Over the hill gang Part 2

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Mac-b, Jan 10, 2009.

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  1. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well, OF's lets do it again. Enjoy
     
  2. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

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    Hey. 'Ol timer, where's the spittoon?

    See ya swept the floor and painted the walls a new coat of paint. Still kinda homey in here. Imagine the rest of the bunch will be coming by and get their coffee cups out the cupboard soon.

    What ya going to do for entertainment this round Mr Mac?
     

  3. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

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    Continued from OTHG #1; memories from Great-great-aunt Isma

    The fall of 1902, I started my second year of school. My horizon began to widen. I knew more people and began to pick out friends. There were five families that lived on the southeast side of the school that walked the same road we did till each took the path from the highway to their home.

    My uncle lived the farthest away. He lived across the river from us. There were four children in school from that home. The next family had two boys. The next had five children, four old enough to go to school. Last was the Miller family. There were eight children, just six old enough to go to school.

    Mr.Miller was a tall, skinny, friendly man who ran a blacksmith shop. His shop was close beside the road, and he could fix anything that needed fixing on the farm, from shoeing your horse and fixing your wagon wheel to sharpening your ax. We children loved to see him shoe horses. He would trim the hoof and run the bellows, getting the shoe hot so he could fit a cork on the back of the shoe so the horse's foot would not slip when he was pulling.

    There were no school children in this family, but she was a neighbor who everybody would have missed if she would not have been there. Her name was Liza Bowman. We always called her Aunt Liza. She was a widow; her husband was killed in the War Between the States. When any of us children got sick, Mother would always send for Aunt Liza and she would always come bringing herbs and home remedies with her. Sometimes she would stay all night if we were very sick.

    I shall always remember the night I spent with her. When Mother would go to spend the night with her parents, Grandpa Teague's, Artie or I would stay home and do the chores and spend the night with a neighbor, so I said I wanted to stay with Aunt Liza.

    I had always admired her beds. They were tall, four poster beds - at least four feet up to the rail. They were cord beds. She always had them made up so pretty with handmade wool coverlettes on top with hand-tied fringe on underneath sheets. The fringe would be showing about six inches below the coverlet. When I got in the bed that night, I was like Granny in the Hill Billies. I thought I had gone to heaven. There was a feather bed on top of the mattress, then a nice soft comforter on that, then your sheets and a little soft quilt. When I laid down on that I felt like I was floating away in the clouds. Needless to say, I slept like a log.

    When I awoke, Aunt Liza was up and had built a fire in the fireplace and was fixing breakfast. Like everybody in those days, she had a wide hearth in her kitchen and was cooking by the fireplace. She had a stove but in cold weather she cooked by the fireplace. She had a little skillet with legs about three inches long. She shoveled out live coals on the hearth and set the skillet on the coals and put a couple slices of ham in the skillet. Boy did that smell good and taste better with a piece of sourdough bread baked in the skillet by the fireplace.

    Before we sat down to eat, she filled the skillet with sweet potatoes and put fresh coals on the lid till we finished breakfast and washed the dishes and I was ready to go home. She wrapped up a potato for each pocket. She said they would keep my hands warm and would taste good later in the day. Now you can see why a ten-year-old girl loved to spend the night with a seventy-year-old woman.

    Now I will get back to telling about my home life. The spring my father died, my mother had to work so hard with the garden to plant and field crops to plant. After the crops were all planted, about the middle of May she had to shear the sheep. I would always sit at the door of the stable and watch her clip the wool off the sheep. They looked so ugly when that thick fleece of wool was first taken off. We would put them in a good warm stable till they got used to their fleece being taken off. We would put the mother sheep up when they had a little lamb. They were the sweetest, most innocent-looking animal I know. The mother would stomp her foot at us when we came near when the lambs were small, but in a few weeks, we could hold them in our arms.

