Range finders - Most helpful items when bowhunting

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by wolfman, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,227
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    I have found that one of the most helpful items when bowhunting is a range finder. Not only does it help take some of the guess work out of judging distances to get that good shot placement but it will keep you from getting board when nothing is going on in the woods. I find myself ranging every stump,tree,log and rocks in my shooting lanes and along the deer trails where my stands or ground blinds are. When that deer does come in on the trail, I have already made a mental note at what distance that deer is at when it passes a tree that I have already ranged previously. It has definately made me a more successful bowhunter.
     
  2. stoney

    stoney New Member

    Messages:
    178
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    sounds like a good idea i'll have to take that to the woods with me.
     

  3. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    That's a good idea, Wolfman, and sensible. I don't bow hunt, but I do the same thing for rifle hunting; one of my box blinds sometimes offers shots out to about 400 yds, my rifle is zeroed at 200, and I know where the 300, 350, and 400 yds marks are, so if I decide to take that long shot, there won't be any guess work involved. Helps make for a clean kill, because if I'm not certain of a shot, I won't take it, seen too many deer crippled that way.
     
  4. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    Wolfman I'm surprised someone else has discovered my secret technique.There are a lot of benefits to ranging every stump ,rock and tree.For instance I have been busy ranging a stump and have had large bucks walk right on by because I didn't want give up my solid position for ranging that 484 yd stump.I made up a chart covered with acetate that showed the position and range of everything within 500 yds of my stand.Cant tell you how many shots I have had to pass up because I was busy trying to figure out exactly where the large buck was in relation to the nearest landmark on the chart.The biggest benefit of all though is when I do take a shot and miss and hit the stump ,rock or tree I know precisely how long that shot was.My friends never question me now when I say "I got buck fever and missed that big ole 8 pointer but I drilled that old burnt stump at 426 yds"They treat me with alot more respect now because they know how scientific I am and they never question me down at the local rod and gun club.Not shooting at all those deer has also saved a lot of wear and tear on my rifles not to mention extended barrel life and reduced cleaning requirements.Next season Ill have my digital camera with which I can download pictures of the buck to my laptop which will have the latest satellite imagery,and by placing the cursor on the buck get precise latlongs to his position.That way Ill be able to shoot a rock or tree in real time.I imagine this is much better for bow hunters because you can walk out there and tell your friends as you retrieve your arrow from the stump."Boy that new pin sight is dead on I held for a 46 yard heart shot and that arrow is plumb dead center of the stump.An arrow is much more impressive that a simple little bullet hole.JUST KIDDING no critcism intended LOL
     
  5. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,227
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    LOL, not at all, Ive had some perfect misses that Im proud of.
     
  6. jrm11

    jrm11 New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    Fairmont, W Va.
    RANGE FINDERS are the most important assest in the woods while hunting.

    Here's something for you all with those range finders...

    Go to your brand of ammo and print out the ballistics chart for barrell length, grain bullet, etc. it''ll give you precisely the ballistics for your gun.

    i.e 3 inch low 200yds. that kinda of thing

    I learned this in the service and found it's a valuable key to precise shooting.
    i've shot groundhogs head clean off 500 yd. 30-06 nothing to it, lol.

    Also while bowhunting watch that movement with range finding everything.
    got caught and a 140 class buck was laughing on his way :cursing:
     
  7. nosnag

    nosnag New Member

    Messages:
    284
    State:
    Florida
    To cut down on movement I went to my favorite computer store and got a couple of packages of 1" stickers and a asst. of colored felt tip markers that correspond to the colors of my pin sights.When I put up my stand I range my lanes and put the dots in the nearest tree or object and color it with the pin color for that distance.Do that in all your lanes and you only have to match the color when the game comes in.Keeps down on a lot of shuffleing around.I find it even helps more when I'm using a ground blind.It has helped me when I only had a chance for a passing shot.
    Good hunting..Bill
     
  8. Big Country01

    Big Country01 New Member

    Messages:
    964
    State:
    brandon,florida
    i have mixxed feelings on range finders i don't oppose them so don't get me wrong i just feel that it takes some of the skill and sport out of the hunt but on the other hand it helps to take misjudged yardage on a shot and getting a bad hit...