Question on Rivets

Discussion in 'Boat Modification Journal' started by Spider, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. Spider

    Spider New Member

    Messages:
    610
    State:
    Hamburg, PA
    I've never done this but it looks like I'm going to need to now. I have some rivets that are points of small leaks. I understand the concept of resetting but which side of the rivet do you put the block against, the rounded head or the stem that goes through the aluminum?
    I'm thinking you would hit the side that is inside the boat but it wouldn't be the first time I was backwards.
     
  2. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    I doubt that it makes any difference.

    When rivets are set initially, they use an air hammer with a concave tip that fits the head of the rivet on the outside, and buck the rivet from the inside.
     

  3. Houdini

    Houdini New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Maryland
    If only 1 rivit 's leaking, no problem. Knock out 1 rivit from the other side or your boat, so whatever water leaks in, will have a way to get out !
    I've used alumaloy from TV to repair my bad ones. Worked just like on the comerical. Good luck
     
  4. ouachita

    ouachita New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    Texas
    You will want to hit the rivet to tighten it from the outside of the hull. Have someone inside the boat holding a sledgehammer head or some other heavy piece of metal against the rivet tail and tap the head from the outside. It shouldn't take to much to start to flatten the tail and tighten it up. I did this on every rivet on my boat and used an air hammer with a chisel with a concave tip that I ordered from a aircraft supply website.
     
  5. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Hit it lightly.Just enough to do the job as you may need to expand it again later.

    Pounding and winter freeze with water in the boat causes most leaking rivets.I found this out by year round use of boats and our few freezes in my 50+ years of Aluminum boat use in the South East USA.It only takes a small amount of water to freeze bust a imperfection in a weld or loose a rivet.

    Walking around in a boat out of the water can also cause leaks.

    Aluminum is a conductor.Moisture in/on aluminum will be freezing way faster than on most surfaces.It will also warm up quicker.

    About rivets.Just any rivet for replacement may not do.Boats and rivets are often made of different alloys.These alloys can and often do expand and contract at different rates.Their is also corrosion resistance compatibility to consider.Get your rivets from your boat Manufacturer if at all possible.I learned these things the hard way by using the WRONG rivets.I learned why they worked out wrong from the boat and rivet manufactures.

    I love you Brothers and Sisters.peewee