    Mother didn't like shearing sheep so she sold them all but six, just enough to get wool for our stockings. She sold one of the mules and the two-horse wagon and bought a one-horse wagon. Arthur could handle the one mule, so now we could go to church and to our grandpa's and our kinfolk's. Mother and Arthur would go to Hickory about twice a week that summer with a load of peaches. Our young orchard had just begun to bear. We would gather the peaches the evening before and have them loaded in the wagon so Mother and Arthur could leave early, sometimes before sun-up, so they could sell their peaches and get home before dark. Artie, Carl and myself stayed home. Mother always had a job for us. If we got done before night, we could go to Uncle Tom's and play with our cousins. Sometimes we had to hoe the peanuts, or a patch of corn or peas.

    On this particular day, it was to halve peaches and put them out to dry. In case you don't know what halving peaches is, I will inform you. Back in those days, most every farm had a few trees of these peaches. They were little open stones about one inch in diameter. You just cut them in half to take out the seed and put them out on the dry boxes to dry with seed side up. It took almost as long to lay them out to dry as it did to halve them. Mother told Arthur to go and shake the peach trees so we would have some work to do while they were gone. We had six trees of that particular kind and I think he tried to shake them all off. We were still halving peaches when they came home that evening, but we were happy.

    Mother had bought material to make us dresses, and she said if we would be smart and help take care of the fruit, she would take us along to Hickory when the circus came to town that fall, and would have a group picture made of the family and we would spend the night at our grandpa Moretz's. That was a treat to look forward to. When you remember we had not been there since our father's death, as we had no way to travel till we bought the one-horse wagon. Mother kept her promise. Every chance she could get away from the farm work and taking care of the fruits from the orchard she was sewing, making the dresses for us to have our pictures made in. I think of all the dresses I have had in my seventy-three years, I liked that one the best. If you don't believe it was pretty, come and I will show you the picture. Let me tell you how they were made. The material was navy blue wool worsted. It had a square plush velvet yoke with satin ribbon gathered in the middle all the way around the yoke. It had a gored skirt set to the waist with a band.

    Well, at last the big day had come. Ads on all the country stores and along the public roads said the circus was coming to Hickory on September 30th.

    To be continued.....
     
  4. olefin

    olefin New Member

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    Another great story Tanya. I think I read where she was 73 when she wrote those. She sure had a good memory. I sure can't recall details of my childhood like that.

    I'd give anything if I could talk with my mom today about her childhood. She told me a lot over the years but I was much younger and wasn't very interested.
     
  5. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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  6. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

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    Dayton, it thrills me to no end that I have this documentation. There ARE other copies of it, but it was only distributed to family members/close friends.

    I knew Aunt Isma, but I was just a l'il tyke at the time and would've never remembered all of these stories if they weren't recorded, even if she'd told them to me.

    You might find it interesting to know.....she also remembered every single name of every single child she went to school with. I purposely left those out - but yes, she had a GREAT memory.
     
  7. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If only I had a beer, I would be crying in it right now. A while back Social Security informed me that I would be getting a 5.8% raise ($65+-) in my January check. I jumped for joy because I knew that I could now afford to get the high speed Internet connection so I could view videos without them stopping every 5 to 10 seconds. Later Medicare informed me that my premium would be going up and I was not too alarm because I still had several dollars left for the high speed stuff. Then earlier this week, I got a letter from my secondary health insurance company informing me that my premium would be going up $35+ a month. Methinks that I now have a buck fifty left out of my big raise. Something tells me I ain't going to be cutting no deal with nobody with chunk change. Someone unfamous once said "the faster I go, the further behind I get".

    At this moment I feel like the fellow in the poem that went something like this "here I sit downhearted, trying to cheet and only farted".

    Have the rest of you OF's did the math on your 2009 raise? If you have not, maybe you should. :angry::confused2::crazy:
     
  8. oh no

    oh no New Member

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    Mac, I'm lucky, my wife has insurance at work, so I get my whole raise. I think I will treat myself to some Valpo Velvet Black Cherry Burgundy. Yum Yum

    If you add 4 dollars to your raise, you can get a half gallon too.

    Raise don't come till the 4th Wednesday here.
     
