Noob Bowhunter

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by ColtsFan317, Nov 29, 2009.

  1. ColtsFan317

    ColtsFan317 New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Indpls,IN
    Im looking to get into bowhunting, never been before but from what i hear from friends im sure ill love to do it. I was wondering if you guys could point me into a direction that i could get some good info about the sport and where to get a good beginners bow. I plan on starting to hunt next year and practice all the time up till that point. Thanks for any help
     
  2. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    Get a Hoyt lifetime garuntee on all parts and one of the best bows on the market.
     

  3. ColtsFan317

    ColtsFan317 New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Indpls,IN
    thanks for the info im gonna check out their site, im kinda on a budget just because im just now getting into it once i get good ill go for the big name brand
     
  4. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

    Messages:
    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    best thing for you to do is go to your local bow shops and look for a used Hoyt, Mathews, PSE they are all good brands. my buddy approached me the same way this past spring and thats exactly what i told and helped him do. I was in the local shop and a guy had traded a Mathews Switch Back in with all the extras, sights, stabilizer, 6 arrows w/ broad heads, rest, ect. for $600 he had a $1000+ set up. now it was a good deal, and for most people starting out that is the way i would point you. you may not buy the newest bow on the market, but if you learn with the older style then why you get a newer one you will be even better. also, when you buy your bow you will get a chance to see if you even have the time to be a bow hunter, it is a different sport altogether from gun hunting. a gun hunter can set up and have a circle drawn around him of over 500 yds and still kill. a bow hunter has to get with in 40 and that is pushing it. also after you buy your first bow, you will get to know what you like and dont like about it. that will give you a better starting place. just remember a bow IS NOT like a Gun. if i sight your gun in on a shooting rest, it will shoot the same when you are on the rest. with a bow there are so many factors to where a bow hits, that every bow is differnt for every person. things like anchor point, release style, etc, etc. all factor into the way your bow will shoot as you aim it. like i said goto the local bow shops have them give you some measurements so that you can get the right size, then start looking for a good used bow. Stay away from the internet, you dont know what you are getting in a used bow. last thing, i would buy a bow that you will plan on hunting with for a couple of years. that way you aren't buying a 10 year old bow, then next season you want a modern style. so try to get one with the modern elements, so that you aren't wanting to up grade a year later costing you more than needed. you are going to have more expenses bow hunting than gun hunting. things from broad heads to anti scent and camo. JMO, best of luck to you...
     
  5. flathead willie

    flathead willie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,241
    State:
    Virginia
    You've already gotten good advice on equipment, however, bow hunting is more about the HUNTING and less about the SHOOTING. When I started, I could shoot my recurve real well, but I soon found out that I didn't know squat about a Whitetail Deer or how to get close to them. Study everything you can find on the deer; books, magazines, videos, DVDs, talk to other hunters, and learn how to scout. It doesn't take a $1,000 bow to kill a deer. It takes stealth and a knowledge of deer, their habits, and their habitat. Good luck!
     
  6. calogan

    calogan New Member

    Messages:
    241
    State:
    Iowa
    He's absolutly correct
     
  7. dieselcat

    dieselcat New Member

    Messages:
    406
    State:
    Washington, Mis
    Very well put,very good advice to follow!
     
  8. ColtsFan317

    ColtsFan317 New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Indpls,IN
    see thats the whole reason im getting into it, i think if id get a deer with a bow it requires alot more time in effort and id feel very proud about it, it kind of makes you feel like an old cowboy or indian living off the land thanks alot guys for all the info hopefully i can get strted soon and practice so by the time next year ill know a little bit about what im doin
     
  9. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

    Messages:
    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    Willie is 100% correct, being able to make a good shot is only part of the equation. also knowing your limitations is much more important bow hunting. just because you can hit a target at 60 yds does not mean you should shoot at a deer 60 yds away. my friends and i frequently shoot at targets 80+ yds away, but i would never shoot at a target that far. knowing your equipment is part of that equation too. your bow may shoot hard and fast enough to kill effectively at 40 yds and mine may be limited to 30yd shots.
     
