Physics of casting into the wind

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by eggman, Jul 4, 2006.

  1. eggman

    eggman New Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Jefferson City, Missouri
    Calling all SMART folks....Ok, I have broached this subject here before and was sort of laughed off the board, was told I had too much time on my hands and so forth. But i really would like to know a few things about casting your line into the wind - the period of time when your bait and line is above water and then the period of time after your bait hits the surface and starts to descend, then the final trip to the lake bottom. I know most of ya use big ol weights so lets throw all those out right away. I basically use 10lb mono with only a treble hook loaded with a fairly hefty chunk of liver. I can get it out quite far, even into a stout wind but when it is windy I notice that my line really gets taken the direction the wind is blowing. Here are my questions:

    say I'm fishing in 20 feet of water

    1. I assume that when my bait hits the water and the line above is being blown hard to the right that this force will obviously cause my bait to immediatley descend underwater in the direction the surface wind is blowing. How deep is water affected by wind? It is plain to see on the surface as waves, whitecaps, etc are the result of wind. Now lets say my bait is 10 feet down is the drift nuetralized or not?

    2. On another rod I use a larger treble N0.2 with an even more massive hunk of liver. This rod is spooled with 30 lb high vis greeen mono but still with no sinker. Does the heavier line get blown the same as lighter line? Or maybe the larger circumfrence of the heavy line picks up more wind because of surface area? Or does the heavier weight of the line cut down on the wind affects.

    These questions keep me up late some nights, any help would be welcome...


    egg
     
  2. samh

    samh New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Damascus,Arkansas
    the bigger the line the move it gets moved by current or wind.

    Physics of throwing into the wind with a baitcaster:
    Light weight X stong wind = backlash
     

  3. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    I had more problems throwing braid into the wind then mono line! Other then that, not that much of a problem!
     
  4. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
    I agree with that 100%. LMAO
     
  5. dcaruthers

    dcaruthers New Member

    Messages:
    756
    State:
    Alabama
    I believe surface area has a lot to do with wind drag. The larger your line (baits/weights being the same) the more drag it will have in the wind. If you want to negate the wind once the bait hits the water, then use heavier weights. If you do not want to use weights, then I would suggest sticking with the lighter lines.
     
  6. kccats

    kccats New Member

    Messages:
    634
    State:
    Olathe, Kansas
    Several things wrong here....

    1) treble hooks
    2) Chicken liver
    3) No weight
    4) Light line
    5) Lack of stress tabs

    Solution...
    1) Big Circle Hooks
    2) Big hunks of shad or whole live bait
    3) 12 to 15 ft rod
    4) Bigger line, the bigger the better
    5) 3 to 10 oz sinkers
    6) Don't need stress tabs now, you got er covered
     
  7. janton311

    janton311 New Member

    Messages:
    654
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    I'd try a sinker..:smile2:
     
  8. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    You asked five questions, and while keeping in mind the restrictions you are fishing under, here are the answers.

    How deep is water affected by wind?
    That depends on the speed of the wind, and how far the wind is traveling across the water. If the wind has a good distance to blow across a body of water it can be several feet.

    Now lets say my bait is 10 feet down is the drift nuetralized or not?
    No. The line at the surface is still being moved, so that means the other end is being moved too.

    Does the heavier line get blown the same as lighter line?
    Test strength has nothing to do with it, but line diameter does. 50 pound mono will have more drag than 15 pound mono.

    Or maybe the larger circumfrence of the heavy line picks up more wind because of surface area?
    Yes.

    Or does the heavier weight of the line cut down on the wind affects.
    No.

    The bottom line is that all of this can be changed by changing the parameters under which you fish, i.e. line diameter, weight of sinkers, etc.
     
  9. IL Hunter

    IL Hunter New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Normal, IL
    I never throw anyhting less than 3oz of total weight.

    As far as wind goes once the bait is in the water I don't think the wind will move it too much. I'd definitely try using some kind of sinker.
     
  10. eggman

    eggman New Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Jefferson City, Missouri
    first off, thank you for the responses. Secondly. sinkers suck in my book! I don't care what kind of slip sinker or what type of three way swivel you use, a fish can definatley feel the weight and react accordingly. I have seen this many times as i have tried both methods right next to each other, both rods get bites but the sinkerless ones always prevail

    to you KCCATS, love ya like a bro but you need some help...lol (see below)

    Several things RIGHT here....

    1) treble hooks
    2) Chicken liver
    3) No weight
    4) Light line
    5) Lack of stress tabs
    6) many fish to clean after night is over

    alternative Solution...
    1) Big Circle Hooks
    2) Big hunks of shad or whole live bait
    3) 12 to 15 ft rod
    4) Bigger line, the bigger the better
    5) 3 to 10 oz sinkers
    6) Don't need stress tabs now, you got er covered
    7) you have been wasting time as You are fishing in a channel cat lake and you go home with no fish.

    you pick.....


    egg
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