  9. olefin

    olefin New Member

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    Mac, since you mention it. I checked and looks like I had a net deposit increase of $75. That's after deducting $18 for my Blue Cross insurance increase.

    I worked for 32 years and don't have any company insurance for I exceeded the lifetime maximum the year after I retired. My wife never worked but still has insurance from where I worked.
     
  10. olefin

    olefin New Member

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    [SIZE=-2]My daughter send me the following email with the pictures she received from a friend on the anniversary of Elvis's past birthday. I don't remember the King being in Odessa but I spent part of 1976 in the Houston area starting up a new ethylene plant.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE=-2]
    [/SIZE]
    [FONT=&quot]HAPPY BIRTHDAY ELVIS!!!!![/FONT]
    Some pics from when Elvis was here in Odessa in May 1976- he gave 2 concerts - 2:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.I was at the evening concert. He was still in good shape then… (sigh) You can see Linda Thompson- his girlfriend- behind him in the last picture.
     

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  11. catoon

    catoon Board Clown!

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    hey is this the new old folks line lol lmao
     
  12. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    i qualify on all fronts as an OLD FART and i must say i never for a min thought that some friends would put me in the rest home.figured it would be the wife no matter im here and guess ill stay till i get throwed out.
     
  13. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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  14. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Have any of you OF's checked catoon's ID ?
     
  15. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

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    An East wind rising means.....

    It's gonna rain.
    It is a good time to fish.
    Stay under cover.
    Time to plant petunias.

    Macs link reference, plows and farming, made me think of some things about my Dad which he learned from his Dad as relates weather and when that plow should be left in the shed and greased.

    We all have had Aunts and Uncles, Grandpas and Grandmas who lived with the world around them and understood it because it made the difference in dry hay or wet hay, a garden washed out or a dry picnic, or a safe day to take a boat out, or a good time to fish.

    I found out some things from the link I will post on how they did that by observation and what they looked at and saw and smelled. They may not have know the reasons for what they saw, they just knew when they saw them what might happen.

    http://www/ssrsi.org/Onsite/BBtext/weather.htm.

    John.
     
  16. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The attached story is about a hog killing in Bertie County, NC, adjacent to the county I was raised in. Enjoy http://files.usgwarchives.net/nc/bertie/history/hoggard.txt

    After my wife and myself were married, I took her down East to the family annual hog killing. Her job, along with my grandmother was to clean out the intestines for sausage stuffing. They had small bamboo reeds to turn the intestines inside out and squeeze the feces and worms out and then they would rinse them several times. From that point on, Frankie could no longer eat link sausage. My father and one of my uncles did most of the butchering.
     
  17. willcat

    willcat New Member

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    Interesting read there Mac, the last time we had a big party @ my mom's before she passed my stepdad had some of his friend come over and they butchered a hog in the back yard, and cooked him on an old disc, that was very good pork!!
     
  18. bluejay

    bluejay Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the link Mac. We used to do our own butchering also. One of my favorites was the "head cheese". Don't remember how it was made as I was pretty young at the time. It was a family affair.
     
  19. pythonjohn

    pythonjohn New Member Supporting Member

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    Use to help with that chore down in Meryville Georgia.

    Never forgot the smell of a scalded pig getting it ready for scraping the hair.

    I don't believe most people would know how this is done now days.

    Maybe one day we may have to go back to the basics.......

    I sure hope not, a lot of folks would go hungry...............

    Maybe even me!:eek:oooh:

    Did some "chicken picking" back then too.

    We all would like to say we could live off the land but that would be hard!

    Not so sure that would work these days.

    Thanks for the memories Mac!
     
  20. jdstraka

    jdstraka Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    John
    Boy this subject brings back some memories,It's a shame that our young folks would have a tough time making do this day and age,Butchering,raising a garden,canning and freezing,baking,cooking,baking bread,and on and on. it's very possable that some day not to far in the distant future they might need some of those skills to get by !! I Know I can, but I will have a Whole house full of grown children to take care of Again,LOL J.D.:sad2:
     
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