Newby NIMBY disease

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by jolie, Jan 27, 2009.

  1. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    January is always a chance to look back a little and some recent questions on the NY board have me reminiscing a little about my own recent efforts at becoming a catter.

    Newby NIMBY (aka Not-In-My-Backyard) disease is a feeling that despite the collection of knowledge and experience here, that out away from the midwest and the south, People have never even Heard of your local waters, nonetheless be able to give any practical suggestions, Where to start looking...

    Its actually a pretty depressing feeling and I believe other people are feeling when they say they are lonely catters and answer their own posts a few days later with something like "Is there ANYone here that can help me find a good local hotspot".

    if you name your local spot and find that people haven't even heard of the rivers and lakes around you (nevertheless be able to name any good places to start ) and there's no regular BOC brother within 100 miles, your likely to feel pretty bummed out. Perhaps after a brief post or two, you feel insolated and don't come back to the site. I'm convinced this has happened to many of the 20,000+ users. Of course When THEY LEAVE, there's even less people to give practical advice and a begginners start to someone new.

    Anyway, I've written a little article about it, and hopefully it gets past the past the editors as a valuable contribution to the library. While I admit it contain no great gem for serious or trophy catters... I think week by week quite a few people come and then leave this forum due to the Newby NIMBY feeling (or disease).

    what I am wondering is whether other people have felt this way?? Perhaps even someone in a pretty cat crazed state COULD feel a little lonely and confused if they live in an old of the corner area of the state or if the few serious catters in their area are say, diehard trophy flatheaders and they are a weekend wariors after a channel or two?

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Also feel free to Add Advice to someone that feels this way, Please! I know people need to be encouraged after they've burned a long week or two without success in search of whiskers, and no one in the BOC can give them any clues about where they ought to concentrate (beyond hints)...

    If the article is approved. I have recorded my suggestions on who to deal with this feeling. and It is my STRONG conviction that both the BOC and the angler are better for sticking through it and fishing and posting.
     
  2. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    i think it dosent matter where you live you have to do your homework,getting maps and things like that will help find, the best places to fish,that will at least give you a start.And KEEP ASKING QUESTIONS! The only dumb question is the one not asked.
     

  3. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    Well from the looks of it, Not too many people have felt that way (or at least NOT TOO many people will admit to having felt):tounge_out:

    Practically speaking most people on a catfish site, already have some kind of experience with the fish and/or have enough information to start guessing.

    Judging the silence, its not likely to pass the editors as an article- Oh well.

    I hold to it that some people seem to have felt that , and they were Much more likely to Lurk and leave.

    ------------------------------------------

    more generally, of course I'm sure everybody is interested in improving technique, equiptment, etc. Its one motivation for coming here!!

    I'm really NOT just talking about feeling like your just beginning or know very little about catfish (That would JUST be a "NEWBY" feeling)

    but I hold to it, that for those of us, who have started looking for whiskers in a place, where they are talked about in tackle shops as unwanted pests AND where the internet contains little to no practical advice where to go; they Newby feeling IS Worse. and a few skunks can make you feel as if you just can't catch them in your part of the world.


    As for me, now I'm feeling confident but not arrogant. I don't catch a lot or the biggest and I'm sure I have ALOT to learn. but I've caught them this year; and I have a few guidelines that help me decide what to do. I need to become more flexible. I like to fish with BOC brothers and extend a extra measure of empathy to people in states; where there's rarely a post every 30 days.

    You can be sure, I'll drop the Acronym(which I THOUGHT WAS clever:smile2::smile2::smile2:) to someone that I think is feeling this way... but prolly not much to the big bluecat guys in 'ssippi. I don't doubt they gained your skills tediously maybe over decades (and hats off for that, of course)- but I'm thinking others never struggled as hard as I did, just to catch a 2# channel. which is probably pretty darn simple to do, in the midwest of the south.
     
  4. readingcatfisher

    readingcatfisher New Member

    Messages:
    3,748
    State:
    Berks coun
    One of the best tools anyone has put me on is Windows Live Maps after you figure out how to use it and mess around with it it is a very helpful tool to look at terrain and depths cover and bends,pass that along to everyone you can it works to find spots
     
  5. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    Thank you, true enough. I'm still apreciative for what Justin (DieselCAT) did, one summer night; in checking out the local river for likely spots.

