Paper tuning your Bow

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by SSG Johnson, Aug 27, 2005.

  1. SSG Johnson

    SSG Johnson New Member

    Messages:
    638
    State:
    Saint Robert Missouri
    Does anyone know how to paper tune a bow.
     
  2. RamRod

    RamRod New Member

    Messages:
    2,047
    State:
    Ohio
    I'm not sure, but you may want to ask Desperado!
     

  3. sgt_rob

    sgt_rob Member

    Messages:
    961
    State:
    Bossier City, LA
    Aside from the obvious (shooting the arrow through paper so you can see the hole it is leaving behind) there are entire books written on how to fix the problems you might uncover in the process. There are just too many variables to consider posting them all. Everything effects the way an arrow performs when paper tuning. Arrow diameter/wall thickness=stiffness,broadhead weight, draw weight, type of release aid, type of rest. If all those factors are right, then it usually boils down to knock position on the string (high, low or too tight) interference with the fletchings on the arrow rest or riser (fletchings too large or too long or wrong material or position), and arrow rest type or position (left or right). You will get into "indexing" your broadheads where the heads are inserted and then the end of the arrow shaft is heated allowing you to make all broadheads look the same when they are installed (all have a blade pointing at 12 O-Clock)

    It has been years since I've shot paper but I believe the initial shots are at 5 yards. Get the arrow right at 5 yards then move out to 10 then 15. You will be OK if you are shooting good paper at 15 yards. You are looking for either a perfect X or slightly nock high/left for right-handed shooters (because the arrow has just cleared the rest and is reacting from it.

    Don't quote me, the book is in the attic right now. I do remember it was an eye-opening experience trying to paper-tune my bow. I ended up changing arrow size, broadhead weight and draw weight (ended up pulling 76 lbs to shoot good paper).
     
  4. crane

    crane New Member

    Messages:
    368
    State:
    Paragould, AR
    Paper tuning is a great method to help solve arrow flight problems. I like to shoot through paper to determine if the arrow is flying good expecially when I am setting up my bow for shooting broadheads. I have found that it is the best tool to determine the right spine and length of arrow that is best suited for each persons bow and shooting style. Just because your buddy shoot a certain arrow with a certain weight tip and flys good doesn't mean it will fly good for your bow. How you torque your bow plays a big factor in how the arrow will react coming out of the bow.

    Set up some paper and shoot at least 3 shots from about 8 feet from the paper. Be sure that the target behind the paper is far enough that the arrow completely passes though the paper before hitting the target. The tear left by the arrow will tell you if your arrow is too stiff or weak, if your knocking point is too high or low, and if your rest is too far right or left. The tears will mean different things for left handed and right handed shooters, release or finger shooters, and also different rests. The best place to get an explanation of what the tears mean is to go to your local archery dealer and pick up an easton arrow guide and it will have explanations on what the tears mean and what to do to fix them. If you can't find the guide just shoot some arrows and let me know how it tears and I'll help you out all I can. Good luck!!
     
  5. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    Don't chase the tear to long, little changes in hand pressure or form can cause mystery tears............very frustrating!! Personally I bare arrow at 5 then 10 yards, then group tune out to the max. yardage. Go to the easton arrow site and look for some of their tuning bulletins, great stuff.
     
  6. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    If I remember right you shoot a Muzzy zero-effect(that's what I shoot also). Fletch contact is non-existent, torque is negated do to a lack of solid pivot point and if you get your spines right it's hard not to have great broadhead flight. As long as your arrows aren't hitting the target sideways(spines way wrong,most likely).............shoot 3 unfletched arrows into the target, then shoot 3 fletched arrows in the target(10 yards), move your nocking point or rest till you get the 2 arrow types hitting together. After that, do the same with your broadheads and your fieldpoints. Hope that all made sense.
     
  7. SSG Johnson

    SSG Johnson New Member

    Messages:
    638
    State:
    Saint Robert Missouri
    Thanks center you are correct I do have a Muzzy Zero effect rest. I will try what you said tommorrow and let you know how it turns out.
     
  8. center12

    center12 New Member

    Messages:
    1,444
    State:
    KS
    Good luck to ya. Those Muzzy's ain't the prettiest rest out there, but there is no doubt it will do it's job..........no strings attached!! As long as your arrow spine is close and your FOC is on the plus side I doubt you'll have much trouble............you are shooting a Muzzy and a Mathews after all, I really like that combo :)
     
  9. SSG Johnson

    SSG Johnson New Member

    Messages:
    638
    State:
    Saint Robert Missouri
    Thanks center that did it just had to turn my fletchings upside down on my arrow and that corrected it. I had forgot about doing that from last year. Its wild to see the back of the arrow kick to the left in flight but turning the fletchings over seemed to do the trick to get it to stop doing that. Now im back to shooting 3" groups at 20 yrds and tearing up fletchings all the time.....lol..
     
  10. JDM2007

    JDM2007 New Member

    Messages:
    21
    Go to eastonarchery.com and download there bow/arrow tuning guide helped me tons.