Question About Bowfin

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by brian73, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. brian73

    brian73 New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Georgia
    While fishing the other day, I landed the Bowfin in the picture below. Are these creatures detrimental to Catfish? Will they share the same areas? Are they good for anything? They definitely are not shy when it comes to tacking bait. Thanks for any help.

    Brian
     

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  2. Catfish_Scooter

    Catfish_Scooter New Member

    Messages:
    2,055
    State:
    Tennessee
    I've never really done any research on em... but they are pretty tolerant of most every bait.:eek:oooh:
     

  3. catdaddy007

    catdaddy007 Member

    Messages:
    406
    State:
    SE Arkansas
    I don't believe they are detrimental to catfish.( No more than bass ). Yes they share the same areas. I've mostly caught them in lakes, sloughs, and ponds. As far as being good for anything, the small ones are very good catfish bait. Hope this helped.:big_smile:
     
  4. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    there real common in ga. most rivers and bigger creeks,and lakes as well have them.i know for sure you don't want them in small ponds,they'll eat anything they can fit in their mouths.baby catfish,bass,bream ect.....and they have a healthy appetite.
     
  5. brian73

    brian73 New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Georgia
    I got your PM. I'm just not allowed to respond to it yet. I live in Fayettevile off of Red Wine Rd. I have only caught one Flathead. I caught him using a live Bream in the Flint River over off of Woolsey Rd. I hope to get down your way soon to catch some more. Thanks for your and every ones help.

    Brian
     
  6. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    i used to fish at woolsey on the flint.when you can send a pm let me no and i'll tell you a few spots.
     
  7. mikey823

    mikey823 Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Illinois
    They call them Dogfish around here and I have caught many of them in the Mississippi River. I have never ate them but I have been told they are very good if prepared soon after catching them.
     
  8. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    around here they are called grinels.i've heard of people eating them,but they say their real boney.
     
  9. brian73

    brian73 New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Georgia
    I looked them up on Wikipedia. Below is the list of names for Bowfin.

    The list of local and alternate names the bowfin is known by is lengthy, but common ones include "dogfish", "mudfish", "grindle" (or "grinnel"),"swamp muskie", cottonfish and "lawyer". In parts of S. Louisiana they are called "tchoupique" or "choupique".

    Lawyer is my favorite.

    Brian
     
  10. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    They are delicious! But must be eaten hot for the best texture. No more bones than bass or cat. Very white, sweet meat. They have a tough hide and are a pain to clean though. I love catching them, they are notorious live bait stealer's, but they usually quit after dark. We find them in rivers and creeks up here. :big_smile:
     
  11. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    you are right there about the tough hide,i was gonna usem as cut bait one time,but soon figured out how tough they are.and they do slow down at night,but i've never had a problem with them stealing bait,they usually hit like a freight train,and fight on.(around here anyways)We use to fish for them with smaller rods than i use now,12lb. test,live or cut bream,now that use to be fun.i don't fish for them anymore.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2009
  12. Sumpfmann

    Sumpfmann New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Florida
    Bowfin
    (Amia calva)
    Common Names - mudfish, mud pike, dogfish, grindle, blackfish, cottonfish, swamp bass, cypress trout
    Description - The bowfin is the only living representative of an ancient family of fishes. It has an air-bladder which functions somewhat like a lung, and they are often seen near the surface of the water gulping mouthfuls of air. They are easily recognized by its flattened head; long, stout body; large mouth full of small, sharp teeth; long dorsal fin that extends along most of the back; and rounded tail. The pelvic fins are set far back on the belly near the middle of the body and the pectoral fins are low on the sides so that the overall appearance is one of three sets of fins in a row; the pectorals behind the head, the pelvics near the midbody, and the anal fin near the tail. Also, two short tube-like barbels are located near the nostrils. The body is olive-green above, shading to pale yellow or cream on the belly. Several dark brown, horizontal bars are often evident on the cheeks. Males have a dark spot with a bright orange halo, on the upper part of the tail fin. The spot is absent or inconspicuous on females.
    Subspecies - There are no known subspecies.
    Range - Found throughout Florida.
    Habitat - Prefers swamps, sloughs and pools, backwaters of lowland streams. Usually found near vegetation. They live in warm, poorly oxygenated waters that are uninhabitable to most fishes.
    Spawning Habits - Spawning generally occurs during the spring. Males clear out a nesting area among heavy aquatic vegetation. The eggs are laid at night by one or more females. The males guard the eggs and protect the young. The eggs hatch in six to 10 days and the larvae attach themselves to the substrate with an adhesive organ on the tip of their nose. The young begin to fend for themselves when about one and one-half inches long, but remain well hidden in heavy vegetation until they are about 10 inches in length.

    Feeding Habits - About 80 percent of their diet consists of fish, with crayfish being the second most dominant food item. They stalk their prey using their senses of smell and sight.
    Age and Growth - Growth is very rapid. Bowfin may grow to over three feet long and weigh over 15 pounds. Although reported to live for 25 to 30 years in captivity, bowfin seldom live longer than nine years in the wild.

    Sporting Qualities - Bowfin are caught often by sport fishermen, but are considered nuisances. Many anglers fishing for bass have been surprised to find that a bowfin has taken their lure. While it will strike topwater and deep-running artificials, it is most often caught in the spring and early summer on minnows, worms, frogs, crayfish or cut bait. It is an excellent fighter, better than some highly rated game fish.

    Eating Quality - The flesh is soft and jelly-like, but it is good to eat if prepared properly. Three methods of serving are smoked, fried as patties after dipping in egg and bread crumbs, and stewed.
    World Record - 21.50 pounds, caught in Forest Lake, South Carolina in 1980.

    State Record - 19 pounds, caught in Lake Kissimmee in 1984.


    This from Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission
    http://www.myfwc.com/WILDLIFEHABITATS/Freshwaterfish_Bowfin.htm
     
  13. katmax

    katmax New Member

    Messages:
    1,070
    State:
    griffin ga
    thanks for the facts
     
  14. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    I didn't mean steeling bait in the regular since, they always get my live bait I'm trying to catch flats on! I got to were I will only put a live gill on after dark at one spot. Its a beach when they eat all your bait before the flats start running around. lol :eek:oooh::smile2::smile2::smile2:
     
  15. Sumpfmann

    Sumpfmann New Member

    Messages:
    17
    State:
    Florida
    I've caught bowfin, one on a bream buster! Never tried to eat one. Around here they call them cotton fish.

    Surprisingly (or maybe not) there is an on-line bowfin user group:

    http://www.garfishing.com/
     
  16. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
     
  17. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    yeah i agree they're aggrivating,when your tryin' to catch cats.but here in the last 10 trs. or so i've only caught like 3,use to everytime i went out i'd catch 10 or 15.

    maybe the different textures have something to do with water temps,it sounds possible to me.i've never ate one,probably never will.:big_smile: