ohio dnr should stock flats in the major inland waters

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by katkiller77, Dec 30, 2007.

  1. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    ohio dnr should stock flat heads in the major inland rivers like the Great miami, scioto maumee and Muskingum along with lakes like ceasar creek rocky fork paint creek buckeye dillion lake to name a few. It would help the fishery my word ohio dnr look at west virginia dnr and learn from this. flathead is one the major sport fish in this state and one of the largest fish regularly taken. it would not hurt the ohio dnr to help protect and ensure the survival of this fishery. what do you all think? :big_smile:
     
  2. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Be carefull how loud you say that, the panfish people will get upset, LOL!!!
     

  3. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I think all those waters you mentioned have a good number of flats in them. We have caught nice size flats from all of them.
     
  4. cats gone wild

    cats gone wild Member

    Messages:
    452
    State:
    canal winchester, ohio
    That is'nt going to happen anytime soon I'm afraid. The preservation of flatheads depends on the fishermen who persue these great fish. The " throw it in the back of my truck and show everyone what I caught " mentality has to stop. CPR ( catch, picture, release) is the only way we are going to preserve the flatheads in this state. The Division of Wildlife did put a limit on flatheads this year. I believe you can only keep one fish over 36 ins. per day. But what good does that do? A fish that size is still going to take years to replace. And how do you enforce this regulation when the majority of these fish are taken at night. I fished the Muskingum one day a week this entire season and not one time did I see a Wildlife officer anywhere enforcing this rule. Also it does'nt make any sense to me why rod and reel anglers have a two pole limit, but a person can put out as many setlines as they want to catch flatheads. There are'nt as many large flatheads out there, please take care in preserving these fish.
     
  5. prostreetS10

    prostreetS10 New Member

    Messages:
    898
    State:
    ohio
    That would be awesome if they would stock flats even though there is quite a few in the rivers you listed But i don't really see that happening:sad2:
     
  6. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    I put this out food for thought the major rivers listed have viable flathead fishery but able to make them great fisheries would bring more revenue to the state. ohio become more of a catfishery especially what something native to ohio. this would help in keep large flats in these fisheries also. ohio should think outside the box and make the flathead more trophies accessable for all maybe 3000 fingerling in each major inland ohio river. an idea from a man who like this see this type of fishing grow in the buckeye state
     
  7. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    just speaking my mind happy new year all
     
  8. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    It would be nice, but dont hold your breath.:sad2:
     
  9. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Here are several things to think about before DNR would ever stock flatheads:

    If that watershed a;lready has a "wild" population, they wont stock it because introduced hatchery fish will harm wild population with backyard breeding genes, diseases and why stock into an already balanced ecosystem?

    Flatties would certainly put a huge dent nto a lake or river system that did not already have a major predator in it, The baitfish ( shad,suckers, carp, panfish and bullhead) populations would have to be able to handle it.

    The cost to raise a yearly flathead would be immense since they dont take to pellets well and prefer live bait like muskies which to grow in Ohio to 10" cost over $10 dollars a fish to feed them minnows, golden shiners and goldfish.

    DNR is not looking to add more work since they are loosing headcount and budget moneies every day.

    The state stocks muskies at 1 fish per acre and I am sure a flathead would eat just as much if not more food then a musky so to stock a Ceasers Creek lake for example would take approx 2080 fish @$10 each and you can see where this is going. not gonna happen and never will, the best approach is to keep pushing for improved regulations.

    The rumor mill has the state looking at possibly stocking Blue cats in a few places and I see that as being more succesful since they will raise them just like channels and yes, they do take to feed so that makes them much less costly, and I believe if introduced into preexisting channel cat waters, would compete directly with the channels so be careful what you ask for as if they do introduce Blues into your watershed, I imagine the channel fishing would suffer greatly as each watershed has a certain carrying capacity based on available food sources, fertility and spawning habitat and both channels and blues are similar enough in there habbits to compete in all 3 of those categories.

    With that said, i realistically see DNR only stocking a few rivers like the LMR, Muskingum and the Scioto since they are major watersheds with hardly any migration barriers like dams, I dont see the GMR getting them ( too many dams) and with the Great Lakes advisory committee, I gaurantee they will never get put into anything that drains into Lake Erie. They may get put into a few large deep lakes like East Fork and Ceasers Creek but I dont see much other then that. Just my .02 here folks and I am not a fisheries biologist but I deal with DNR enough to understand how the system works, bottom line is flatties never, blues, maybe in a few limited places......

    Salmonid
     
  10. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    honestly the GMR doesnt need any more flatheads, it might actually have way too many. there are actually stretches that seem to have stunted populations, and the stunted ones tend to clean out other fish like smallies, 'gills, crappies, etc. adding more flatties, or even blues would just make the problem worse due to the lack of shad in the river. now lakes like CJ, Cowan, Grand Lake, and even Indian lake that have an over-aundance of baitfish would support flatties and blues very well.
     
