Peppers: Sweet to Scorchin Hot

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by Texas_Select, Mar 21, 2006.

  1. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    Who grows peppers and what kind?

    I mainly grow hot to extremely hot peppers but also enjoy growing pimento peppers (red and tangerine) and red bells.

    The native chili pequin is my family favorite for generations so that is a must do every year for salsa. The hottest I have grown over the past few years are the caribbean red habaneros I started over ten years ago (my favorite red hab), devils tongue and the yellow fatalii from africa. I taste the chilies in the field while harvesting and almost fell off the bucket I was sitting on after chomping a yellow fatalii last year. That's saying something if ya know just what kind of a chilihead I am!!
     
  2. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    I grow habenero, jalapeno, long cayenne, serrano, large cherry, Ancho, Pasilla, Anaheim peppers, Tai peppers, and Calif wonder. I have yet to grow the pequin, maybe this year! I eat chili peppers with every meal and many of my favorite mexican recipies call for several different types of chilis. Last year, I grew enough to last all year and gave some away! The habanero and tai are the hottest in the world! Tip; Dont try to cool down hot chilis with water, but try eating a piece or bread or tortillia! Works way better!
     

  3. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    I grow jalapenos and used to grow cayenne. Habs are too hot for me. I can't enjoy my food when its that hot. I can my peiners and use them when I smoke my salsa.
     
  4. beeheck

    beeheck New Member

    Messages:
    631
    State:
    Iowa / Missouri
    I grow habenero's to dry and grind up into a fine powder and then add to my homemade deer jerky. When we go to the lake I have to make about 10 lbs of deer meat into hot jerky for the kids, but I love it also. I like the heat they add without the flavor being over powering so I get the hickory flavor with the heat, that's some mighty fine jerky.
     
  5. sal_jr

    sal_jr New Member

    Messages:
    1,390
    State:
    Ithaca, MI
    Here is a list of "heat" involved in peppers. Capsacin is the heating element of a pepper, and the level of heat is measured in "Scoville Units".

    0-100 Scoville Units includes most Bell/Sweet pepper varieties.
    500-1000 Scoville Units includes New Mexican peppers.
    1,000-1,500 Scoville Units includes Espanola peppers.
    1,000-2,000 Scoville Units includes Ancho & Pasilla peppers.
    1,000-2,500 Scoville Units includes Cascabel & Cherry peppers.
    2,500-5,000 Scoville Units includes Jalapeno & Mirasol peppers.
    5,000-15,000 Scoville Units includes Serrano peppers.
    15,000-30,000 Scoville Units includes de Arbol peppers.
    30,000-50,000 Scoville Units includes Cayenne & Tabasco peppers.
    50,000-100,000 Scoville Units includes Chiltepin peppers
    100,000-350,000 Scoville Units includes Scotch Bonnet & Thai peppers.
    200,000 to 300,000 Scoville Units includes Habanero peppers.
    Around 16,000,000 Scoville Units is Pure Capsaicin.

    yanked from here
     
  6. Catcaller

    Catcaller New Member

    Messages:
    1,511
    State:
    SoutheastKansas
    I grew haberneros and jalapenos right next to my bell peppers a few years ago and ended up with some mildly hot bell peppers. Anybody else ever have that happen?
     
  7. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    Scoville levels have been challenged over the years by many commercial growers and seed distributors. Craig Dremman of the Redwood City Seed Comnpany invented the "dremman scale" to affordably and accurately test the heat levels of chilies. It has been an ongoing debate across the internet regarding the "hottest" pepper and always will. The red savina is listed in the guiness book of world records now but I see that challenged real soon.

    Soil conditions, cross pollination, fertilizers, etc. can all have an impact on the heat level of a pepper. I generally isolate one healthy plant for seed stock each year if I plan on growing that variety in the future. All of the other plants are grown together out in the field or hothouse.
     
  8. Gator

    Gator New Member

    Messages:
    1,116
    State:
    Ludowici GA
    I would like some good seeds if anyone has some they would be willing to sell. I like growing peppers but have a hard time finding seeds here.
     
  9. sal_jr

    sal_jr New Member

    Messages:
    1,390
    State:
    Ithaca, MI
    LOL...

