Night Fisherman

Discussion in 'LOCAL MICHIGAN TALK' started by Northstar, Jul 6, 2009.

  1. Northstar

    Northstar New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Michigan
    Night Fisherman, Lights would be a great idea. You are not the only person on the river. Somebody almost had a bad night. There are boats out there that are big and fast and drivers that know the river. Not all boats idle around at night. I would prefer to spend my time fishing for catfish instead of looking for dead bodies.:wink:
     
  2. bream reaper

    bream reaper New Member

    Messages:
    460
    State:
    Indiana
    What is the night-time rule in MI, is it "idle" only? That's too slow if you ask me. Nav lights are for a reason...
     

  3. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    Isn't it against the law to run without lights at night? A red one on the front and a green one on the back, or something like that, elevated on poles. I don't remember exactly, but I remember having to outfit my boat with clamp on lights when I night fished, which are available anywhere marine equipment is sold. I am pretty sure there is a law, I'd have to look it up.

    People should be required to take Boater Safety before they can run boats in my opinion. It was an optional class taught at our Jr High when I was young. I see too many boaters acting poorly, they don't know the etiquette.
     
  4. CatHunter24

    CatHunter24 New Member

    Messages:
    715
    State:
    Dayton, Ohio
    you must display navigation lights and a rear anchor light. In ohio at least, not sure about michigan laws, it is illegal to run lights up front like headlamps to see the river as it blinds other boats and negates the navigation lighting system. Ohio has under 10 mph at night on state park lakes, but the Ohio River and Lake Erie are unrestricted. You can use a spot light to look around, but i heard that you are not supposed to shine it on the water and run with it, but instead use it for looking at the bank etc.
     
  5. bwanatony

    bwanatony New Member

    Messages:
    580
    State:
    Grand River Valley, Weste
    I just met a Kent County (MI) Marine Patrol Officer on Lincoln Lake a few nights ago. He had no problems with us, so he headed off to get some bowfishermen who were motoring around with spot lights on, run by a generator. No spot lights allowed on while underway.
    Rules are like this:
    At anchor, you must have a white stern light on at "dusk", visible from all sides.
    Under way, you must have a bow light (red/starboard, green/port, I believe) and a white stern light.
    Good rules to follow for safety, as well as staying out of trouble with the law.
    Incidently, you may have beer in your boat, and you can have twice the blood alcohol level in a boat than you can in a car.
    Still, good idea to stay sober on the water, especially in the dark.
    T
     
  6. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    You're right, I had a white one, a green one, and a red one. They were cheapo $8 lights that clamped on, run by AA batteries. I gave them to the guy who bought my boat.
     
  7. Northstar

    Northstar New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Michigan
    I know the rules and regs. of our waterways. I really don't care how closely you fallow them. Just put some kind of light in you boat to signal others. I will use lights in my boat how I see fit. I use running lights in my boat because it is safer. I feel the no spotlight rule is a bunch of BS.
    Lakefront property owners think they own the water to. The same people complaining about lights on the lake/river at night are the same people that bitch about duck hunters. If they don't like it maybe they should move. Most of these people are the ones from the big cities driving up the property values. Our waterways are there to be used not looked at from the breakfast nook.
     
  8. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    In many states the riverfront property owner do own the rivers too. We are lucky in Michigan to have the laws we do concerning water usage. Most people I know who live on lakes or rivers don't even fish, maybe they drive fast boats pulling skiers or whatever. That's their right, just as much as it's ours to fish. If I lived on a lake or river and had a spotlight carelessly shined on my house at night from some boater shining it all around I'd probably be upset. I don't boat at night so I don't have an opinion about the spotlight rule, other than my gut reaction, and the opinion of friends who live on a river.
     
  9. CatfishHateMe

    CatfishHateMe New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Il

    I believe that the most a river front property owner can own is the land out the the middle of the river, like the bottem of the river, not the water, therefore they do not own the "river". Most places they just own up to the high water mark. I dont think theres a single state that the property owner can own water... So its just as much yours as anybodys. Dont shine spotlights at peoples houses by any means but you have to do what you have to do to be safe. I wont go for anyone "owning", or even thinking they own, the river that Ive fished and used since I was a little kid. Ever.
     
  10. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    Lights are a must on the water at night. People are still going to drive fast on the water day or nights, so why wouldnt you want them to see you. I want someone to see me before its too late. I agree I go out to fish for fish not bodies. Good Post.
     
  11. DLB-in-GR

    DLB-in-GR New Member

    Messages:
    490
    State:
    MI
    I thought it was Texas where you needed the landowner's permission to float down "his" section of river. I might be wrong. In Michigan if you can float a boat in it, or wade in it, and it is public accessible, you can go in it, and if there is a blockage and you need to go on land to get around that, you are allowed without it being considered trespassing. I remember reading an article in Catfish Gold about some people who went canoeing down a long stretch of river in Texas for several days and had to get many landowners' permissions to do that because the river passed through private property.
     
  12. CatfishHateMe

    CatfishHateMe New Member

    Messages:
    669
    State:
    Il
    I would be quite angry if that was the case here, water is moving, its not "property".
     
  13. bwanatony

    bwanatony New Member

    Messages:
    580
    State:
    Grand River Valley, Weste
    I'm not sure, but I think the no-spotlight-while-moving rule is to keep you from blinding other boaters. While I can see the point, I'm sure sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't.
    Just goes to show that courtesy and common sense are better than any law.
     
  14. Northstar

    Northstar New Member

    Messages:
    202
    State:
    Michigan
    I do shut the lights down when another boat is seen. As for the spotlights. There are no homes on the water in 90% of the rivers I fish. There is a curve on the road in front of my house, when a car passes it sheds light in my home. I don't get upset. A train also passes nere my home. A river is used as travel corador just like a road. The rules should not change just because on is used more then the other. Like I said if you don't like people in you back yard move or get a bigger back yard.
     
  15. douglasd

    douglasd New Member

    Messages:
    4
    State:
    Michigan
    Yes, it is. At anchor, you must have a white light that can been seen from all angles. While underway, you must have that, plus a red port side light and a green starboard light. This applies from sunset to sun-up, and applies to any powered boat, even electric trolling motors. Also, the white light must be higher than the red & green lights.

    These red and green lights tell you which boat is to "give way" to the other, etc. If you can see only his green light, you can stay on course & he has to give way. If you see only his red light, you have to give way. If you see both, that means you are coming at him head-on, and you both have to give way. If you see only his white light, you are behind him and overtaking him and you have to give way.

    See the link: http://www.boat-ed.com/mi/course/p4-9_navlights.htm
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2009