Raising worms.

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by gadzooks, Dec 6, 2005.

  1. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    I've been thinking about raising worms for fishing. While worms aren't my primary catfish bait, I do use them. Also fish a lot during warm weather for big bluegill on a lake that's too full of hydrilla to use spinners or other artificials for the gill, so use meal worms to catch them. But, the mealies get expensive after a while. So, thinking about raising my own worms. Any good sources for some starter worms? Since it stays pretty warm in the Houston area, now seems as good of a time as any to start and be ready for Spring.
     
  2. malaki

    malaki New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Redmon Illinois
    meal worms are easy too raise. just use a gallon icecream bucket, fill it with cornflakes cereal, a few chunks of potato and a hand full of worms and let nature take its coarse. just dont freak out if you see beetles in there they are the adult that lay the eggs.
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Just do a search of the web on raising mealworms, and you'll find all the instructions you'd ever want.
     
  4. T-Bone

    T-Bone New Member

    Messages:
    1,125
    State:
    South of Dallas
    Start a compost pile and the worms will come.
     
  5. Ravensmavsfan

    Ravensmavsfan New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Cincinnati,OH
    Try this, get a big rubermaid bin and fill it with dirt and dead leaves. Put a hole in the bottom for drainage. Feed the worms fruit and vegetable waste: apple cores, onion scraps, or orange peelings. Keep it between 40 degrees and 60 degrees. Probaly a basement or gargage. Change the dirt in the bin about 3 times a year.

    Just buy worms from a nursery or buy the bait nightcrawlers.
     
  6. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
  7. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    thanks whistler for that link. I already printed off the worm bed post and now will search out the rest as time permits. :)
     
  8. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Whistler, thanks for the link. I'd alread done a bit of searching on the web, but always find that folks here have something good to add, sometimes a better way to do something. Probably going to start with meal worms. They're my preferred bluegill bait and I catch some good eater channels on them also.
     
  9. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Your welcome. There is a lot of good info within those pages. Lot's of good projects from the best engineers in the fishing industry..... Our members!!
     
  10. jrm11

    jrm11 New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    Fairmont, W Va.
    I've always went out at dark after a good rain and caught more nightcrawlers then you could shake at with a stick ! can filla coffee can up with in an hour
     
  11. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    My soil is sandy or heavy clay. Worms prefer loamy soils. Also, my trees are mostly pines, think that's too acidic for most worms.
     
  12. pendog66

    pendog66 New Member

    Messages:
    2,121
    State:
    Brookville OH
    Its really easy to raise nightcrawlers. You get a foam cooler. Meijer has worm bedding like 5 pounds for 4 bucks. Your dampin the bedding and mix in some leaves and grass. Or buy worm food from meijer. When you have it set up just wait on the next rain and go outside and catch them . And if you keep the container outside on a porch or in the garage just toss a few ice cubes in and that will keep them cool. And thats all you need to do to have a nice batch of nightcrawlers for the summer.
     
  13. the_nis

    the_nis Member

    Messages:
    360
    State:
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    When I was in grade school, we did an experiment with what food would produce the fattest nightcrawlers. By sprinkling chicken feed on the top of soil 2-3 times a week, the worms got HUGE! Not sure if this will help anyone...
     
  14. daystarchis

    daystarchis New Member

    Messages:
    11,521
    State:
    Clovis Cali
    I got me a lil compost pile going and brought out a cup full of the fattest redworms you ever seen Friday to fish. I throw a lot of my garbage in there. I do not buy worms. ;)
     
  15. willisjj

    willisjj Guest

    We started raising our own worms about a year ago and being in Arizona at that time, we knew we had to raise them indoors. We got one of the large rubbermaid containers at Wal-Mart and then a smaller (shorter) one to set it in, for drainage purposes. I cut or drilled a 1/2 " hole in each corner of the larger container and used some window screen type mesh to place in the bottom, so I the water and such would drain, but the dirt would stay in. I then placed a few small boards in the smaller one to maintain some kind of clearance between the two containers and on top of that I placed the larger container. I was now ready to add bedding and worms.

    I wasn't sure what to use at first, so I started out with plain potting soil from wally world. If you use this potting soil (which I don't recommend now), make sure you get it plain, with no fertilizers and such. I filled it about half way up with the soil and then everytime I bought worms, I would buy an extra to dump into my new "worm farm".

    As far as food goes, I started out with coffee grounds and corn meal as well as adding some very finely crushed egg shells and the occassional watermelon or cantaloupe rind (completely buried). As long as they are well fed and watered, they breed at an astonishing rate. You should keep the soil wet enough so that if you pick up some in your fingers and squeeze, you should get just a drop or two of water. This dirt should be changed probably about every 6 months as eventually, if not ever changed, it could poison your worms.

    After a little experience, I switched from the potting soil, to peat moss. You can buy a 5 or 10 pound bag at wal-mart for not very much. I am very happy with the peat moss. It holds the moisture well, which means less watering and it doesn't "pack down" like the dirt does eventually, which means better airation (sp?). Anyway, I also switched from my own worm food to something called "Magic Worm Food", which is very cheap, can be found at some Wal-Marts, Sportsmans Warehouse and some other places and the worms love it. I just sprinkle it all over the top of the peat moss and have to feed them almost daily as they eat that stuff up! If I happen to run out though, I mix coffee grounds (with filter) and corn meal and egg shells up in the blender and grind them as fine as possible and use that, but they do like the Magic Worm Food better.

    Don't know if I missed anything here, and I am sure there are other people that have a better system than I do, but this seems to work for me and if you have any questions, just holler!
     
  16. chubbahead

    chubbahead Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Ohio
    I used to go out to the parks and catch them all the time when I was younger. I wonder what people thought I was doing crawling on my hands and knees with a flashlight.

    We always put the used coffee grounds in a section of the backyard. That's where the biggest and most nightcrawlers would be.