    I would venture to assume that after a while, "hot", "Damn Hot", "Burn your lips clean off your face", and "permanent genetic Disfigurement" really cease to matter.
    To me, once you cross the line where your taste buds are numbed and you're in an allout sweat, looking at a buncha numbers on a page of paper rarely offers any consolation.

    heh heh

    But for the sake of information, it is all good to know.;)
     
  10. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    Sal:

    I hear ya brother! It gets heated across the web with everyone claiming to have the hottest. I like flavor but with plenty of natural heat. So many hot sauce manufacturers use artificial capsacin to make the curl ya skin kinda heat but I prefer the natural heat a pepper delivers in my salsa, nothing artificial added.

    After growing over 100 varieties the past 20+ years, I have an opinion on what is hottest to me but certainly may be different to the next person.

    As ya mentioned it is great info to let everyone see where the chilies they grow are positioned in the heat scale. Especially those wanting to try new varieties but may not want the heat!!

    I have grown capsicum frutescens varieties (wild tabasco from guatamala) that was almost as hot as a capsicum chinense variety.

    Long live the chili pepper!!
     
  11. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    Gator,

    I mostly have hot to extremly hot seeds except maybe one or two varieties of sweet peppers. Email me if ya want some seeds.
     
  12. nosnag

    nosnag New Member

    Messages:
    284
    State:
    Florida
    For many years now I've grown the Thai Red Dragon peppers. When I moved down here I left my seed stock back in Ct. To me this was the most flavorable of the hot peppers for making my hot dog relishes.I used them one for one on my haberino relish recipes,and found them superior in taste and just as hot.Trick for flavor is keep them growing in weakly fertilized soil,but give them plenty of water.Plants look raggy but cover themselves with peppers. I plan to get more seed for next year if I can find a place that sells them.
    Here in Florida you just ca'nt find hot relish in the stores. I was really surprised when I looked for it. Only place carrying any that I found was Publix.

    BILL
     
  13. foodsaver

    foodsaver New Member

    Messages:
    526
    State:
    Tennessee
    I am finally settling in in my first house and plan on having a little garden this year. how hard are peppers to grow? What varieties would yall suggest? Are they something i can grow in pots or should I till a garden? I am only planning on doing a couple this year. What about recipes for salsa? Any suggestions yall have are greatly appreciated!
     
  14. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    I would love to know what the sweet, non hot peppers are. My wife and kids can't handle the heat.
     
  15. Gator

    Gator New Member

    Messages:
    1,116
    State:
    Ludowici GA
    Tony try a tomato pepper or sweet banana
     
  16. slimepig

    slimepig New Member

    Messages:
    666
    State:
    Kerrville Texas
    jalapenos are the norm and i like em, but i really like super cayenne. they have more hot and more flavor. If you like bell peppers, try one called mexibell. they have a wonderful flavor and a lil bit of hot.
    this year im thinkin bout trying to grow some japanese peppers. supposed ta be very very hot. has anyone any info on these?
     
  17. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    Tony:

    There are many types of paprika from around the world that are non-pungent and would have to be started from seeds. I like hungarian varieties. Also pimento peppers including the tangerine pimento are very flavorful. Of course there are several varieties of colorful bell peppers and awesome italian sweet peppers. Check seed companies on the internet such as Reimer, Redwood City Seed Company, etc. There are also organic options available.

    The tangerine pimento is one of the few sweet peppers I grow and can tell ya it has incredible flavor right out of the field or on salads, etc.
     
  18. TDawgNOk

    TDawgNOk Gathering Monitor (Instigator)

    Messages:
    3,365
    State:
    Tulsa, Oklahoma
    Thanks!!!!

    I'll check them out!
     
  19. Cherokee

    Cherokee New Member

    Messages:
    1,743
    State:
    Salyersville,Ke
    habenero, jalapeno,sweet banana and hot banana trying to rasie some tepin this year. cheynne is my fav.not to hot and has a great flavor :love-big:
     
  20. Catter

    Catter New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Osceola, Arkansas
    Great post guys....

    I really like just plain old jalapeno's roasted on the grill to bring out the sweetness (and sometimes heat). I usually roll them on the counter to soften them up and distribute the hotties inside. Makes for a great snack when yer smokin meat. lol

    My wife used to make salsa by grillin peppers and tomatoes on the stove. Just grill them till the skin is black, let cool and peel. Then ya grind them up together. Gotta love the smoke flavor they have then. Just make sure ya have a window open or yer smoke alarm will go off. lol


    Joe