quick lead melting ??

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by bnt55, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. bnt55

    bnt55 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Northern KY
    Will a coleman camp stove melt lead for pouring weights or do I need more heat??

    Thanks
    Bill
     
  2. rrssmith

    rrssmith New Member

    Messages:
    3,059
    State:
    Bakersfield
    i melt small amounts on a coleman camp stove, i never tried a large amount yet. I worry about how much heat the old stove can take( it is a old pump style )
     

  3. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Fish/Turkey Fryer works great if you have one. Just get a cast iron pot to put the lead in and you are good to go.
     
  4. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

    Messages:
    1,602
    State:
    Texas
    Bill,
    welcowe to the boc and you can melt smallamounts on the colman
     
  5. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    Stoves, turkey burners, and bbq's will all work. Honestly they aren't very good unless you are in a garage or in a totally windless area. You will find if you have any wind the ladle, lead, and mold are hard to keep consistent in holding heat.

    Ya wanna know the best home way of doing it ?...buy a $20 single top oven burner. They stay consistent and work the best to me.

    I open my doors, turn on fans and pour on my kitchen stove. Keep it ventilated well and keep all kids and pets far away.

    -Jim-

    Hope this helps
     
  6. whisker maniac

    whisker maniac New Member

    Messages:
    2,712
    State:
    arkansas
    I've melted lead on the kitchen stove, on a fish frier, and even in a coffee can on an open fire.

    Lead melts easy but it depends on how much you have to melt as to how fast it will melt. If you have one big chunk of it it might take a while to melt it on a standard fire and the propane turkey/fish fryer will work better/faster.
     
  7. JimmyJonny

    JimmyJonny Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,059
    State:
    sc
    I agree , it does take longer using a big chunk on a stove. A way around that is to use a few smaller pieces first....If you have the choice.

    Once the smaller amount of lead melts drop in the chunk....it will melt fast. Dropping one large piece will take a lot longer.
     
  8. bnt55

    bnt55 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Northern KY
    thanks, I used a coleman stove today and it seemed to work pretty well.
     
  9. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    I use an old Coleman gas stove. It burns HOT. I use a heavy duty sauce pan that has a spout. It takes awhile to melt but once its hot enough it melts fast. Like was said small pieces work best.
     
  10. Spider

    Spider New Member

    Messages:
    610
    State:
    Hamburg, PA
    I don't know what the prices are now but even if you can find a used on cheap, the Lyman Lead Furnaces work great. Mine holds 20 lb of lead and is a bottom pour. There is also a LEE in 10 lb. These can be found at better places that sell firearm reloading equipment.
     
  11. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    I use a coleman stove to keep the lead at pouring temps. But, I initially melt it with an oxy/acetylene torch. It only takes a minute or so to melt it. The stove will keep it In liquid form. Dump all the lead you want to use in the pan, turn on the stove, and wave the torch over it till it's melted. Don't put any more lead in the pan till you're finished with whats already in it. Lead has a nasty habit of popping like bacon grease if you get trash or especially water in it.
     
  12. waynesburgjay

    waynesburgjay New Member

    Messages:
    1,960
    State:
    Pennsylvan
    I like the coleman stove for melting and cleaning wheel weights to make into ingots.