Prop seal change - trouble?

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by Pogo, May 26, 2006.

  1. Pogo

    Pogo New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    North Carolina
    When I went out to the shed recently to prep my 2001 Tohatsu 15D2, I noticed a very small oil puddle under the foot. Checking it all day, it leaked about a drop an hour or a bit longer.

    I used this engine very little last season so it's been on the rack for 8 or 9 monhs. An aquaintance says to just run it and the seal will re-swell itself and stop leaking .... OOOoooo. k. ... a bit leery about that. Never saw a leak fix itself, they only got worse, but .... could be.

    Anyway ... anyone have an idea on the difficulty in changing out the seal and anything that might get me in over my head?

    Thanks
     
  2. Arkie55

    Arkie55 New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Mississippi
    Pogo,
    The seal probably isn't very difficult to change. Now I want you to know that I don't have any experience with Tohatsu lower units. I do however have some with Johnsons and Evinrudes and to change the lower unit seal around the prop shaft isn't all that difficult. I suggest you get a repair manual for your motor and it will give you detailed instructions on the repair. I will add that I don't think running your motor with the dripping seal will not hurt it. Just keep an eye on the oil level and repair the seal when you have time. Who knows, it could stop dripping on its own. Afterall it's a fairly new motor and shouldn't have a seal problem unless you got fishing line wrapped around the shaft behind the prop.
     

  3. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    Was the oil very dark/black, or more clear?

    When was the last time it was changed?

    Have you pulled the prop to check for fishing line?
     
  4. Pogo

    Pogo New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    North Carolina
    Thanks guys ...

    The oil is clearly lower unit lube, same light straw/clear color as new oil which it should be as I had just changed the lower unit lube before putting it on the rack.

    No, the prop's not been pulled, but none of the three times it was out last year was it in an area with fishermen. Doesn't mean a ball of line couldn't have drifted in, though, does it?

    From the parts breakdown, it appears all I have to do it pull the prop and the seal will be right there, in sight and accessible.

    You may be right and running it, at least for a while and under a close watch, might be O.K., but I think replacing the seal would be the more prudent course to take.
     
  5. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    It might seal for a little while after it warms up but upon it cooling down it will let water seep into the housing.
     
  6. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    Unless Nissan has a new way of pulling and replacing the prop shaft seal, the bearing carrier has to be pulled. The old seals removed and new ones replaced.

    I'm not sure about Nissan, but most others have back to back propshaft seals.
     
  7. Pogo

    Pogo New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    North Carolina
    I gather then, that it's a long way from a simple job, Bobpaul.

    I've built boats and repaired boats from the simple to the absurd, but I've never been into an outboard beyond simple carbs & ignitions so this is new stuff to me.

    What you describe sounds like removing/re-installing a pressed in carrier and that is not something I'd welcome doing.

    Oh, well ...
     
  8. Arkie55

    Arkie55 New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Mississippi
    Pogo,
    Removing the bearing carrier is not difficult. All it takes is a slide hammer with with the proper attachment to hook the inside lip of the carrier. At least on a Johnson and Evinrude there are two bolts through the gear case end of the carrier. Once they are removed, use the slide hammer first one side then the other to keep the carrier coming out without binding on the shaft. Only takes a few minutes to get it out.
     
  9. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    It's not that difficult and no pressing in of bearings are needed.

    The bearing carrier is removed with whatever type puller will work. It needs to grab the carrier and the screw/bolt part of the puller rests on the prop shaft.

    What holds the bearing carrier in place is a couple of small bolts or a large threaded ring. What causes it to be pulled out is a large o-ring that seals it in place.

    Once removed you poke out the seals from the inside out and tap in new ones.
     
  10. Pogo

    Pogo New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    North Carolina
    Thanks guys ... Arkie and Bobpaul? ... I feel much better and I do appreciate your time and attention.

    Looks like I just need to pull the prop, then see what I have and then make a quick trip to the auto parts store for a puller that will fit ... or, as Arkie says ... a slide puller.

    Thanks to all of you.
     
  11. Pogo

    Pogo New Member

    Messages:
    96
    State:
    North Carolina
    Done deal and ... you guys were right (plus maybe I was lucky).

    The prop had to be "worked off , but the carrier was no problem at all. Once out, there was the seal.

    Replaced it with the new one, greased up the shaft and slid it all back together in about 30 minutes total.

    I do really appreciate all you guys ... :)
     
  12. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    Your allowed to periodicly take the prop of the shaft to inspect for fishing line, and grease the prop shaft each time.:lol: