Question About Keeping Bait

Discussion in 'Livewell and Bait Tank Review' started by Jaylake_21, May 20, 2008.

  1. Jaylake_21

    Jaylake_21 New Member

    Messages:
    111
    State:
    Texas
    I went fishign the other day and had a dozen minnows left. I came home, and put them in a 5 gallon bucket hoping to save them for this next weekend. I had a pump from an old fishing aquarium that i put in the bucket. I added some water and also used some chlorine remover that i use in my fish tank. I woke up this morning, and they were all dead. Now, I know for a fact that the bucket was clean. I know that the water was ok because of the chlorine remover that i added to it. So, can anyone tell me what im doing wrong? I have read some of the other articles on here about keeping bait, and it seems like im doing everything right. I also have an extra 25 gallon aquarium sitting empty. Could i add water to it, let it set up 2 weeks, and put bait in there to keep them alive. I always seem to buy to much bait, and i hate dumping 3 dozen minnows into the lake.. Any help would be greatly appreciated.... :cool2:
     
  2. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    A couple things may have been the issue. IMO Do you have to give the Chlorine Remover some time before you add the fish? I am not an expert and don't know that for sure but I was thinking that was the case. I don't have to use the stuff now and it have been several years since I did.:big_smile:

    What I think may have been the deciding factor in the fate of you bait, shock from the difference in water temp. I am sure the water from the tap would have been colder than the water in your bait bucket (or what ever you brought them home in). If there was a fair difference in the water temps, the shock from the difference could have been what killed them. Think of jumping into a cool stream of water on a hot summer day. :eek:oooh::crazy::smile2: I have killed a lot of bait in the past by doing this and not letting the water acclimate first.

    Neither of these may have been the case but its my best guess if the bucket was clean and the filter you put on them was in working order.

    You can find lots of good info on keeping bait in the BOC Library: BOC Member Library

    Hope this helps:big_smile:
    David
     

  3. Mr.T

    Mr.T Active Member

    Messages:
    2,554
    State:
    MO
    NEVER EVER EVER EVER DO THAT!!!!

    Dump your unused bait on the shore or in the trash, not in the lake or river.

    That's how non-native invasive species get spread around.

    Imagine if - somehow - a few asian carp fry accidentally ended up in your minnow bucket and you dumped them in your lake...
     
  4. Big Dav

    Big Dav New Member

    Messages:
    1,016
    State:
    Southwest
    Marty,

    Thanks for making that point. I completely forgot to mention that.:eek:oooh::big_smile: I have seen guys do that around here and have mentioned it to several of them and they just don't seem to give a crap.:angry:
     
  5. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    They may have been stressed to the point of death before you ever got home with them. Life in a minnow bucket ain't no bowl of cherries, and bait minnows aren't all that tough to start with.
     
  6. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Maybe your bait was just old and it was just there time to go. I'm going to say it was probably ammonia build up that killed them. I don't know what kind of pump you had running but. The smaller the bubbles the better. You also have to remember only so much body mass can fit into a body of water. Now I don't know how many minnows you had but top that off by not supplying them with enough oxygen and an ammonia build up, kind of spells death. Also assuming you did not have a full 5 gallons of water in your bucket.
     
  7. MSgtCatfish

    MSgtCatfish New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Alabama
    A few notes on how I keep my gizzard/threadfin shad and/or blueback herring alive when chasing flatties. Good aerator and filter. I have a nozzle to keep the water rotating and the gizzard shad "schooling", if the water and bait ain't circling it ain't good. Add rock salt (box per 30 gallons) to the water, ACR (ammonia chlorine remover), and some shad alive/keep alive (usually blue or green - whatever your flavor). The other thing to keep in mind is water temperature. If you have bait in 70 degree water and swap them to hotter or colder water by more than 10 degrees or so, it shocks the fish and could kill them. I picked these tips up from a buddy who only striper fishes and he has kept his gizzies alive for months on the back of his boat bait tank. Heck one time he drove from 200 miles from GA to AL and from all the splashing on Bama's great interstate roads, lost 3/4 of his water and the gizzies were still kickin'!

    Try this the next time you want to save some minnows and see if it works. Keep us informed.