Question for Catmatt or anyone else

Discussion in 'LOCAL ILLINOIS TALK' started by stickusmc, Jul 8, 2008.

  1. stickusmc

    stickusmc New Member

    Messages:
    222
    State:
    Glasford, Illinois
    i was wondering if the suicide rig you mentioned in your seminar video would work in Powerton Lake. Lots of current and rocks I was thinking about trying it this weekend, seems like it might work just want to get your thoughts.
     
  2. FlatCatMan

    FlatCatMan New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    Illinois
    Just keep in mind the new regulations that say you cannot catch your bait in a pond then take them somewhere else. New rules trying to cut down on the VHS disease.
     

  3. Slick Skin

    Slick Skin New Member

    Messages:
    184
    State:
    Charleston ILL.
    I'm going tomarrow.....I guess a guy will have to get his bait where he fish's ........I wonder what they will think of the hand size goldfish I'v got......them was some nice fish over on Matt's site you had....I'm going to Shelbyville tomarrow up the river....
     
  4. IL_CATFISH

    IL_CATFISH New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Illinois
    I dont know that this st't is true. I just cant find the documentation that states we are unable to transfer bait from one body of water to another. I've looked all through the regs and found nothing. Please let me know if you find anything.

    http://dnr.state.il.us/fish/digest/digest.pdf
     
  5. stickusmc

    stickusmc New Member

    Messages:
    222
    State:
    Glasford, Illinois
    Anglers, boaters and aquaculturists in Illinois face new emergency regulations following the discovery of a deadly fish disease in state waters.
    The Department of Natural Resources unveiled new statewide regulations Wednesday after rock bass and round gobies from Winthrop Harbor in Lake Michigan tested positive for viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS).
    VHS was first detected in the Great Lakes in 2005. Although the disease is not known to be a threat to humans, VHS has triggered numerous large fish kills involving muskie, walleye, drum, yellow perch, gizzard shad and other species. Most recently, VHS was traced as the source for a large die-off of gobies near Milwaukee.
    The infected Illinois fish were sampled June 10-11, and test results arrived June 25. Emergency rules are in effect for 150 days, after which permanent regulations will be enacted.
    “Hopefully we can slow down the spread of this disease,” said Steve Pallo, DNR head of fisheries. “VHS impacts almost 30 species and all different sizes and age classes of fish, so we couldn’t just wait and see what happens and hope it goes away.”

    Effective immediately, anglers and boaters face the following requirements:
    • Eliminate all natural water from equipment when leaving a body of water.
    • Empty and drain all bait buckets, livewells, bilges or any other compartment capable of holding natural water when leaving a body of water.
    • Use wild-trapped fish as bait only in the waters from which those fish were caught. In other words, you no longer can haul green sunfish or bullheads from a farm pond to Powerton Lake in hopes of catching flathead catfish.
    • Do not transport VHS-susceptible species that still are alive. That means you’ve got to drain your livewell and make sure any fish you’ve caught are dead before you head home.
      Here’s a list of 29 species considered VHS susceptible: black crappie, bluegill, bluntnose minnow, brown bullhead, brown trout, burbot, channel catfish, chinook salmon, emerald shiner, freshwater drum, gizzard shad, tiger muskie, lake whitefish, largemouth bass, muskie, shorthead redhorse, northern pike, pumpkinseed, rainbow trout, rock bass, round goby, silver redhorse, smallmouth bass, spottail shiner, trout-perch, walleye, white bass, white perch and yellow perch.
    Anglers also are advised to wash their hands after they handle fish and to cook thoroughly any fish they eat. Signs of VHS in fish include severe bleeding or hemorrhaging, bulging eyes, anemia, bloated abdomens and unusual behavior.

    Emergency regulations also impact stocking and transport of fish in Illinois.
    All fish imported from Great Lakes states - Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York - must be certified as VHS-free. And all 29 susceptible species listed above must be certified as VHS-free regardless of from where they come.
    Those regulations will impact fish-stocking plans for this fall, said Steve Shults, the DNR’s aquatic nuisance species program manager.
    “If you want to stock fish this fall, your easiest way is going to be to buy them from someone in Illinois who is already raising those fish,” Shults said.
    Because the Illinois River is a natural conduit for the disease from Lake Michigan, additional testing of fish from the LaSalle area is underway. Results should be available within two weeks
     
  6. littleman

    littleman Active Member

    Messages:
    540
    State:
    Illinois
    Wow I had no idea about the new regulations. Thanks for the info
     
  7. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    Thanks for the update and the good advice. This info could keep alot of people out of trouble.
     
  8. IL_CATFISH

    IL_CATFISH New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Illinois

    Wow, what a pain in the arse!
     
  9. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

    Messages:
    1,602
    State:
    Texas
    it would realy be a pain if you lost all you fish to this
     
  10. IL_CATFISH

    IL_CATFISH New Member

    Messages:
    248
    State:
    Illinois
    It would be nice if they could try to isolate the affected area and not a five state area.
     
  11. stickusmc

    stickusmc New Member

    Messages:
    222
    State:
    Glasford, Illinois
    with the budget cuts there is no way they will do anything besides wait for it to fix it self
     
  12. tbirdbassr

    tbirdbassr New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    illinois
    Well at least were not as bad as MN. I fished a bass tourney up there in 06 and my boater was crawling under the trailer before we took off!! I asked him what was up and he said 1 weed could cost $250. Better keep the waters clean they are SACRED!!!