Post your cafish sinker making tip HERE!!

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by TOPS, Jan 23, 2006.

  1. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    Mini muffen pans make ingots in useable/workable size.

    Got a tip post it!!
     
  2. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    spray Pam cooking spray on mold every 10 castings if you have a problem with sinkers sticking, when using an electric pot take a propane torch and heat the lead to help get the first initial batch melted, before you start pouring take your torch and heat up the mold also or your first couple dozen castings will cool too fast and not form completely.
     

  3. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,252
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    I heat my lead up on a coleman stove in a large ladle. To keep the lead from sticking in the molds, I just take a candle and blacken the insides before casting, they just fall out. To keep the mold hot I just set it on the ladle when the lead is melted for a min. with it open a bit and I do use the torch to get the melting process started and go faster.
     
  4. beeheck

    beeheck New Member

    Messages:
    631
    State:
    Iowa / Missouri
    I have a new split shot mold, the reusable split shot type, and when I make shot the little funnel where you pour the lead in to the cavity fills up with lead, which it should, but when I break off that funnel of lead it leaves a very rough spot on the split shot. I have tried breaking it off, cutting it off with side cutters and nothing seems to work. Any ideas? The lead I'm using is very soft, I got it off an old roof and melted the tar off it and cleaned it up. Could the lead be too soft? I hope not I only have a few hundred pounds of the stuff. I have made lead head jigs and sinkers and they seem to work just fine but the split shot is really pretty rough. Time to start making a summers worth of split shot and I would like them to be a little better quality. Thoughts?
     
  5. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    i personally have NEVER EVER had a problem with wheel weights, or anything else dirty in my pot! never had it clog up, just make sure to take a spoon and skim off all the dirt off the top, all the impurities will rise to the surface. i also never let it drain out all the way either, maybe why ive never had a clog. also as i'm pouring i keep adding as many wheel weights as lead is coming out. its not a good idea to go more than 1/2 empty because then adding lead will cool things down and take a while to heat back up. if you keep your pot full as you melt you can go non-stop till your done.
     
  6. Cutshad

    Cutshad New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Newalla, Oklahoma (Shawnee)
    Here's a great tip: Never, Never, Never put moisture in the melting pot! I made the mistake only once, and blew lead allover the place. JUST SAY NO TO MOISTURE!
     
  7. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    I have already gotten some good tips. The candle is a good tip[ blacken the mold ]

    Keep the tips coming.
     
  8. bearcat

    bearcat Member

    Messages:
    925
    State:
    Nokomis, Illinois
    Get To know your local plumbers really good. Then when they find and replace lead pipes in old homes you can get the used lead from them for a low price. The lead from plumbing and roofing is as good as it gets for pouring sinkers.

    Make sure when melting lead and pouring sinkers to be outdoors with the breeze blowing the fumes away from you.
     
  9. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    To get the best looking weights pour as fast as you can. Ive tried breaking or cutting the extra lead off but to get it pretty and smooth i think you have to file it. I was looking at some that i bought and they look like they broke them off usually the hotter they are when you break it off the eaiser and cleaner they break.
     
  10. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Depends on the mold and what you're molding, but often, once the mold gets really hot, so that the lead takes longer to cool, you can open the mold and simply lift off the part made by the pouring spout. Saves cutting or filing. Dropping those hot pieces right back into the melted lead saves a little on electricity or gas because you don't have as much heating to do to melt them.
     
  11. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    I dont know how hot your talking but Do-it reccomends not getting the molds too hot (when it starts smoking) stop and let it cool or you could damage it.
     
  12. centralcalcat

    centralcalcat New Member

    Messages:
    1,163
    State:
    Marion, TX

    Never let the molds get too hot. with mine I use a small melting pot and I let my molds sit open in between pots. Then I try to only pour 200-300 befor etaking a substantial break to allow the molds to cool.
     
  13. Big Sam

    Big Sam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,383
    State:
    Booneville AR
    Name:
    Sam
    :) On no-rolls...I take a pair of pliers and wiggle the excess back and forth to get it off instead of cutting it with diagonal side cutters...If you use the cutters you'll have to do more filing on the top....
     
  14. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Before the molds get hot enough to start smoking, it begins to take a really long time for the lead to solidify. When it gets to the point where the lead is still liquid after 3 seconds or so, I let the mold cool down a bit. I generally use at least two molds during a session, just so I can switch them out to let one cool if needed.
     
  15. nosnag

    nosnag New Member

    Messages:
    284
    State:
    Florida
    A cheap and easy way to make no rolls is to use a old tablespoon and a old serving spoon along with a package of paper clips.Put a paper clip inside the spoon with it overlapping onto the handle,and pour your lead directly into the spoon.This will be your eye for the sinker.As stated in earlier posts smoke the spoon first using the flame from a candle to keep the lead from sticking to it.I use a dowel drilled to size for the handle so as not to burn my hands when I flip the molded sinker out.I also fit a threaded nut under the handle of the spoon to level it out.
    You will get two sizes of weights this way that will fit most current conditions.They are'nt really pretty,but they work great.

    BILL
     
  16. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    This may have been posted before, but just in case....

    I began hearing about no-roll sinkers last summer, and since I fish tailraces with heavy current, I really wanted to try them out. Unfortunately, I couldn't find them in my area, nor do I (yet) have any casting equipment. Well, no-roll sinkers look similar to a flattened bank sinkers, and lead is a soft metal...

    So, just take a bank sinker, a hammer, and a flat surface (I use concrete), and go to town! It really doesn't take very long to pound a 3 oz sinker flat.

    So far, that's about the extent of my "sinker making" :)

    Here's a couple of before & after pics:
     

    Attached Files:

  17. stickthrower

    stickthrower New Member

    Messages:
    313
    State:
    Possum Kingdom Lk, TX
    I posted it on the old site (can't find it). I use various size spoons and cheap snap swivels to make my own no roll sinkers. (Factory molds call them spoon sinkers). Look at Goodwill or steal the wifes' if your brave enough. There are spoons from baby size to ladle. Been doing it for years and they work great. By using the cheap snap swivels you can make them "break away".

    I use a large swivel to connect the main line to leader, then a bead and same size swivel about the connector swivel. Sort of a "3 way slider". I then hook the cheap snap swivel to the free sliding swivel. Makes for a cheap sinker that you can afford to loose.

    They don't cost much as far as "molds" and come in many different sizes. I have some "Do it Molds" and make many different sinkers, but I like my no rolls just as well as "factory". Besides they don't cost much!

    By the way, I have been accused of being "A Cheap Ba$$urd" before, but I use what works!:)

    Frank

    Frank
     
  18. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
     
  19. canebreaker

    canebreaker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,311
    State:
    Southaven,MS
    Beeheck,

    There is a spcial cutter for cutting the spar off the sinkers. Do it molds has them. They can be found at Jann's netcraft too. Sometimes you can find them on ebay.

    do_itmolds.com
    jannsnetcraft.com
     
  20. SilverCross

    SilverCross New Member

    Messages:
    1,562
    State:
    Fairbury, Illin
    Hey stickthower, you ain't cheap. I have just been taking a wheel weight and break off each end then flaten them with a big hammer then drill a hole and put a leader through them and I use a snap on my main line and hook them for sliding sinkers. Now that's cheap, but with my luck I would get a terrible burn from liquid lead. I get in to big of a hurry when doing things like that.