Recommend Baits for blue catfish on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by zmoon, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. zmoon

    zmoon New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    Missouri
    Next week a few buddies and i are planning a trip to St. Charles to fish the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. I was wondering what are some recommended baits/rigs to use and where we should fish. Also, if live bait is the key does anyone know where i can catch my own inorder to save some money.
     
  2. renegadecatfishing

    renegadecatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    7
    State:
    missouri
    I would go up to the locks and throw out some jigs against it and try and get some moon eye, or if you have a good castnet the better. Live a cut shad work well.
     

  3. cross_their_eyes

    cross_their_eyes New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    Show Me State
    zmoon,

    I use a three way rig. I fish real heavy current so I use a 13 to 16 ounce sinker. I normally put on whole shad less the tail. I slice them a few time to get the scent in the water. I've heard big shad heads are good but haven't really tried them. I've been fishing fast water 6 to 9 ft. deep close to the channel usually on the outside bend of the river. Hope this helps.

    Bill
     
  4. btmfdr

    btmfdr New Member

    Messages:
    85
    State:
    missouri
    hey bill, how do you set up your 3 ways, just normal or what? if fish the missouri alot and the current usually makes a mess of the 3 ways. im getting sick of losing all my power pro from the reels, carolina rig is getting expensive.
     
  5. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I use a simpler version of a 3-way rig. I tie a dropper loop http://www.animatedknots.com/dropperloop/ about 12 to 18" long and then leave another 24" or so of line below the dropper loop. I tie a bank sinker on the bottom of the main line, then tie my hook to the dropper loop using a Palomar knot. I like this rig because it keeps the bait up off the bottom - the sinker is on the bottom but the bait is up a foot or two. I never have any problems with twisting or tangling except when reeling it in - and that's just because the shad rolls around so much in the current. When I throw it out, it doesn't tangle.

    If you're using a heavy braid as your main line, I'd suggest a mono leader, rigged as above, in a lighter weight than your main line. That way you'll lose the leader before you lose that expensive braid.

    The only drawback to the rig I use is that the sinker and hook are all on the same weight of line - a lot of guys like to use a lighter weight on their sinker so it'll break off first and save the hook.

    DougC will probably be along in a minute to explain his rig, but I'll see if I can steal some of his thunder... I like the way he does it and may switch to using that rig before long...

    He ties a swivel onto his main line, with a bead above the swivel. Then a leader of maybe 12 to 24" below the swivel with his hook on it. The sinker is tied to a snap swivel and a short length of lighter line (mabyt 6" or so), and hooked onto the main line just above the bead. The main line can slide through the sinker just like a carolina rig, but if the sinker gets hung, it'll break off the lighter line. You dont' have the same problems with tangles that a 3-way swivel causes and you can pre-tie the sinker lines ahead of time so there's less work to do out on the water.
     
  6. cpalombo

    cpalombo New Member

    Messages:
    318
    State:
    Nashville TN
    What a great story. Thanks!

    What is a noodle? Is that a PVC float or something?

    How does noodling work? Do you just float along with the baited bottles? Do they get lost? Do they stay close to you. This sounds very fun. I want to know more so I can try it.

    CP
     
  7. cpalombo

    cpalombo New Member

    Messages:
    318
    State:
    Nashville TN
    Oups, wrong thread. Sorry, I did not read before I selected the one to post on.

    err...

    CP
     
  8. dougc

    dougc Active Member

    Messages:
    1,709
    State:
    Independen
    I evidently missed this one, but here's my two cents. Marty explained it pretty good, but here's how I rig for the heavy current. Onto my 30lb mainline I thread a swivel, then a bead, then tie on another swivel. To the first swivel, I use about a foot of 20lb for my sinker dropper with a loop in the end for ease of changing sinkers. Tie on 18-24" of 40lb for a leader. If you get hung, it's usually the sinker so you can break off and only lose the sinker.
     
