pier fishing ocean rig question?

Discussion in 'Bank Fishing' started by creepie-jackalope, Dec 21, 2009.

  1. creepie-jackalope

    creepie-jackalope New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Great state of Texas!
    What type of rig do I used for pier fishing on Galveston Island TX? I would guess I would use the same slip sinker, Carolina, type rig. What would you guys recommend? What type of sinker and hook would I need, and how large? Need some suggestions to help give me a good chance of catching something. Never fished in the ocean before. Thanks Fellas
    Ryan
     
  2. Swampfox.

    Swampfox. New Member

    Messages:
    1,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    get ya a few salt water tendem leaders. has barrel swivel at top, two hook branch leaders then a snap swivel at bottom. put a one oz. piramid lead on snap swivel. bait with two shrimp, or squid, suspended of the bottom. or fish bottom, i hang up usually fishin bottom off peirs. welcome to the club, by the way brother. sorry bout that. that should have been said first.:wink:
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2009

  3. creepie-jackalope

    creepie-jackalope New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Great state of Texas!
    Hey man, thanks for the info. Maybe I can catch a shark.
     
  4. Daddy Wolf

    Daddy Wolf New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Texas
    I used to use a Penn 209m baitcaster with 30 pound test line and at least a 7 foot Medium/Heavy rod. My line of choice was Berkley Big Game mono.

    I used a 4 ounce slip sinker rig and a double steel leader with snap-swivels and 2 size 8/0 stainless steel circle hooks baited with fresh or frozen cut mullet.

    I would catch bull reds on the mullet heads especially. When going for Gaftop catfish I would use the same setup but use frozen squid for bait.

    My favorite way to fish was from the beach, though. I'd take a 4 foot section of 2 inch PVC pipe and cut one end at a 45 degree angle and twist/wiggle it into the wet sand close to the water for a rod holder.

    My fave rig was the same as mentioned for pier fishing but I'd use 2 rods and reels, both 209m's on at least 7 foot Medium/Heavy rods and I'd fish during high and low tides only, most often at night or early morning.

    Very similar to bankfishing for catfish LOL!
     
  5. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    If you go with a 2 drop bottom rig as described above I would forgo buying them to pier fish unless you are using braided line or want to go with a steel 2 drop rig.

    If you have mono on your rigs all you have to do is tie a loop knot at the end of the line which you will pass through the eye of the weight then pass the weight through the loop.
    Then you tie two more loop knots above that one attaching hooks to the loops the same way.
    All you have is the cost of the hooks and the weight when you hang up and break off.

    Even if you use braid you can carry a spool of 40 pound test mono to tie those leaders on the spot or pre tie them at home.

    I use 2 drops, fish finder rigs for drum, and various forms of the carolina rig.
    For sharks of any size you need solid copper wire for leader material. Preferably making the leader as long as the longest shark you expect to catch.
    Small sharks aren't much of a problem on a stout mono leader line but when you start getting up in the four foot range solid wire is the way to go.
    Shark skin is abrasive. Their tail fins will slice right through mono.

    A 4 foot shark fight is nothing like a catfish fight. They have some moves you aint seen yet. They have tremendous power in their tails which is why when you land one you get the tail up and out of the water. It's like laying down spike strips on the highway to stop a car. They actually make special gaffs to gaff a shark with, designed specifically to gaff them behind the dorsal fin to elevate the tail.

    For the past month and half large sharks have taken me for a ride on a weekly basis.
    4 foot and up. Bull sharks, Bonnet Heads, and Lemons.
    From a stationary position like surf fishing it's like hooking into a nuclear sub.
    There comes a point very quickly where you have to decide if you want to be spooled or cut the line. Unless of course if you are geared for shark fishing. The leader is just a start. You got to have the rod and the reel up to the task.
    For 6 foot sharks and up you need alot of line capacity or a boat to run him down.
     
  6. Angling Andrew

    Angling Andrew New Member

    Messages:
    441
    State:
    wisconsin
    That's a bit like asking "what king of gun should I buy, I want to go hunting in the Texas forest". We need to know what fish you're after whiting,pompano,jacks,blues,spot,ladyfish,drum,tarpon,kings,cobia,flounder,trout, etc.
     
  7. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    A two drop rig is pretty versatile. I drum fish with a two drop if I'm using sand fleas for bait.
    For pier fishing a two drop rig is the best all around rig if you don't saltwater fish on a regular basis.
    You aren't going to jump right into something like king fishing off a pier. It takes some specialized gear and knowledge beyond what a "visitor" to the coast is going to have.
    Same goes for shark and virtually any other large type sportfish.

    Just to go pier fish and catch fish, definately the two drop.
    Only other thing I might recommend is a couple of gotcha plugs in the arsenal.
     
  8. Angling Andrew

    Angling Andrew New Member

    Messages:
    441
    State:
    wisconsin



    This is true, it is versatile, and king fishing is a sport that takes a lot of practice. But it would be easier to help him is he gave us more info.
     
  9. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Agreed.