Problem with sinkers I am casting.

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by katcaller, Apr 27, 2008.

  1. katcaller

    katcaller New Member

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    I was casting no roll sinkers this week and had this problem with some of them breaking. Can anyone tell me what the problem might be? katcaller
     

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  2. SubnetZero

    SubnetZero New Member

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    as a pure guess, maybe they cooled to fast (make them in the winter?) and they became "brittle" ...
     

  3. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

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    I have had this happen before! I think you may be letting your lead get to hot, causing the mold to get to hot and, releasing them from the mold before they can cool. Usually what I will do is let the mold cool down for a bit, this will allow the lead to cool in the mold faster.
    I have several molds so, I generally switch to another mold for a while and keep pooring.
     
  4. katcaller

    katcaller New Member

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    I believe you are on to something there Dreadnaught, I had that mold smoking, only burnt my fingers 3 times though.:confused2: I will watch that in the future. I appreciate your feedback. Katcaller
     
  5. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

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    5,444
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    Only 3 times, I usually wait till i burn mine 4 times then change, LOL!!!
     
  6. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

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    Sounds like a cooling problem. Perhaps you can remelt them and try again.
     
  7. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

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    id say you definatly had the mold too hot if it was smoking. the paper that came with my do it molds said to stop and let the mold cool when it starts smoking because its too hot and could damage the mold.
     
  8. RamRod

    RamRod New Member

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    2,047
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    Definitely the lead is too hot. When you overheat the lead it will actually become grainy like that when it cools and become very brittle due to the antimony in the lead wheel weights your using. Now pure lead won't do that. Hope this helps.:wink:
     
  9. katcaller

    katcaller New Member

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    No wheel weights, but I do believe I did put a couple of bars of solder in there b4 I realized what they were. Thanks for the input.
     
  10. catman4926

    catman4926 New Member

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    if you start useing wheel weights you really need to add about a pound of tin to fifty pounds of wheel weights also be sure to oil the heinge on your mold and your hole rods:smile2:
     
  11. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

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    14,592
    State:
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    I would agree with JW on this. He had molded a truck load of lead, and should have the operation down pat. Driving that truck load might be another subject. Agree mold to hot.
     
  12. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

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    I use Gulf Wax to remove as much tin and other impurities from my wheel weights as possible...No way will I add it to it, LOL!!!
     
  13. katcaller

    katcaller New Member

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    How does that work JW?
     
  14. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

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    After you have cleaned the slag from your lead, you simpley, drop a piece of wax (size depends on the size of the pot) into the pot and let it flame up and burn out. It is said to bring out the impurities in the lead. Then you scrape off the film that it brings up and start pouring.
     
  15. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

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    I know essentially nothing about casting wheights. I did however work for a major wheel corp. for 8 years. Has anybody used flux to remove the trash?It is a must when pouring aluminum.
     
  16. katcaller

    katcaller New Member

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    Again, I am in your debt JW, thank you.
     
  17. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

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    You owe me nothing brother, I am here to help when I can. Glad I could be of some help to you!!!
     
  18. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

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    I would think that the Flux was also used to form a protective layer over the aluminum to prevent oxidation so it could be put in a mold for billots while still in molten form. Just a wild guess there , LOL!!!
     
  19. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    the melt furnaces were 12,000 lb. units. After liguidified flux is added, then the funky mess scooped off, put in a trailor and recycled.The alum. is then poured into big ladels and poured into low pressure casting machines.Thibloy and stronium is sometimes added by the metalurigist to assure it's up to snuff.