On line Club seminar

Discussion in 'Carolina Catfish Club' started by Mac-b, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    19,789
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    Mac
    Review the attached photo's and see if you can tell what kind of catfish is illustrated.
     
  2. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    19,789
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    Mac
    Here are the photographs
     

  3. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

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    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Im thinking its a channel cat.
     
  4. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

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    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    First pic. looks like a blue though with the bottom lip not past the top lip.
    Cant count the number of rays on the fins too well, but apears to be rounded shaped. Well see what everyone else thinks.
     
  5. TomV

    TomV New Member

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    356
    State:
    Warsaw, Missouri
    I'm also guessing a channel cat.
     
  6. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The catfish has 23-24 rays.
     
  7. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

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    7,175
    State:
    NC
    I count 23 rays, head wider than body, white chin barbels....white cat. Would love to see that tail to see what the fork looks like. That would help clear it up some.

    I catch a good many of these on Wylie that are almost like a hybrid between a channel and a white. Some of the white cats have clearly defined markings, then there are the in between fence stradlers with the number of rays being right in between a channel and a white cat!
     
  8. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
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    Mac
    It is an Ameiurus Catus (white catfish), WylieCat got it right. Students, next time print out the photo and you will be able to count the rays. Mac
     
  9. Catgirl

    Catgirl New Member

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    13,546
    I counted the rays in the pic Mac...got THAT right. After that I reviewed what had been said on this board previously. Didn't look WHITE......assume that's what most folks were thinking, who may have looked at the picture. (Could that be WHY you posted it?) A lot of us may be children, as far as catfish go. That's the wonderful thing about the BOC, you learn something everyday. Now you've taught us that whites don't always appear as such.
     
  10. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
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    Mac
    Catgirl, myself and others have been catching white catfish for years thinking they were the male of the channel cat species. Thanks to WylieCat back in August I found out what they were. I caught one yesterday and new exactly what I was going to do with it. Take a picture and share it with the BOC as an educational piece. By doing this, maybe it will not take the newbies ten years to figure out what they are catching, like it has for me and a bunch of other catfishing persons.

    The membership can go to the BOC Library and find this data but, they don't know it and I figured I would help out with this process.

    Check in for more on line seminar features by the Carolinas Catfish Club.

    PS, does everyone know who came in third in the 2007 Cabela's King Kat Classic? I do and I'm dang proud of ________________aka, roundhill.
     
  11. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    (1) when you are finished fishing for the day, back off your star drag before storing your rod and reel. If you don't, the drag acts as a brake and sets up. Example of this is when you park your car for a period of time with the emergency brake on, it will setup and you will not know this until you start the car/truck up and move you will hear a snapping sound. That is the brake breaking loose. This occurs with your reel when you don't release the star drag. When you hear of someone losing a big fish and he/she says that it broke their line, most likely it is the drag that broke the line because it could not release the way it was design too.

    (2)the next time before you go fishing, why don't you pull off the line (approx. 6 to 8') from the reel to the end of the rod, plus three or four feet and throw that line in the trash can. My reason for this advice is that this line has been exposed to the sun, has been fished with, has been hit by stuff in your boat, truck or car while transporting it and most likely will have a nick in the line. Also, retie your shock leader and check your hook to make sure it is still sharp.

    (3)you should replace your line two to three times a year with line that you have confidence in. The cheaper the line the more often you should replace it.

    (4)if you are a smoker here are a few things to consider as it relates to your fishing line. If you have your rod and reels stored in an upright position at the rear of the boat think about this. If you are smoking while you are underway and flicking your ashes where do you think those ashes are going?
    Also, when you are just sitting there in the boat and nothing is going on and you light one up and then all of a sudden you get a fish on, get rid of the cig's before you pick up your rod and reel and start bringing the fish in. In the excitement of the fight I have seen several fish lost due to the fisherman letting his cig. hit the fishing line.

    (5)too much memory in your fishing line. You can correct this by spraying some contact cleaner on the line (including the spool) or get yourself a mister and spray some water on it. Also, you can let most of your line off the reel while you are traveling at no wake speed for a mile or two and then retrive it and the line will loose all the curls (memory).

    (6)do wear your life jacket if you are fishing by yourself because if you don't, you will not have to worry about items 1 thru 5. Mac
     
  12. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
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    You stop to gas up your boat on the way to your fishing location and you get a little gas or oil on your hands. Or you are going to fish at night and you put some bug spray on your hands, face and neck. Or you put after shave lotion on your face before you head out to fish. Or you get some other type of unnatural scent on your hands. And then you spent some time on the water fishing and you don't do very well and you blame it on the North East wind, full moon, too much natural bait in the lake or river, or some other excuse for not catching many if any fish.

    You get home and read on the BOC message board that so and so fished the same area and got a PB and a bunch of other cats to go along with it. You start wondering if you selected the right hole to fish in or if there was some thing wrong with your bait selection or if you were drifting too fast or too slow.

    What you did was transfer the gas, oil, lotion, etc. to your bait from your hands and Mr. Whiskers came along and smelled it and said no way do I want that in my mouth. The solution is to clean your hands real good, several times if necessary and then when you get ready to fish. Take one of your dead bait and squeeze it in your hands and more or less wash your hands in the juices of the bait and then towel dry your hands and then start baiting up. The more natural the bait smells the more fish you will catch. Been there, done that! Mac
     
  13. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

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    7,175
    State:
    NC
    Sunscreen.

    Thats another one that can put a film on your hands that may be offensive to fish.
     
  14. jerryb

    jerryb New Member

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    551
    State:
    Ohio
    Gotta say...

