pole beans

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by wylie catter, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. wylie catter

    wylie catter Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    South Carolina
    This year I'll be trying some pole beans for the first time. So how do I need to build the poles with strings hanging down trellis things. How high and how many strings, how close together and all of that. Do the strings have to be anchored to the ground? Will the plant find the strings and climb by themselves?

    Last year my bush beans put out big time. It just breaks my back to pickem. Do pole beans put out as much?
    Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    I'm going to do mine two ways this year. I am going to plant my corn in hills and plant the beans with it so the beans will climb the corn. The other row I will put steel post at each end of the row and put the line in between. I will add post as the beans grow to keep them off the ground. I don't put any drop lines, I just run mine length ways.
     

  3. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    i plant rattle snake pole beans and kentucky wonder.they put out more than any of my bush type beans.i planted mine about 6 inches aprt,no problems.i used some string trellis i got at home depot for a dollar apeice.but i have useed string and it works great you don't haveto anchor the string.some times they find the string some times you have to start them.just wrap the string around the bean a couple of times.mine kept putting out until the cold killed them.my height was 8 foot and i had them grow all the way up and grow across the top about 3 foot,so can get 11 ft or more .GOOD LUCK
     
  4. boswifedeb

    boswifedeb USCA Jailhouse Lawyer

    Messages:
    13,922
    State:
    Tennessee
    Name:
    Debbie
    Last year we had a piece of fencing, about 20-25 feet long that we let the beans run on. We just planted them at the base of the fencing and they took care of the rest. We've got beans coming out of our ears. They were Kentucky Wonders. Good stuff! And extremely easy to grow.
     
  5. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    Did you freeze your or can them? I think this year we will vacuum seal and freeze a lot of the veggies out of the garden. I am going to plant a couple row of beans for dry beans. Any body know a good variety that bears good?
     
  6. bluejay

    bluejay Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,507
    State:
    Napoleon, Mo.
    Cattle panels and a couple of steel post works good for any thing that climbs.
     
  7. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    In the past I] have had good luck with Blue Lake Pole Beans. Great taste and big producer.[/I]
     
  8. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    oh no told me about these a few years back, listen, you cant beat this set up for beans, you pick standing up and half the time your in the shade! lol I planted blue lake pole beans and the darned things wouldn't quit growing! These livestock panels last for years too. You don't even have to put them in your garden, just find a place in the sun and plant some beans. I placed my panels with the flat sides facing east and west, got plenty of sun on the faces that way. Good luck growing.....

    ps... this pic isn't one of mine, I got it off the www
     

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  9. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Cattle panels are the way to go,,,, heck they are only 15 dollars for a 16 foot long panel,,,,,They will outlast your Grand kids,,, never rust out. If you have a Tractor Supply by you,,, check their panel piles,,,,they will always have a couple that got damaged by a fork lift,,,,lol,,, ask the manager,,,you will get those for 5 dollars apiece or less....lol Beans will climb a bent panel as good as a straight one...

    Pole beans take about 78 days,,, bush beans about 45 days,,, so if you want beans quick,,, plant some bush varieties.

    On dry beans,,, I don't see why a person could not plant his favorite dry bean with grocery store dry beans...With Soy beans most farmers save their own seed for the next year,,,, I'll bet dry beans is the same....Grocery store dry beans are cheaper than seed catalog dry bean seed.
     
  10. boswifedeb

    boswifedeb USCA Jailhouse Lawyer

    Messages:
    13,922
    State:
    Tennessee
    Name:
    Debbie
    I froze them. I've got more freezer space than cabinet space! LOL!
     
  11. wylie catter

    wylie catter Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    South Carolina
    That's a neat idea with the cattle panels.

    That would work good for a grape vine too, and just leave it out year round.
     
  12. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    The year before last,,, I planted tomato's on the panels,,,just like netman's picture,,,, darn cherry tomato's climbed 8 foot and were still heading for the sun,,, regular tomato's did great on them too.
     
  13. festus

    festus New Member

    Messages:
    7,660
    I still like the old cane pole teepee style. 3-1/2' between bean rows, can poles spaced about 2' to 2-1/2' apart in the rows. I tie them teepe about 7' high with a roll of the plastic coated wire similar to bread ties. You can get a big spool of wire for a buck at Dollar Tree. I generally trim the canes 2' above the tie, and tie some more canes horizontally as support. River cane will last 2-3 years if you take care of it, not so with bamboo. I can take my riding lawn mower up to a canebreak less than 1/2 mile away and gather all I want.

    But I have used the fence post, string method. It's a great idea, too, but not quite tall enough for me. My favorite beans are white half runner and Romano pole beans. I think pole beans taste better than bush beans, or as some hillbillies call them"bunch" beans. If pole beans are treated for bugs and occasionally sprayed with the right fungicides, they should bear till frost.
     
  14. wylie catter

    wylie catter Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    South Carolina
    I've got a bunch of old rusty box wire that I started cutting and rolling into cylinders. Making some about 2.5' wide for my cucombers to climb and some about 1.5' wide for tomato cages. I'm going to drive a metal fence post in the ground to tie each cage to. I think this will work pretty good. That made me think what if I got some metal fence posts about 8' tall and drove them in the ground every 5' or something and mounted a few rows of that old fence on them raised up off he ground about 2'.

    I don't know what I'm gonna do for beans yet, I'm still brain storming.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2010
  15. Salthart

    Salthart New Member

    Messages:
    1,264
    State:
    North Carolina
    Do yourselves a favor and try McCaslin pole beans ! THey have a great flavor and while they do have strings, those seem to come out easy as you break them. I also love Half runner beans but they are much harder to eat because of the strings we always seem to miss.

    I put up 2 4x4 posts 8 feet tall and strung two telephone wires, One at the top and one at the bottom. I paid a young person to tie all the strings with baler twine and then put up center supports.. A very wet spring followed but a short drought ruined my pole beans last year but I'll be ready this year. I hope anyway !
     
  16. wylie catter

    wylie catter Member

    Messages:
    675
    State:
    South Carolina
    I bought kentucky wonder pole beans and blue lake bush beans for this year. I use Ferry Morse seeds they grew excellent for me last year.

    I'm trying some cow peas this year also. They look about like black eye peas. When they are ready the pod turns purple. I've been told these are good, but this will be my first time growing peas. Do they just grow out like bush beans?
     
  17. Salthart

    Salthart New Member

    Messages:
    1,264
    State:
    North Carolina
    Those have a number of different names and it will be hard to tell just what you have until you shell them. Whip-o-will peas are one type, Pink eyed purple hulls is another and the list goes on.

    To me, purple hulls are the best tasting item from the garden. But a couple of warnings. Deer love them and if you plant before the 4th of July, Keep them sprayed or you will find them full of wasp larva.

    THey are a bush type plant and they are strong growers. Before they were known to be ok for humans, they were raised in the south for cattle feed. LOL What a waste. I like the bean when its shelled green but you can pick them dried. I have also heard you can pick them young and eat them as snap beans but research it to be sure.

    All the shelling is a good bit of work but these beans are some very very fine eating. Good luck with them and let us know how they turn out for you.