  10. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    I too agree with the solid advise Billie gave. I've had several new bows and currently shoot an old PSE that i got about 15 yrs. ago. It's quiet, i can shoot it well and have had good luck with it. Woodsmanship is of far greater importance to me than all the new stuff on the market. Knowing which tree to place the stand often means the difference in getting a shot or just watchin deer. Alot of gun hunters get sloppy and spit copenhagen on the ground and get by with it, bowhunters can't make these mistakes and be sussessful. M.R. James published a book years ago called the bowhunters journal and it was very helpful when i started. I'm certain there are more updated copies available but my point is being able to tune your bow and arrows also is essential. Find someone who knows how to shoot and get them to teach you correctly. Alot easier than forming bad habits from the start and then trying to break them. I made this mistake bowhunting and playin golf both. UN-learning is alot harder than learning correctly. Good luck and hope you enjoy it. Lots of good bowhunters here that will gladly help a guy out.
     
  11. ColtsFan317

    ColtsFan317 New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Indpls,IN
    is there any good eductional dvds out there that goes over the basics and shows you the things that you need to know ive been hunting once my whole life and was alot younger then and didnt really like the concept of sitting all day, but now that im older ive never been more anxious to get out there and give it another try its all ive been talking about for the last month(i need something to do when the flatheads arnt biting:smile2:) my gf is getting annoyed by it lol but the shows on tv usually have shotguns i want to see a good video of bowhunting
     
  12. bnt55

    bnt55 New Member

    Messages:
    640
    State:
    Northern KY
    Good luck on your new hobby, bowhunting is extremely fun and frustrating at the same time. If you have ever been deer hunting with a gun then you already have the foundation to get started bowhunting...now all you have to do is make a good shot on a very nervous and intuitive animal by drawing back a 70 lb bow while shaking like a leaf, sighting your pins on that little crease made by the front leg and the ribs all the while hoping you are holding the realease in your correct anchor point on your frozen face...oh and dont misjudge the yardage especially when you have tunnel vision on a mature buck that seems intent on walking through every arrow deflecting shrub nearby. Other then these minor details bowhunting is a breeze!

    Just a quick fyi craigslist has alot of bows for sale this time of year sometimes for less than a hundred bucks for a name brand compound. Once you find yourself a decent bow, take it to a pro shop to get set up and let them watch you shoot a couple of arrows....after that it's up to you to shoot as much as you can starting at 10 yards stepping back as you become confident in your new bow. Remember to vary your yardages to keep your mind sharp on judging distances and practice, practice, practice and practice. You will naturally gravitate to bowhunting websites and magazines which will give an idea of how to go about your new sport effectively however it will be the time in the field and stand that will sharpen your skills, especially the things you do wrong....you will learn grasshopper, don't make it too hard at first luck favors the ignorant.:wink:

    Remember there are no stupid questions so ask, we have all been there!

    Bill
     
  13. ColtsFan317

    ColtsFan317 New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Indpls,IN
    sounds really easy why doesnt everyone bowhunt lol thanks everyone for all the info ive gotten im sure ill be on here alot to ask more questions i cant stand not knowing every trick out there but thanks again for all the help evrybody
     
  14. bownero

    bownero New Member

    Messages:
    3,137
    State:
    Hastings, Ne.
    Great advice Billie. One thing I would like to add is, please steer away from buying a bow from Cabelas or Bass Pro!! Reason is, most of the so called Pro Shop techs aren't nearly as knowledgeable, as going to a reputable Pro Shop and having a bow setup correctly for you. I learned the hard way when I purchased my first bow from Cabelas. Love the store, but the bow wasn't setup correctly and it was a nightmare for me being a beginner. Having the right draw length and weight will greatly benefit you for ease of shooting and make it an enjoyment!!

    Welcome to the sport of Archery!! It's a blast!! Any questions you might have, please ask away!! BOC has some pretty knowledgeable arrow slingers on here!! I'll do my best too to help ya!!:big_smile: