people buying guns who don't have a clue....

Discussion in 'Handgun Talk' started by iabowhunter, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    I was at a sporting goods store today and saw someting that just wasn't right. A couple was looking at handguns...9mm auto loaders. I like listening to sales pitches that these big box sales people give people that have no clue as to what they are looking for in a handgun. He was pushing a 9mm to a very thin woman. Now I have no problem with women shooting 9mm's at all. What I do have a problem with is a sales person pushing a 9mm to a woman who has never shot a handgun before. After slick was done pushing his goods I spoke to them and ask if either one of them had shot a firearm before. Neither had ever snapped a trigger. The first thing I suggested to them was to find a local gun range and ask to be tought to shoot the right way. The next thing I suggested was for them to look into a Ruger .22 auto loader and learn trigger control before they jump into a center fire cartridge. Then I explaind how I just had to have a 9mm when I started shooting handgun, I'll admit it, I was a Die Hard fan and had to have a Beretta 92FS cause it could shoot smilie faces in the back of leather jackets real quick. I couldn't hit anything with it. I traded the 9 for a .22 and learned trigger control...the way I should of done it in the first place.

    Folks, if you see something similar to this, step in and suggest that they go to a local firing range and request someone to teach them to shoot. I have seen to many accidents happen (non life threating but had the potential to be) at our local gun club to let this couple and their 4 kids get away with out saying something to them.

    I was at the range one night and a guy was there shooting his 45 acp. He had no business with a handgun...none at all. We have a 5 shot in the magizine rule...no more then 5 rounds in a mag. He had shoot 4 times and had lost count of his shoots. He was looking through a telescope at his target down range with his finger on the trigger of his still loaded 45. He was pissed off that he only had 4 holes on the target, thought he pulled one, pulled the trigger and put a hole in our table. I sat him down and had a talk with him afterwards and explained how bad this situation could of been. Then ask him what he was doing with a 45 as his first handgun. I later found out that he was scared to death of Y2K and wanted to protect his stash. We didn't see him again after Jan of 2000.

    Sorry to go on about this. If we as gun owners don't step up to the plate and help out the "newbies" getting into the shooting sports for whatever reason, there is going to be allot of accidents that could of been prevented and the gun grabbers will have a fit over it.
     
  2. DANNYfrmINDY

    DANNYfrmINDY New Member

    Messages:
    194
    State:
    Martinsville, Indiana
    Very well thought out post. I completely understand where your coming from on the whole learning before buying. I wish i would have had someone like you around when i bought my first handgun. I was a nice, shiny, and big(to me) Taurus PT911 9mm. If i would have had someone like you around it would have saved me 4 stitches in my forehead. I have since traded it for a P22 complete kit and started training my wife on proper gun control.

    Once again thanks for bringing up a important topic.
     

  3. TITANSFAN2104

    TITANSFAN2104 New Member

    Messages:
    577
    State:
    Smith county TN
    i agree for the most part!! my first handgun was a springfield 45 xd and i sttill havent shot over two boxes through it and ive killed a few turtles and one squirrel with it @ 25 yds... but i have hunted and owned all sorts of guns. but you are right !! hell sell her the 50 cal desert eagle!! people who have never been around guns should not jump into the biggest baddest cal out until they know how to handle a small gun!! as forr the guy he wouldve got more than a talking to!! :wink:
     
  4. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    Me to brother, me too. It wasn't untill after I sold the Beretta and bought a .22 that I went to the local gun club and learned trigger control.


    You know what is funny about that? There was a 50 action express Desert Eagle right above the Ruger .22 auto loaders that I told them to look at!!!!! LOL
     
  5. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    Great post Phil hope it helps some folks out. My first handgun was a taurus 44 mag revolver, lol, but I been shooting since I was a kid so I knew what I was getting. Now I have the 44, a P11 9mm and a ruger mark3 22/45. Guess which one gets shot most often.
     
  6. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    I agree,, a little education and training goes a LONG way to proficiency and Safety..

    Same thing in the Motorcycle world...Lots of people on motorcycles these days,, but,, Very Few Riders..
     
  7. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    I could'nt of said it better myself.
     
  8. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    While I agree for the most part, I think that a 9mm is a good caliber to learn with as well. As long as it is a quality gun with a decent trigger it should suffice as a trainer gun as well as a personal protection gun.

    A good little ruger .22 or something simular is great. You can learn a lot of fundamentals with these guns. They are fun and cheap to shoot as well. But if I only had $500 and I needed a pistol, I would buy a centerfire and just learn on it.

    The 9mm has light recoil, the shells are resonably priced, and I think that it is sometimes better to learn on what you are going to use.
     
  9. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    One thing to remember about those .22 ruger semi's is they are a pain to keep clean. Good luck to a newbie putting that thing back together.:wink:
     
  10. Jasongonefishing

    Jasongonefishing New Member

    Messages:
    54
    State:
    McDonough,
    Agree with most of what is said. It is very imprortant to understand and learn the basic safety that goes with firearms. If you can't tell if you have a empty or loaded gun then you don't need the gun to began with. I also have to agree that if you are learning to carry then it is best to learn with the gun you will be carrying. You also need to prepare for different thing while shooting. My first gun was a after market 380. While at the range I had a bullet jam in the chamber and as I lowed my gun to pull the slide back the dam thing fired. These are the types of things you need to keep in mind. If I did not know to keep the barrel away from people of myself it could of been worse them just putting a bullet into the ground....:eek:oooh:
     
  11. big riggin' younggun

    big riggin' younggun New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Illinois
    i dont understand whats the big rage with semi-autos i own a ruger super redhawk 44mag with a 9 in. barrel and its used for hunting. if some one has a semi-auto handgun in the house stats. show that it's 75percent more likely to be used on a family member than on an intruder.
     
