Prove a science teacher wrong

Discussion in 'LOCAL MISSOURI TALK' started by wayne1967, Sep 5, 2007.

  1. wayne1967

    wayne1967 New Member

    Messages:
    528
    State:
    Missouri
    OK, here's the deal. First off let me admit the I am stubborn and hard headed. My teenage daughter came home yesterday and told me that the biggest Missouri fish was the spoonbill which was stated by her science teacher at school. To my belief the largest north American fish are the white sturgeon, alligator gar and the blue cat, in that order. We don't have the white sturgeon but we do have the alligator gar and the blue. The all tackle record for the spoonbill is 139 pds and I think the blue is still 103 but I know there are bigger ones out there. If you noticed the last issue of Missouri Conservation mag. said the largest recorded Missouri alligator gar was 228 pounds and it has stood at that for many years.
     
  2. theonecatfishbob

    theonecatfishbob New Member

    Messages:
    4,100
    State:
    Wright City, Missouri
    I have the magazine and it did say the gar was the largest Missouri fish. But who am I to argue with a teacher. I tried that in high school and look how I wound up
     

  3. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
  4. theonecatfishbob

    theonecatfishbob New Member

    Messages:
    4,100
    State:
    Wright City, Missouri
    From the Sept.- 07 issue Missouri Conservationist Magazine. The largest known Missouri gar mount is located in the Hornersville Duck Club. This 8-foot, 3-inch behemoth weighed 228 pounds. Also stated an adult can weigh between 100 to 300 pounds. They can reach 10 feet in length although 5 to 8 feet is more common. They are restocking Mingo with these wonderful fish. I dont know if those are current numbers or they are from the distant past.
     
  5. wayne1967

    wayne1967 New Member

    Messages:
    528
    State:
    Missouri
    Not talking about an all tackle record or any tackle record just the fish itself. I believe it said that 228lb mounted fish was in Hunterville MO? I'll have to check again when I get home.
     
  6. wayne1967

    wayne1967 New Member

    Messages:
    528
    State:
    Missouri
    You beat me to it!
     
  7. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    My wife is a biology teacher and i would rather hook a snappin turtle than try to prove her wrong.
     
  8. ozzy

    ozzy New Member

    Messages:
    3,936
    State:
    Lost Wages
    http:/www.igfa.com They record all the records and might be of help.
     
  9. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    So, who's right? The MDC website or MDC Magazine?
     
  10. theonecatfishbob

    theonecatfishbob New Member

    Messages:
    4,100
    State:
    Wright City, Missouri
    uh, I dont understand the question.
     
  11. wayne1967

    wayne1967 New Member

    Messages:
    528
    State:
    Missouri
    For the last time. Not talking about any tackle records. It's how large the fish can get. The largest fish on RECORD. There's a gar in New Hamberg at a bar over 100lbs that was pulled out of a dried up slough. He would still be counted even though he wasn't caught, snagged, hogged, shot, dynamited...
     
  12. Seth

    Seth Active Member

    Messages:
    1,807
    State:
    Owensville, MO
    In order, the largest fish in North America are white sturgeon, gator gar, then paddlefish or blue catfish.

    Seen pictures of white sturgeon that are over 1000 pounds supposedly. One guy was pictured with a dead one that they said was over 1500 pounds. Biggest gator gar I have heard of was 312 pounds I think. The paddlefish and blue catfish are a close call as to which is biggest, not sure which is to say. The largest paddlefish on record is 198 pounds and largest blue is supposedly a 315 pounder from the Missouri River in the 1800's.
     
  13. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    There are bills of lading from the early 1900's that suggest their were BlueCats that weighed over 200 pounds. I'll see if I can scratch up the article.