    I like these "seminars"!
     
  15. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Mac
    The most productive speed to drift is 1/2 MPH, but in the summer you can creep up to 3/4 MPH and in the winter time try to stay around 1/2 MPH or less.

    The wind is blowing 10 to 15 MPH and you can not maintain the above speeds. What do you do to correct this situation? You can troll (trolling motor) into the wind if you have auto-pilot (if you have manual controls you will work yourself to death trying to maintain a course). If you go with the wind you will need a drift sock or two (a five gallon bucket will also do the trick) to slow you down to the desired speed. If you don't have a trolling motor you can turn your boat (side of boat) into the wind and put out several drift socks or buckets to slow you down to the desired speed.

    When drifting, alway put your outboard motor gear in forward. The reason for this advice is that if you leave the gear in neutral, the propeller is spinning with the drift and will pick up loose line in the water and wrap around your propeller shaft. When line wraps around your outboard motor shaft it can create heat and pressure and do harm to your lower seal and thus let water into the lower end. When this happens, expect to fork out $1,200 to $1,700+- for repairs.

    When you go across an area and it is productive, be sure to hit your waypoint key to mark the area for your next drift and if you don't have GPS
    pick out some physical points on land to try to get back to the same area.

    Additional information can be found in the BOC library. Mac
     
  16. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
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    Speed when drifting is very important. Too fast and the strike rate falls off considerably. Why? It can be blamed on the bait not being in the area long enough for fish to swim it down and take it, and you can also be moving fast enough to pull your baits 3-4 feet off the bottom and out of the strike zone.

    Remember, when you are dragging baits through 15-20 feet of water it is very dark at these depths in a clear lake, and in many lakes and rivers where it is muddy it will be almost black! The fish are relying almost 100% on scent to make a strike.

    I am all for .45-.60, with a .70 being the max I want to troll at.

    Another important element is staggering your lines when drifting. This serves two purposes, with the first being ability to turn without tangling. Most folks let the center two out the farther; with the next two 2/3-3/4 the distance of the first. If you are running six rods you can set the next two out about 1/2 the distance of the first two. Obviously if you are not making any turns and just drifting a straight line the stagger is not as important.

    The second purpose for staggering your baits is the spread of scent. The first lines that pass through lay a trail of scent the fish pick up on, move in on, and then take the trailing baits. That is why I believe the lines farther out get more hits!!
     
  17. Novice

    Novice New Member

    Messages:
    19
    State:
    North Carolina
    thank you for reaminding me about the stagering of the lines mack told me but I am just geting started and forgot Iwill not forget agin walter :cool2:
     
  18. billfish76

    billfish76 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,133
    State:
    Rock Hill, SC
    If you want to take stagering your lines one step further use planer boards and add 2 more rods
     
  19. Mac-b

    Mac-b Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    19,789
    State:
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    Mac
    (1) Live bait: if you are drifting hook the fish from the lower part of the mouth out thru the head or you can hook it thru the eyes. If you hook thru the eyes the hook will sometime turn into the bait and you will not have a hook exposed. If you are anchorded down, hook the bait back of the dorsal fin to allow it to swim around or you can do the mouth/eye setup.

    (2)Cut bait drifting:eek:ne small bait can give you three pieces of bait. First filet off the sides and then cut the head off. Put one filet on each hook and this presentation when drifting gives a wavy action to your bait and plenty of scent. Bass fishermen use something like a pork rind strip to accomplish the same thing. The head of a small bait fish gives off a lot of scent and to me is the best bait for blues and sometimes flatheads. If the bait is large you can get more pieces (bait) out of it. On a small bait fish you might try leaving the carass with the head on and trolling it. Also, some people will take a shad or other bait fish and filet one side from the tail to the head (do not cut filet off) and then run the hook thru the eyes of the bait fish and then take the filet side and attach it to the hook. This give off a lot of scent and a different action to your bait.

    (3)Cut bait when anchorded:A lot of people just use chunks of the bait fish. The size of cats that you are fishing should determine the size of your chunks. You can take a bait fish filet and double hook it will the meat part out. You can also use the bait fish head. You can doctor your bait fish chunks by marinating it in shad oil or other fish oils, plus some fishermen use garlic, WD 40 or other natural oils, etc.


    What are the best bait fish for you to use? The answer is simple and not so simple. The first answer would be what is native to you locale. But, on LKN in the winter time we sometimes fish with rainbow trout and they can produce a trophy fish in a heart beat. Same for gold fish, ells, black salties, etc. Best bet is to have two or three baits ready for your trip. We should not forget about the night crawler, shrimp, stink baits, liver, gizzards, etc. all of which have caught some mighty fine cats but, if you are going to catch real nice cats I would advise you to stick with the native/natural baits.

    I am sure other Club members and/or BOC members might have other options/suggestions and they are welcome to express them to aid in this educational process. Mac
     
  20. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    heres my drifting method for shad/herring/whiteperch/bream. 1. stick the hook thru the mouth and out the gill. 2. hook the bait right behind the gill plate and rotate the hook down thru the middle of the bait until the hook come back out towards the tail. 3. repeat number 2 starting at the exit point of the hook and continue sewing until you reach the tail. i want the hook as close to the tail as possible. sometimes i will cut the tails off the white perch and have the hook sticking out the back of the bait. in fact i dont use cut bait myself drifting anymore. this looks like a wounded bait fish coming through the water with a good scent trail from the sewing. dont forget to throw a big bait out there. i throw a 8-10 inch bait everytime i go drifting. sometimes it works and sometimes it dont but when it does its good!