"No Snag" or "Flat Spoon" Sinkers

Discussion in 'Sinker Making Institute' started by Cornhusker, Jan 14, 2007.

  1. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker New Member

    Messages:
    94
    State:
    Lancaster, Ohio
    “No Snag” or “Flat Spoon” Sinkers

    The “No Snag”, also called “Flat Spoon” sinkers usually carry the same description when listed in a catalog. “No Snag Sinkers derive their name from their tendency to rise above the bottom and glide over snags when retrieved”.

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    I can remember molding these sinkers from tire weights in the mid 50’s. They have been around a long time, but have never been recognized as the sinker they are. Seldom seen on the self in the tackle shops, I continue to mold my own. They are available from fishing tackle catalogs. It is the only sinker, over 3/8 oz, I have used for 45 years. It’s design does bring it off the bottom quickly upon retrieve. I suffer fewer snags than other fishermen fishing nearby. If I do hit a snag, pulling the line tight and then letting the line go completely slack several times will very often let the sinker flutter down and clear the snag. Where river fishermen are using 3 oz and larger egg sinkers, I can hold with 2 oz. The design of the No Snag sinker forces the line to drag it along the bottom. It will not roll and it lays flat out of the force of the water. Some fishermen tell me that you have to have a hole through the center of the sinker for your line on a slip rig. I pass my line through the large eye with well rounded edges that do not cut my line and let the swivel act as the stop, no bead needed. In swift current they can begin to spin causing difficulty with line and baits depending upon how you rig them. These sinkers are a bit cheaper than the egg and a fair amount cheaper than the bass casting sinkers.

    I find it very odd that this sinker is good enough to be around and still manufactured for that many years and yet so few shops sell them.


    I have had several molds over the years. The one I have currently is by far the best quality and produces the best quality sinker. It is made by “Do-it Lure & Sinker Molds”. The internet address for the “Do-it Lure & Sinker Molds” is http://www.do-itmolds.com/
     
  2. curdog

    curdog New Member

    Messages:
    896
    State:
    Sheridan, Arkansas
    Darrel I don't Know if I got this variation of the Flat Spoon Design from the BOC forums or what. But tryed using a regular Teaspoon as a mold. Poured the lead in the teaspoon and drilled a hole in the little end and smoothed the hole where it would not cut the line. If you want more weight get a bigger spoon.
    If you don't have the money for a store bought mold this works just as good.
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Yep, that's how I made some of my first sinkers, back in the mid 1950s. But an even better 'no-snag' sinker is one that is long and skinny. There are a number of ways to make these:
    1. Put lead or steel balls inside plastic tubing. Seal both ends with hot glue, inserting a piece of wire in one end to attach the line to the sinker.
    2. Use some scrap pieces of pipe, tubing, or even an old TV antenna as a mold. Cut to length; seal the bottom end; pour full of lead; insert a wire connector in the open end before the lead hardens. To make 10 ounce sinkers, I once used aluminum tubes that cigars came in--they worked great.
    3. You can also simply make a hole in a bucket of sand, or drill a hole in scrap wood to make a mold.
    4. Don't have facilities for melting lead yet? Cut rebar into whatever lengths you need to get the weight you want, using small diameter rebar for smaller weights, and larger diameter rebar for heavier weights. You don't need your sinker to be over about 12"-15" long.
    5. If you don't need too much weight, you can even use a nail. I use 16p or 20p nails as weights for my juglines.
     
  4. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Guess it is just a technicality, but when you pour lead into a spoon your not making a true no-snag sinker. The actual no-snag sinker has a cavity on one side which cups water when retrieved, causing the sinker to rise from the bottom. A spoon sinker allows you to have a weight on you line similar to the no-snag, but the only planing characteristics it has is its shape. It won't rise as fast and as far as the actual no-snag sinker. Now saying all that, I don't know f the fish care if the rig they were caught on was a true no-snag sinker or not. LOL I would hazard a guess to say these sinkers should be referred to as "spoon" sinkers. That way we keep apples and oranges separated.
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    You can get your 'cup' on the flat side by hitting it with a ball-peen hammer, or by pushing another empty spoon into the surface of the melted lead and holding it there till the lead cools. If you use a 'shallow' dish spoon rather than a 'deep dish' spoon, you probably won't have to do this.
     
  6. misterwhisker

    misterwhisker New Member

    Messages:
    1,056
    State:
    T. Bowl
    Im thinking that the spoon sinker would be great for drifting.
    I believe it would have more control and balance in the water.
    Most definitely will try it out
     
  7. Welder

    Welder New Member

    Messages:
    4,834
    State:
    Missouri
    What I did was bend coat hangers in lil U shapes about a 1/4 inch across and 1 inch long and bend one leg out and cut it off so you get a U' shape. I then put it in the table spoon with the wire u sticking out to make a eye and poured the lead. It worked awsome as a drifting sinker in current on a 3 way rig but tended to spinn when reeled in popping it off the bottom good. I havent made any in 9 years being I got some bankweight molds and pour them 90% the time.