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Discussion in 'Sinker Making Institute' started by kyledbarnes, Dec 24, 2008.

  1. kyledbarnes

    kyledbarnes New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    south carolina
    ive never made my own sinkers before but i would like to get started, is it cheaper to make your own? tell me all i need to know
     
  2. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,787
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    making your own is lots cheeper than buying and as far as making goes go to the boc libury and theres plenty of info there to help you learn all you need to know.
     

  3. joer

    joer New Member

    Messages:
    335
    State:
    columbiaMo
    kyle i have decided to start making our own weights due to the retail cost. one way we r going to start doing this is by getting your fishing buddies together. every one buys a different mold and we we all put in for the lead.

    this way you can make several different weights and one person doesnt have to buy all the molds. then you have a sinker making party. luckly for me i have a friend with a kettle so the rest of us will supply the rest.

    hope this helps.
     
  4. catfish kenny

    catfish kenny New Member

    Messages:
    6,064
    State:
    Iowa
    I personaley have 6 molds and a large pot ...Not sure what I have invested but I know its a few hundred....I have alot of people that fish with me and if yer planning fer the long haul it is gonna be cheaper in the long run,just me and Lilly giong out we get in snagg central we loose alot of lead...I cant see paying 1 buck a sinker fer them big ones I will sling nuts & bolts. first...(.the cost of sinkers is outragious)....or make my own:big_smile:
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Depends on how much you spend on sinkers of a particular type you go through in a year, unless you get with someone who already has a mold to make that particular size & type. I haven't priced them recently, but I think the Do-It molds run about $30-$35 each. If you figure you can make sinkers for about half what they cost at the bait shop, you can easily decide whether or not to invest in a particular mold. You can spend quite a bit for a production lead furnace, or you can go the cheap way, like I do. For a pot, I use a heavy steel saucepan with a handle on each side. (Makes lifting the heavy weight a lot easier.) There's nothing wrong with using an old pot with a worn-out nonstick surface, and you can find one for little or nothing. For a skimmer, all you need is a big spoon. Screw the handle of the spoon to a piece of wood so you don't have to touch the hot metal. While it is possible to fabricate your own ladle, that's something I'd recommend that you buy. When you are lifting and moving melted lead, you don't want to take any chances. Some people like to melt all their lead down so they can make it into ingots of clean lead, but unless you have a production pot, there's no real need to go to the trouble of melting the lead twice. I just dump the scrap lead into my pot, let it melt, then scrape off the junk that floats to the top. That's what the big spoon is for. There are lots of possibilities for a heat source. I've used an old electric hotplate, the kitchen stove, a propane campstove, and the burner from my turkey roaster. The turkey roaster burner probably melts the pot of lead faster than any of the other heat sources I've used.

    KEEP YOUR MOLDS DRY! THE LEAST BIT OF MOISTURE INSIDE THE MOLD WHEN YOU POUR IN THE MELTED LEAD WILL CAUSE AN EXPLOSION, SPRAYING MELTED LEAD EVERYWHERE! Been there, done that.