Reasons not to stock Channel Catfish in a body of water?

Discussion in 'Channel Catfish' started by mikesmoff, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. mikesmoff

    mikesmoff New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    New York
    Where I live in NY someone illegally stocked Channel Cats roughly 10-15 years ago, so I now have a "classic" small catfish river within a 20 minute drive from my house (a unique opportunity in the area. Haven't hit it yet-will update).
    My question is why a State Environmental Organization- the DEC in NY in this case- would not stock Channels in suitable waters?
    Other than the obvious invasive species angle (that is understandable but a bit absolutist- around here they stock the hell out of waters that would not have any trout population without the stocking- in those cases they really are technically invasive- but I 'aint complaining).
    Do they reproduce too much too quickly?
    Just trying to figure out any possible reasons for opposition to their introduction.
    Thanks for letting me draw from the well of the knowledge here!
     
  2. USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT

    USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT New Member

    Messages:
    3,020
    Don,t know why NY don,t stock em,here in PA they stock them very heavily.You don,t hear much about it like the trout,but if you look online you see they stock em good.:big_smile:
     

  3. kydsexy

    kydsexy New Member

    Messages:
    1
    State:
    connecticut
    working with the CT DEP for years, i can give you one of the best reasons of trout/bass/pike vs. channel cats. the first 3 are easy to catch, table food, and people have known about them in a positive aspect their entire lives. catfish are frowned upon by the non fisherman. ever take a friend out and watch the shock he has when he has to take a catfish off lol, electrical whiskers, venomous spines, and no scales! what kind of fish is that?! lol it's the appeal to the human eye that allows the typical stockings to not be the Almighty Catfish!
     
  4. mikesmoff

    mikesmoff New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    New York

    Doesn't seem to bother the Southerners, they've got pay lakes filled with cats all over!
    An interesting point you present, though- maybe a little PR about how great they fight and taste, along with the fact that they aren't usually (I said USUALLY) that hard to catch could change things in that respect.
    Hmmmn..
     
  5. USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT

    USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT New Member

    Messages:
    3,020
    Bad news.They got paylakes all over the North too.Puddle fishing pissheads are always challenging me to come and show em how it,s done.They keep turning down my offer to come shoot fish in my bathtub for 1/2 price.HMMM.:wink:
     
  6. mikesmoff

    mikesmoff New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    New York
    So kydsexy, do you know if there is any consistent risk of overpopulation in the "average" body of water?
    Thanks!
     
  7. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    There aren't very many lakes here in Michigan with good populations of channels, but the DNR does plant them in some. I live near one, and am very happy for it. I heard on a catfishing video that a quality bass or walleye water will have 20-30 pounds of fish per acre, while a quality catfish water can have 200-300 pounds per acre! They have set up a nice balance in the lake near me, the lake is crawling with channels which are generally not heavily fished (great for me) and they don't seem to be eating all the "game fish", being at the top of the food chain in this lake. Every couple of years they put in more 8" channels, but the population is already booming in this lake. Just a couple miles away is the Grand River, which has Flatheads, but I'd rather those stay out of this lake though. It would take nature a while to sort the balance back out if Flatheads started gobbling up everything that swam. Already someone (or possibly a bird with eggs clung to its legs) got carp into that lake, and those things now have a large population, but they don't eat game fish, so they don't bother me too much.
     
  8. Gotbuck

    Gotbuck New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,078
    State:
    Missouri
    What do the water temps get up to in your area? The reason may not be overpopulating but under populating.

    "All of our major catfish species spawn during spring or summer when the water warms to an optimal temperature. Channel and blue catfish spawn at 70 to 84 degrees, but 80 to 81 degrees is considered best. Flatheads spawn at 66 to 75 degrees." - Game and Fish.

    http://www.gameandfishmag.com/fishing/catfish-fishing/RA_0606_06/index.html
     
  9. recordbreakin1

    recordbreakin1 New Member

    Messages:
    746
    State:
    texas
    I don't know why but I'm sure they have their reason's.