    Did you know I caught my PB from one of his spots???:wink:

    sometimes, we can still help with spots and places, even if we've never been to the local river.

    PS. I posted the article, in NY local, cuz it was some conversations over there that reminded me of this feeling that I'd had. Sometimes, you'll see threads in the west that go, something like "Anyone catfishing in Utah (or wherever)" I'm almost sure they're feeling the same thing...
     
  6. readingcatfisher

    readingcatfisher New Member

    Messages:
    3,748
    State:
    Berks coun
    Same goes for me ,Lenny offered to take me out in his boat and basically changed my whole outlook on catfishing I used to use medium action rods and reels and never even seen an octopus circle hook 8/0 I used size 1 eagle claw baitholders my whole life I never targeted flatheads so I had a bit of shopping to do I picked up 2 king kat mh 7' rods 2 okuma baitfeeder reels and enough hooks to last a season or 2 now I bought my wife a zebco 808 combo and my son wants a hawg seeker which are both plenty strong enough for flats but a few trips with Lenny and meeting Ken changed my whole idea of catfishing just like that.
     
  7. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    So far i've never fished the north or northeast, and therefore any input you got from me would simply be pure speculation. I'll be more than willing to share what i know about fishing here in the south. About any body of water here holds catfish and catching them isn't rocket science either. I do know this, i'll never catch as big of smallmouth bass as you guys catch.:confused2: i love to fish for the brownies but we simply don't have the numbers. Same as other species in your area, they are un-heard of here. Not alot of professional hockey players or ice skaters here either. Boils down to we can only catch or kill whats there. Or be fortunate enuff to go to them. I wanna shoot a moose but i'm limited to whitetail for the time being. Good luck Jason. If cats are there and you put in your time and efforts, you'll catch em.
     
  8. oklahoma caveman

    oklahoma caveman New Member

    Messages:
    114
    State:
    oklahoma
    well man i know of what you speak. i live in a great catfishin state. but there are almost no ppl on here even remotely close. i posted a thread when i first joined, and it took forever for someone to reply. but i stuck around for the info anyway, and have since made new friends and have had a very pleasent experience here. regardless of if anybody is from your area or not, if you are interested in anything catfishing then this is the place to be. more info and knowledge on this site than i ever thought possible
     
  9. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Part of me is envious.

    I would welcome the opportunity to do a little pioneering on water that doesnt have limblines on every branch, and trotlines on every snag.
     
  10. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    well, thats an interesting take...but your right there IS another way to look at it....

    I've gotten over through much of these feelings and this year have been more resolved to pioneer even more this year. So, yes,It is kind of exciting in a way, to BE the catter, even the sole expert of the mighty whiskers. (Although I can't Honestly claim that title yet (even locally); as I have SO much to learn!)

    I really want to continue to learn and grow; bring the techniques of the hard fished midwest and south to local waters. Fish up here are sparse, but then I think being unpressured they're niave and predictable; given time, patience, and persistance I could imagine doing pretty darn good after a few years.... maybe no 80# cats..but there is 20# channels locally, for sure and somewhere just downstream starts the flatheads (and they get up towards 40# in PA).

    Certainly, the joy out of being a pioneer and welcoming/helping new members to little heard of corners of catfish country is the big reward for Alot of guesswork/persistance, and being commited to STAY on the BOC!:smile2:
     
  11. Swishersweet

    Swishersweet New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Bourbonnais, Illinois
    If you are going to be a serious catter, be prepared to fish mostly alone. I consider myself a serious catter. I take a scientific approach to catfishing. I have read all I can find so that I understand the various catfish in their environment and the seasonal and life movements of them. My gear and boat are fine tuned for maximum advantage. I work hard at catfishing, while I'm fishing. I would say, from my observations, that most people are content to park at a bridge, bring out a cooler and lawn chairs, cast out a prepared bait and sit there and wait for a bite. I will hike or boat to high percentage areas that I have located and actively search for catfish. If the bite is not happening, I will move until I locate feeding fish. I spend considerable amounts of time catching bait and fine tuning my terminal tackle. My style of fishing is not the relaxed sitting patiently waiting for a bite, but rather an aggressive approach to getting on to the fish. Without bragging, my catch percentages are usually pretty decent.

