noodling?

Discussion in 'LOCAL KANSAS TALK' started by boombalaty, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. boombalaty

    boombalaty New Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    State:
    Kansas
    Have any of you Kansas guys done any noodling? I kinda am interested in giving it a try. :eek:oooh:
     
  2. andrew76

    andrew76 New Member

    Messages:
    457
    State:
    southwest ohio
    Dont let the turtles chew off your hand. :eek:oooh::smile2:
     

  3. boombalaty

    boombalaty New Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    State:
    Kansas
    LOL my wife says she wants to try it too. We'll see how that goes. She just started baiting her own hooks with shad and gills but she thinks she wants to put her hand in a big cats mouth.....:eek:oooh:
     
  4. andrew76

    andrew76 New Member

    Messages:
    457
    State:
    southwest ohio
    not with those pretty hands.:smile2:
     
  5. kansas_catman_16

    kansas_catman_16 New Member

    Messages:
    253
    State:
    Kansas
    i wanna try but after my dad told me that story of one of his friends grabbing a big snake:crazy: in louisiana noodling i dnt think i wanna try :eek:oooh::roll_eyes::smile2:
     
  6. River Outlaw

    River Outlaw New Member

    Messages:
    2,836
    State:
    Topeka, Kansas,
    Kyle can give ya the ins and outs on it. he's a noodler from waaaaaaay back. :roll_eyes:
     
  7. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    I've done it, and we have a great time. This is my first year doing it in Kansas, but I run with some guys that have been doing it a long time. Here in Kansas we don't have water moccasins to worry about, and I'm not real worried about turtles, but you do have to watch out for beaver and muskrats. They'll hurt you if you corner one. There are only two rivers open for it and you have to have a special noodling permit which runs like 30 bucks. If you wanna try it, I say go ahead, but never go alone, and try to tag along with someone who has done it before. There is safety in numbers. Be smart and you should be alright. I think one thing that sets my group apart from most noodlers is that we release almost everything we pull. Keep in mind that you are targeting big mature fish on the nest. We do it for the challenge and the fun of it, not for the meat, so we have no reason to keep anything (especially when I already have a freezer full of channel cats). Noodling is a controversial sport. Some people swear that pulling a big fish, and releasing it will cause it to abandon the nest. I don't think this is the case, but there hasn't been alot of research done on the matter. When we pull one, we get it up, get a picture, let it go, and we don't touch that hole again for the rest of the year. More often than not they swim right back in. I'd imagine that if you were to pull the same fish four or five times in a season that it could likely abandon the nest so that's why we only hit it once. Some people swear by gloves, others don't (I don't where them). The general consensus on the matter is that if you want to wear gloves while noodling, make sure they are made of a durable, smooth material to prevent them getting snagged on anything. And when you are grabbing, shoot for the bottom lip instead of a gill plate, because if any part of the gills are damaged the chances of the fish not recovering are pretty high. All that said, just be careful, get your permit, and though you are free to do whatever you want, I recommend catch and release. Have fun.
     
  8. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
    Matt, It's your decision, and I won't in any way knock you or give you a hard time for trying it, but I do want to suggest an interesting read from the Missouri Department of Conservation on the impacts of noodling on flathead catfish populations: http://mdc.mo.gov/fish/sport/catfish/noodling.htm
     
  9. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    Its not a good way to preserve our sport for the future. THOUSANDS of fish loose a chance when they are pulled of the nest.
    Most noodled fish are BIG ones too.
    Grab a pole, you'll feel better about yourself.:wink::smile2:j/k
    It aint like Girls Gone Grabblin where they are pullin them outta barrells and bath tubs. You stick your hand in a cut bank or a hollow log to do it the real way.
    I highly doubt your wife will want to if she just started baiting her hook.:smile2:
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  10. Gamblen

    Gamblen New Member

    Messages:
    450
    State:
    Kansas City, KS
    I never done it. They say it takes 4 people to noddle. 2 lookouts, 1 with a rope tied around his waist and 1 to hold the other end of the rope. Anyone comes up missing, the fish won, lol
     
  11. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    I wish Kansas never made it legal. What were they thinking?:embarassed:
    Probably an effort to deplete flatheads to save the stupid ba$$.:smile2:
     
  12. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    Kyle, I'm not even sure how popular it is up here. I've been out several times since the season started and have never once seen anyone else anywhere on the Ark. As for the Kaw, I don't know what's going on up there, but I'm thinking the Ark isn't getting a whole lot of noodling pressure. I'd be interested in knowing the number of permits the state has even sold.
     
  13. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    I know its popular down by Oxford and it was way before they started selling permits. People will do it regardless. I just dont think its a good idea to encourage it, which is almost what they are doing.
    They should have learned from MO's study.
     
  14. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    MO's study was based on the numbers of catfish that are kept, I don't think hardly any official studies have been done on the fish that are caught and released. Everything I've seen/heard/experienced point to the fact that a fish that is immediately released unharmed goes straight back to the nest. That said, I agree that there is a problem with big mature fish that are kept in high numbers, and I wish more noodlers would turn to the C.P.R. side of things.
     
  15. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    if someone wants to noodle let them be your extreeme net man and wade out there and land your fish:wink:
     
  16. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    1 out of 100 release them.:sad2: Probably less than that.
    Im glad that you did, the Ark doesnt need any more exploitation.
     
  17. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    You're right about that. The problem with education is that some people refuse to be educated. It's hard to turn a meat fisherman into a catch and release guy, but it can be done.
     
  18. arkrivercatman

    arkrivercatman New Member

    Messages:
    4,472
    State:
    KS
    I think noodling is more about being macho than it is about meat.
    Bragging rights as well.
    Ill stick with my pole and line. I dont get many big ones but when I do I feel I accompished something. The odds are in the fish's favor with rod and reel.
     
  19. boombalaty

    boombalaty New Member

    Messages:
    1,536
    State:
    Kansas
    I would release all the fish. I dont want to contribute to the destruction of our fishing waters. I just thought it would be neat to try once or twice.
     
  20. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    For alot guys, you are probably right, they do it just to say they do. Some people (granted, fewer, but they exist) actually enjoy it as a sport, another method of catching fish no different than rod and reel, limblining, trotlinng, or anything else. I can promise you that it's much more challenging than it seems. The odds are in the fish's favor either way. Heck, I think trotlining more than anything (short of hoopnets or traps) puts the ball in the fisherman's court. That's not to say I'm against trotlining, so don't take it that way. I guess all I'm trying to say is that no matter which way you choose to pursue fish, the most important thing in the end is the well being of the population as a whole, which means that no matter whether you grab, hook, or setline a sexually mature flathead (or any fish for that matter), that it's in the best interest of the species to release it so it can continue the reproductive cycle and make lots of baby flatties. Of course that's just my opinion.