  11. neocats

    neocats New Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    State:
    Steubenvil
    maybe we should consider stocking some baitfish. What a cheap idea.
     
  12. jason454ci

    jason454ci Active Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    State:
    Zanesville, Ohi
    I don't see the ODNR stocking flatheads any time in the near future. Most of the bodies of water that you mentioned already have established flathead populations. Flatheads will naturally reproduce in these waterways so why would they justify stocking any more into them. The species of fish that they do stock typically don't reproduce well naturally in the waterways that they stock them. That is why they put them there.
     
  13. joadb

    joadb Member

    Messages:
    286
    State:
    Clinton, Ohio,
    it would be nice to see the state put some up north so some of us guys up here had a local lake or two we could catchem at.im for stocking them,carfully in selective lakes.there are many lakes suffer from a lack of top of the food chain fish.bluegill and crappie populations can benefit from big cat introduction.cat men and women buy fishing licences(and lots of em)just like muskie and saugeye fishermen do and neither of those fish are known for their high natural reproduction rates(im not sure if saugeyes even can reproduce)and the state plants plenty of them in lakes every year.i think part of the problem is that many in the fishing community view catfish as trash fish and the anglers who pursue them as less than------------say a bass fisherman.we have a responsibility to take care of the fish we love.a flathead has never seen my fillet board and never will.when somebody sees a pic of a flathead i caught they usually say"i bet that was some good eatin"and i proudly say "nope,i cut it loose".catch and release for flatheads!!!!!!!!!!
     
  14. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I dont think the odnr likes flatheads to well, so I dont see them stocking them...I wish they would however! Now I think they might start stocking Blues!
     
  15. zcat

    zcat New Member

    Messages:
    135
    State:
    ohio
    Protection of Flathead Catfish
    This is an e-mail that I sent to the ODNR (wildinfo@dnr.state.oh.us). If you agree with my views I would suggest that you e-mail them as well.

    I would like to see more restrictive harvest of flathead catfish. This is the largest native fish in Ohio, with not much protection from over harvest.

    Why protect more?: Falling nesting habitat, over havest, fish being taking out of public waters and sold to pay lakes, no stocking program, commercial fishing methods for the recreational fisherman like: bank poles, trout lines, and jugs.

    What I would like to happen:: 4 fish limit, stocking, have pay lakes show where all flatheads come from, and to greatly limit the number of bank poles, trout lines and jugs. To limit these methoods would make this more of a recreational sport, then a commercial havest method.

    This is a truly massive fish that needs more protection.
     
  16. katkiller77

    katkiller77 New Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    State:
    dayton ohio
    Exactly i agree with you seeing these guys taking gill nets and harvesting truly wonderful fish especially the big female lays massive amount of eggs is criminal.
     
  17. dookiechrist

    dookiechrist New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    utah
    hello brothers, i dont no know to much about ohio fishin or the monster cats you possess. i do know here in utah the dnr goes through great lenghts trying to provide the absolute best fisheries possible.constant changes to regulations are made along side the constant enforcement of said regulations. gillnet surveys are conducted often to check populations of all fish waters. that is, there is just as much concern for the populations of the forage fish as there predatory fish. we have had in many different circumstances where the number of predatory gets so large that there simply just isnt enough food to support them. this greatly effects the QUALITY of fishing. in such circumstances regulations are changed in a way to help increase numbers of forage fish( in many waters here that would be yellow perch) ,that is, ALL YELLOW PERCH ARE TO BE IMMEDIATELY RELEASED. at the same time regulations are made so that more predatory fish are harvested but normally with size restrctions (THROW BACK THE BIGGUNS). all in all there is a delicate balance that needs to be maintained. and my hats off to all of you who practice cpr . you respect the fisheries as well as the age and survival of YOUR fish..
     
  18. dookiechrist

    dookiechrist New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    utah
    hello brothers, i dont no know to much about ohio fishin or the monster cats you possess. i do know here in utah the dnr goes through great lenghts trying to provide the absolute best fisheries possible.constant changes to regulations are made along side the constant enforcement of said regulations. gillnet surveys are conducted often to check populations of all fish waters. that is, there is just as much concern for the populations of the forage fish as there predatory fish. we have had in many different circumstances where the number of predatory gets so large that there simply just isnt enough food to support them. this greatly effects the QUALITY of fishing. in such circumstances regulations are changed in a way to help increase numbers of forage fish( in many waters here that would be yellow perch) ,that is, ALL YELLOW PERCH ARE TO BE IMMEDIATELY RELEASED. at the same time regulations are made so that more predatory fish are harvested but normally with size restrctions (THROW BACK THE BIGGUNS). all in all there is a delicate balance that needs to be maintained. and my hats off to all of you who practice cpr . you respect the fisheries as well as the age and survival of YOUR fish.. give thanx