Processing hogs

Discussion in 'Hog Hunting' started by Jacksmooth, Dec 1, 2008.

  1. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    I know how to process hogs, but my question to you hog hunters out there is do you guys get some help and scald them or do you skin them out? Never hog hunted before and the guys I know who do just skin them.
    Also does the meat taste different than a domestic farm raised hog?
     
  2. swampratt

    swampratt Member

    Messages:
    217
    State:
    oklahoma
    I skin mine. The wifes grandfather scalded his .
    I have his big cast iron pot about 2.5' wide , use an A Frame or a tractor and scald half at a time.

    I do not care to eat the skin , so all that time scalding and scraping can be spent butchering...

    Have not ate wild hog yet, I'll get one someday
     

  3. gbigskin

    gbigskin New Member

    Messages:
    54
    State:
    oklahoma
    if the hog you take has a bad odor you might as well forget trying to eat it and size does not matter. if it does not stink then skin it out and process it like you would a deer. again size does not matter. about the only difference i notice is feral hogs are leaner.
     
  4. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    I don't scald mine. That just takes way too much time. I just skin mine out. Size does not matter as much as smell does with wild hogs. I have had some biguns that did not have any of that rank smell and ate good. Then I have killed little 100 lbers that were so rank it was hard enough to dress them out. I have tried butchering a couple with that rank smell, but you know its bad when the dogs don't eat it.

    Normally they eat just like a lean cut of pork. Maybe a little better.
     
  5. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    I skin mine also. Most wild hogs are pretty lean but some have a good
    bit of fat. Any fat should be thrown away, do not try to render lard out
    of it. The lard will be bitter, yellow, and not have a good smell. I try to
    wear rubber gloves when dressing a wild hog. In Alabama we have feral
    hogs but also some russian crosses. The piglets with russian blood will be
    striped like a chipmunk. The adults will be black and have longer hair. A
    hog with any russian blood may have bacteria that we have no immunities
    to. Be very careful with blood and feces when dressing wild hogs especially
    if you have a cut or open wound.
     
  6. FISHSKINNER

    FISHSKINNER Member

    Messages:
    79
    State:
    Texas
    Name:
    Mike
    I skin mine, I happen to disagree with some of these folks, I have butchered some wild hogs that stunk horribly but the meat was perfectly good. I would recommend wearing gloves while cleaning them . As for taste we always smoke the meat and to me they have the texture of a beef roast.
     
  7. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    If your going to smoke one whole it's really better to scald and scrape them. Really gives the meat a better flavor and makes it easier to smoke skin on.. Skinning them is a lot easier and you can still double wrap them in aluminum foil and smoke them. If your going to cut it up then I would definately skin it out.
     
  8. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    We scalded hogs the whole time i grew up. I skin all mine now. If you scald one and set the hair because the water wasn't quite right, it's a pain in the butt. We rendered our own lard and made cracklins in the old days but that was the old days. Never forget the day momma stepped backwards in the scalding barrle. Glad she had hip boots on.:wink:
     
  9. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    Ever try a propane or butane torch? They work great for getting the hair off that sets up.

    Thanks for the replies guys! I didnt know if any of you had ever cured the hams or anything like that where you would need to scald the hog.
     
  10. Marcos

    Marcos New Member

    Messages:
    131
    State:
    Texas
    I skin'em and process them myself.
     
  11. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    I've cured some hams before, but normally I buterfly the back straps and either cut the rest in to stew meat or use it for ground meat.
     
  12. CarolinaCatJack

    CarolinaCatJack New Member

    Messages:
    427
    State:
    Travelers Rest,
    Just take caution that you don't get into the "male parts" (if you get a boar). You bust a n**, you'll know it. The meat, to me, tastes the same as a domesticated pig, but also consider what their diet was like. A lot of greenery will give the meat a milder flavor, but if they've gotten into wild berries, bark, etc., they'll taste a little more gamey. Also, I scald mine. I don't take the time to skin 'em. Too much work for me.....:smile2:
     
  13. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    i have killed a bunch of wild hogs, and haven't come across too many bad tasting ones. the stock killers and the ones that eat dead cows and stuff are bad, i can tell you that much. i haven't ever made sausage, but recently got a grinder and have a bunch cut up for grinding, just haven't got around to it. i do mostly straight cuts, just like i do deer. i'd love to learn how to cure a ham and i am reading some on that. i have helped scrape and scald farm hogs and you can have all that. i can skin way faster with a lot less work! i think the wild ones taste better than domestic, and way leaner. up here they eat alfalfa, wheat, corn, peanuts, and soybeans. gives them a good rich flavor.
     
