving you sea sickness.. The boat is capable of taking care of that.
    Now that you got the Cadillac ride thing going on get ready for the big engine to get this baby up out of the water and on top of it. They aint shallow draft boats.
    Fueling will suck for both the truck and the boat now. I imagine all you'll use that big engine for is getting it up on plane. After that you'll be searching for ways to economize.

    To me its amazing what people are willing to pay for in a boat these days.
    There is alot of brand new junk out there these days to more then compliment the used junk. Inexperience can cost you alot of money either way.
     
  10. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    State:
    Virginia
    Thanks for throwing in the kayak option. I was highly opposed to ever stepping foot in a shaky kayak until I started doing my research. I found that the Angler models out there are fine boats with outstanding initial stability, unlike what I had ever seen before. The first time I actually went to a kayak demo and actually sat in one, I was amazed at how totally wrong I had been.

    http://www.heritagekayaks.com/redfish12angler.htm gives you some information on the kayak I eventually purchased.

    Here are some great reasons why you should consider a kayak:

    1. Very inexpensive for an angling craft. My entire package, all new, including kayak, vest, transport, cover, cart (all but the fishing poles and tackle) cost under $1,200.

    2. No taxes are likely charged for a kayak as would be on a trailer or motor boat. No registration fees and no extra insurance are required either.

    3. A kayak is easily unloaded and launched by one person. I can launch the kayak from a boat ramp and dock without even getting my feet wet. Other than time required to load the kayak, I can get the yak from the SUV roof to the water and be in the water within ten minutes.

    4. A kayak is surprisingly easy to paddle. If you use proper paddling techniques (such as, "Face the paddle"), you can cover the lake and make it back to shore without feeling tired. Believe me, I'm not all that physically fit.

    5. Kayaks are a joy to paddle; well, you have to experience this to appreciate it. It is no wonder that many kayakers refer to power boats as "stinkpots."

    6. Kayaks are very quiet on the water; you can approach fish without spooking them. The hulls of most angling kayaks are very quiet, and with a little practice, you can paddle quietly, too.

    7. Kayaks open great access on the water. Kayaks have an extremely shallow draft, allowing you to approach shallows, marshes, and even snags without any problem.

    8. Fishing kayaks are desinged to be stable; yes, even more stable than you might think. Native Watersports make Magic and Ultimate models that you can stand and pole. Even the Heritage Redfish that I have allows you freedom of movement that I never thought possible.

    Whatever you decide, learn the lesson that I did--keep an open mind!
     
  11. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    We in powerboats call Kayaks "Targets of Oppertunity". They are like Weebles, they just pop back up, LOL!!!
     
  12. jeremiad

    jeremiad Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,207
    State:
    Virginia
    Ha! I thought someone might have fun with my "stinkpot" comment.

    I read an article recently about kayaking hazards...of course rude boaters aiming for the hapless kayaker comes to mind. Interestingly, the writer noted that most of the hazards for fishing kayakers come from well-meaning but curious boaters who pull along side the kayaker to check out what he's doing (never having seen such a thing before, I guess).

    The boater then powers away, not realizing that his wake is going to create a disturbance for the kayaker!

    Right now, I'm sticking to waters where only trolling motors are permitted! :roll_eyes:
     
  13. xringer3

    xringer3 New Member

    Messages:
    950
    State:
    Oklahoma
    HAHAHAHAHA!:smile2: