Post spawn channel catfish?

Discussion in 'Channel Catfish' started by JimF, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. JimF

    JimF New Member

    Messages:
    151
    State:
    IL
    I catch my far share of cats most of the time, but I have a little trouble right after the spawn. I was wondering if anyone else has the same problem. Can you tell me where they go? what they eat? I have tried shallow, deep, brush & some days it takes hrs to pull one in ( kiss it on the lips) & put it back. It seems like 3 or 4 weeks before they are themselves again. Any help ???
     
  2. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    3 or 4 weeks.....sounds about right. same thing goes for flats, i just grin and bear it. go carp fishin':D
     

  3. JimF

    JimF New Member

    Messages:
    151
    State:
    IL
    Well from the lack of feedback I'm not the only one having problems after the spawn.
     
  4. Katmaster Jr.

    Katmaster Jr. New Member

    Messages:
    4,644
    State:
    Wilmington, NC
    Yes I have a lot of trouble with that also. Still have not totally figured it out yet. I just go after them anyway and usually end up catching a few. Usually at night in shallow water.

    Zakk:)
     
  5. Ravensmavsfan

    Ravensmavsfan New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Cincinnati,OH
    Post spawn fishing is ok for me. I do catch alot less over 5 pounds though.
     
  6. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    Yea it's a bad time of the year to fish right after the spawn, here in Ohio I consider the last 3 weeks in July a washout.
     
  7. Doyle

    Doyle New Member

    Messages:
    582
    State:
    Illinois
    I mostly fish in the warm water return of a power plant. I think the channel catfish are totally confused by this and spawn over a long time. It seems like I have caught catfish with eggs all summer long. Could this be right? That’s my impression anyway.
     
  8. comanchero

    comanchero New Member

    Messages:
    119
    State:
    Minnesota
    Post spawn here in Minnesota is usually August - September. This is also usually our lowest water period of the year and the channel and flathead fishing can get challenging. My experience has been to move from my favorite prespawn backwater fishing areas to the main channel areas that have good current. The backwater areas during this period get pretty shallow and there is little current and my experience is the channel cats move to find current and forage. The key to finding channel cats in the post spawn seems to be following the forage base. The shad schools in the main river channel seem to get easier to find during this low water time. I like to watch for white bass activity and any surface activity right at dusk ( alot of time its gar) to indicate the presence of shad. Last year you could see big shad schools just below the surface and they would dimple the water as they moved. This is the time of year to start fishing wing dams with depth and current and neck down areas with current. This is when I've caught my biggest fish but the fishing can be very slow. Many a night I have gone home skunked - which just fires me up to go again the next night.
     
  9. terrycook3

    terrycook3 New Member

    Messages:
    45
    State:
    minnsota
    i leave at about 2 am-fish until about 5-then switch over to bass-they dont feed much at this time of year-in the wee hours ssems to be best for me-use a little smaller bait-watch for light bites-they dont seem to dash off real fast during this time !-i hope this helps you-gl
     
  10. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    It is bad for most types of fish.

    They are tired from the breeding process and they do not have the hormones that drive the agressive behavior. They do not have the "need to feed" like they do before the spawn because the energy consumption is back down to a normal range.

    Thats when you have to work to catch them, and you really have to base your success on much smaller fish and smaller total numbers.