  14. Jacksmooth

    Jacksmooth Member

    Messages:
    574
    State:
    West Virginia
    i'd love to learn how to cure a ham and i am reading some on that.

    Pretty simple really. Mix up some salt, pepper, and brown sugar.( some only use salt and pepper and some only use salt and brown suger.) I use all three. The salt and brown sugar do the work. Pepper I have found mostly helps to keep the bugs off.

    When doing 2 hams I use 3 to 4 cans of salt, 1.25 oz of pepper, and a 1lb of brown sugar. Mix it in a tub real well working the lumps out of the brown sugar. Add a 1/2 cup of warm water and mix it up. The cure should kind of pack together and look damp. If still a little dry add some more water. Be careful. Dont get to much water in it or it will get soupy. You want the cure to cling to the ham not run off. This is why I add water.

    I then rub the surface of the ham all the way around until it starts to sweat moisture out. The ham should get a good bit colder than what it was when you started. Then I stand the ham up on the butt end with the hock or leg up. I then shove my fingers down in the hock end between the meat and the bone making a hole. Shove as much cure in as you can until it is good and tight. This gets the cure down in aroud the bone to help cure deep in the ham. Then lay the ham down with the H bone up (or the inside of the ham up). On the downard side of that bone you should be able to shove a finger in there. Inside there you should be able to feel a couple bones. Shove the cure in there until its good and tight. This also cures the ham from within. Then just coat the outside of the ham with the cure. A good even coat of about a 1/4 inch thick.

    I then put some cure or a little salt on a wide board and lay the ham on there. You can put it in an old fridge or in a garage. Anywhere it will stay about 40 degrees give or take a few degrees. Anywhere you put it make sure you put some plastic down because it will drain alot of blood and water. Also make sure whatever board you put it on that the drainage can run off and that the ham doesnt lay in it.

    Then check the ham about every 3 days for a couple weeks adding a little salt to cover up bare spots. Let the hams lay on the board for 6 to 8 weeks or a little longer if you like to drain completely out. I then get some ham nets or a old pillow case and hang the ham with the hock down to let it drain some more for about 6 weeks. After that you can take the ham down trim it and put it in the freezer. You can also let it hang til whenever you want to eat it. Just make sure no bugs get into it. Hope this helps.

    Guys thanks for all the replies. I have butchered alot of domesticated hogs. I have never hunted wild or feral hogs or butchered one and I was just wondering how or if you done it the same.
     
  15. jodster

    jodster New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    texas
    I skin my hogs, quarter them for roasts and the rest is sausage. My brother has a recipe with sage, black and red pepper and some other spices. They mix 5-10 lbs at a time and have a frying pan ready to test! I thought all feral hogs stink, some times you can smell them before you see them, but are still good eating! I also got most of them that had a lot of fat on them. I got one with hardly no fat, so I was prepared with hog fat that I got from a butcher and never had to use it! I haven't seen a single hog this year though :angry::angry:
     
  16. Kip Brandel

    Kip Brandel New Member

    Messages:
    502
    State:
    Glasgow, Kentuc
    I have taken to many hogs to count. Sometimes 15 a weekend. We skinned them ALL!!! I was working for a farmer in Florida that had hogs damaging his tomatoes and we were free to kill all of them we wanted and got paid $5 each. We donated A BUNCH of meat to needy families.
    If they live in an area with swamps they stink, If they live in an area where they stay dry and eat farmed products they don't, about 99.9% of the ones we took stunk to some extent.
    A lot of people don't like some parts but we used almost all of it. If you take the ribs and soak them in butter milk, place them in the oven/grill in a pan covered in water and cook them until the fat stops comming out making sure to keep the covered in water. Remove them from the heat and allow the fat to harden. Remove the fat from the top, remove the ribs making sure to keep the fat away from them and keep them clean, place them back in the oven/grill with the seasoning of your choice. They are pretty good, we do deer ribs the same way and they are AWSOME!!