  9. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    I know i'm late but I really like the carolina rig. 40# main line and 50-80# leader.
     
  10. Dave53

    Dave53 New Member

    Messages:
    411
    State:
    Lonedell M
    Ive tried that 3 way rig with a small cork next to my hook to keep it up..I kept getting hung up and breaking my line so I switched the sinker line to some old 12 pound line in the bottom of my tackle box..the firs throw..snap..sinker went 60 yards hook and bait went 2..tried it again..snap same thing..next sound was the spool of line going into the trash bucket!
     
  11. cross_their_eyes

    cross_their_eyes New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    Show Me State
    zmoon,

    Make a "v" in the coat hanger. One side longer than the other and slide up a good size egg sinker. It will fit inside the whole in the sinker then bend it over so the weight can't slip off. On the shorter side bend a small loop in the coat hanger and tie on your leader and hook. You'll have to play with the right length leader. Once you get the length right you'll notice it's almost impossible to tangle the hook with your weight. Tie your mainline on the same loop as your hook and NOT the "v". There is a reason for that - your bait will stay up in the current. The downside. If you do get hung up you risk loosing your whole rig.

    Anyway, that's one rig I use.
     
  12. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    Hey guys, I was watching a catfish video three weeks ago, and I tried something I saw on there. Its basically a carolina rig, but with no leader line. Slide your sinker on the line, then a couple beads, and tie your hook on with a slip or palomar knot. Yes, the weight and beads will sit right on the hook. I thought it was crazy too guys, but i tried it and it works. Keep in mind, this is for your fast current setups. The weight on the hook doesnt bother the kitty's, and you have a direct link between your rod tip and the hook which is great for those circle hooks. As well, I dont seem to get hung up nearly as often for some reason. The gentleman on the DVD said this method controls your bait much better and prevents it from "helicoptering" which is a problem with three way rigs. He indicated that the catfish struggle to "catch" the bait when you have a leader in fast current, as well it doesnt appear natural. I caught 4 blues last week betweenn 10 and 16 pounds all on this rig. I'm still testing it out, but I can tell ya it sure worked on those fish. I had four good rips, and four fish in the boat. Cant ask for better than that. yall give it a try and let us all know what you think. It seems to work. He stressed this is a fast current set up and wouldnt work for slack water. Hope it helps a little.
     
  13. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Sounds like a basic texas rig with beads. I wonder though how it will do with bigger fish when they get to rolling. Hmmmm tell ya what I'll start rigging a pole that way.
     
  14. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    Yes Josh, you are correct. Rig it Texas style. Let us know how it works for you. I havnt thought about the rolling. But, one could always use a heavy monofilament leader and still put the weight at the hook. I might try that.
     
  15. Hannibal Mike

    Hannibal Mike New Member

    Messages:
    1,454
    State:
    Hannibal, MO
    I like the use of a lighter weight line to the sinker too. Breaking 50 lb line or stronger can be tough! Mono keeps stretching and Power Pro is tough to break. The sinker line strength depends on the weight you will use (da) as well as how you cast. If you are fishing from shore or cast 40+ yards, the line needs to be about 10lbs of strength for each OZ of sinker weight. 20lb line for a 2oz sinker etc. This is for long or frequent casts. If you are using mono, it will fatique and break. Once on the Illinois river near Joliet, I saw a guy cast a 4oz sinker with a long rod to reach the channel. The line broke and the sinker went clear across the river striking a person on the other side! No serious injury fortunatly. Since many of us use boats, there is not a need for long casts, so lighter line than 10x1 oz can be used. In faster deep water I often use an underhand toss and let the line drift down. With this manner, 20 lb dropper works fine on ever 12 oz sinkers and is sure easier to break off if snagged. I have seen guys walk the length of the boat several times with 50lb mono trying to break off! Power pro requires a prayer that the sinker is caught by a sharp edged rock! Hannibal Mike