Pepper plant problems

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by DANZIG, Jul 1, 2006.

  1. DANZIG

    DANZIG New Member

    Messages:
    6,672
    State:
    West Virginia
    My peppers, Green, sweet banana and jalapeno, do not seem to be doing very well, Some of them got hit by a surprise light frost but seemed to recover. A couple others were planted after the frost. All are just not growing as they should and are just a couple inches larger than when planted. I had this last year also but late August they sprang up with a vengeance.

    Any clues as to what is happening with them?
     
  2. Ahquabi_Master

    Ahquabi_Master New Member

    Messages:
    999
    State:
    WDM Iowa

  3. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
  4. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Peppers seem to take a long time to get going and it seems if any thing goes wrong like root bound, crowded, not enough sun, drying out or overwatering, they will be stunted! Thats been my experience anyway. Out of ten plants, I always have one or two that dont go anywhere!
     
  5. teaysvalleyguy

    teaysvalleyguy New Member

    Messages:
    9,751
    State:
    GC, OHIO
    Wild Bill of TSS will probably give ya some answers as well. That man knows his peppers.
     
  6. DANZIG

    DANZIG New Member

    Messages:
    6,672
    State:
    West Virginia
    Thanks neighbor!
    From what I read perhaps I put them out to soon. I am in a steep holler with a micro climate that runs about two weeks behind most of my area and tends to stay chilly at night longer into the season. I guess I'll just wack 'em with a bit of miracle grow and be patient.
    On the bright side my tomatoes and squashes may soon be interfering with low flying planes!
     
  7. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    next year try starting your peppers inside the house in 5 gallon buckets I keep a couple inside year round and they do well. I start them about 2 months before and then move them outside and plant them with my mater's and have had good luck doing this for many years.
     
  8. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    It does sound like ya set them out too early. Chilies need warm soil when transplanting and need to be mulched in to maintain moisture and warmth for the root system so they will not get transplant shock. Do not over fertilize to try and help them along. I generally apply some organic fertilizer that is made from poultry litter between the dirt and mulch when transplanting. For capsicum chinense (habanero varieties) I also add some bonemeal beacause they need additional calcium to prevent the leaves from curling and will produce healthier plants and well developed fruit.

    Good luck with em and please keep us posted.