  12. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    I personally like my 1911. It has several different safeties that make it ALMOST impossible for a childs hand to make it shoot.
    I still keep it away from any areas that kids can get into and on safety.
    I do like the wheel guns too though. I am wanting a hammerless .38 spl for my wife to carry in her purse.
     
  13. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Not sure you which Ruger you're talking about?
    My first handgun was this one.

    It's now 53 years old and never have I seen it fail to shoot because it needed cleaning. And I'm not a fanatic about cleaning guns. Also it's pretty simple to disassemble and reassemble... that is..if you know how. Between long times of cleaning sometimes I still have to refer to the instruction manual. :wink:

    I get a big laugh when first time gun buyers go out and buy the largest gun they can find. I've know some that did when buying one for their wife. One of those is my son in law. My daughter doesn't have enough hand strength to work the action.

    Good thread Phil!
     
  14. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    Good post and i agree whole hartedly. It's not just guns either. I had a guy seel me a 400 single cyl. dirt bike when i was a kid, that mopped the ground with me every time i rode it.:embarassed: Local boat place will gladly sell ya a 70 mph boat, even though ya don't know how to run it, Harley shops are the same way,,,etc. I think every desent American should own a gun, but also feel they should know how to use it before their allowed to buy one also.
     
  15. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    The Ruger mark 2 autoloaders are a pain to take down...umtill you have done it a few times. I don't know how many times I have been in a gun shop and a guy walks in with his tail tucked between his legs and his mark 2 in pieces. LOL

    I carry a Kimber 1911 whenever I go into the timber. Never know what you are going to see. I would never hunt deer with it. I have a Blackhawk 44 for that and I would still take the Encore ahead of the Blackhawk as I feel it is more accurate.

    I agree that some people can start out with something bigger then a 22 depending on their experiance with firearms....like if they have been around firearms all their lives. These people I talked to had not even fired a pellet rifle. A dealer I talked to told me that more professional people in the citys are buying firearms right now because they are afraid of how the economy is going to turn out. By professional people I mean doctors, lawyers, professers and so on. People who have had very little experiance with firearms umlike us gun nuts.
     
  16. vfourmax

    vfourmax New Member

    Messages:
    251
    State:
    Va
    I have always felt that a double action revolver made a much better defense weapon for people that are not "gun" people and new to firearms.

    So much more as far as simplicity, easy to load and unload and almost idiot proof to check the status of the guns in that respect. No safety to not remember which way is on or off, no jam ups or failure to eject to contend with. Also open the cylinder and drop out the rounds no chance of a newby thinking by taking out the magazine that it is unloaded forgetting there may still be one in the chamber.

    A nice .357 revolver will allow the use of very low recoil .38's to gain the comfort level and proficeny in the proper use of the weapon, also very easy to clean and maintain with virtually no dis-assembly required.

    For the above reasons I usually always recommend a new shooter start with a revolver as their first sidearm.
     
  17. jmanion8

    jmanion8 New Member

    Messages:
    424
    State:
    Kansas
    Thank you very much for this post! As a long-time hunter with lots of rifle experience, I'm a first time handgun purchaser. I've shot all sorts of handguns, from 22's to 9's to 45 to some stronger revolvers. I'm looking to buy my first pistol, mainly for security and protection because I camp/fish down at the river three to four nights a week. Lots of coyotes come around, I know a few rocks or whatever might send them away, I'd like a little something more to get rid of them.

    What are your suggestions for my first handgun purchase? I've been looking at the local gunshop at a Taurus .45 and a Ruger 9 mm, but am certainly still not sure what would be best. Please help!
     
  18. beetle

    beetle New Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    Ohio
    Good post Phil! I've seen the same thing.
     
  19. JoeDaCatKing

    JoeDaCatKing New Member

    Messages:
    750
    State:
    PA
    Im glad my local gunstore isnt like that everytime I go in there I end up learning something new and helpful. Im pretty new into firearms myself, my first purchase a Colt Mustang plus 2 380 and learned to shoot with that. I got very lucky because when i bought it I didnt know the quality of it and found out it was a steal price and a solid pocket gun. Not everyone can be so lucky so it is very important to try before you buy. One mistake i did make is I bought this without realizing that 380 ammo was nearly impossible to get. Lesson learned... just to brag a bit though i bought it from a private owner for 200 and found out these things retail for upwards of 700

    great thread!
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2009
  20. Kansas Tree Rat

    Kansas Tree Rat New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Waverly, Kansas
    I also agree with most of what has been said. I agree 100% that anyone that is just starting out NEEDS trainning. However I really don't see a problem with learning on a full sized 9mm. Like James said cheap ammo and low recoil. One thing is that it should NOT be a compact or sub-compact, much better to learn on a full size gun.
    I would suggest that anyone starting completly green NOT start with a handgun in the first place, a .22 auto rifle would be much better to learn sight picture and trigger control in the first place. Then buy and shoot the handgun you are going to use all the time.
    On top of that if a person wanted HOME protection they should be looking at cheap 20 ga. pump shotguns anyway.