    I've catfished with other people and have not yet fished with anyone that complements my style. Several people have told me how lucky I am because I catch so many cats. It has nothing to do with luck, but plenty to do with dedication.

    Finding a fishing partner (even here in the midwest where we have abundant fishing opportunities) that complements my style is a difficult thing. I would love fish with someone that automatically knows to sharpen hooks or tie rigs while I'm gathering bait. Someone who understands catfish and is willing to put in the same effort that I do. I don't put a whole lot of thought into fishing with others because it seems in my area, dedicated catters are a rare breed. I still take other people out for catfishing safaris from time to time, mostly a couple of old timers and a few dudes I work with. I find I work double hard because they just don't seem to see how much effort it takes to get into the high percentage fishing.

    So all I can tell you is if you find a good fishing partner in your area, treat him good. Do your homework to figure out the local waters, and learn all you can about catfish life cycles. Tweak your gear and techniques until it is your personal art. Find some honey holes and keep them under your hat. When you start making good catches consistently, it won't feel so lonely.
     
  12. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    Glenn your point of view is a good one and helpful.

    when I use the word 'alone' I'm not so much describing having or lacking a partner. I am describing someone who lacks knowledge and advice on where to start. This board is a useful one, but generalities about reading rivers and bait/technique still leave a lot of uncertainty at the riverside.

    in the fringe of catfish country it can take dedication and knowledge to find catfish. my own explorations have proven to me, that some places are good and some places are nearly a waste of catfishing time in my part of PA. some places just don't hold cats or don't hold cats at certain times of the year.

    I like your answer because this kind of dedicated, scientific (as you call it) and active catfish style will certainly cure the newby of his disease. If you work hard at finding places, and getting the perfect approach; success will come in time.

    Rather the Newby feeling can stretch on and on; if you plop yourself at a bridge with a cooler at some Northeastern river hoping to tussel with a catfish. You may skunk over and over until you find a more likely place and have the right approach.

    I've been fishing locally here for three years, mostly with nightcrawlers. I've rarely caught much catfish. only this year, with a better approach have I had more success with channels.

    I invite catfishers of every stripe to participate. even cooler fishermen have cool stories to share (no pun intended):smile2: Not everyone is willing to quite work so hard for catfish and in many places they don't have to!:cool2:.... but If your skunking a lot and feeling kind of hopeless, glenns advice is spot on- be more serious!!!...
     
  13. Swishersweet

    Swishersweet New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Bourbonnais, Illinois
    Alright, it looks like you are putting in the effort to start eliminating unproductive waters.

    If I was going to give a newbie a homework assignment, it would be this: Learn how rivers function. Basically, all rivers cut through the earth by erosion to attain a lower altitude and ultimately move the water to sea level. In the course of this, no pun intended, rivers attain three basic characteristics, in order: runs, riffles and holes.

    Runs are usually long sections of slower moving water with very little or no change in altitude. Generally runs are not very productive. You may catch some cats that are migrating to another hole in a run, but it will generally be very slow fishing. Runs comprise the majority mileage of most rivers. At the tail of runs, you will find riffles.

    Riffles are where the river is eroding the bedrock and achieving a lower altitude. The water will move through a riffle at a brisker pace (in various degrees) depending on how much of a change in altitude the erosion has cut. The surface will generally be riffled, hence the name. Learn to "read the water" for riffles. The tail end of a riffle is where to look for aggressively feeding cats.

    Holes are created by the hydraulic force of the current. The bedrock is softer here and is scoured out. This is where the majority of the catfish will be found. The best holes will be the deepest holes that contain underwater cover for the cats. The cover can be trees, large rocks, sunken cars, whatever has been deposited in the hole. Holes will often have eddy currents at the head, where the water can be seen flowing back upstream in a circular manner. Eddy currents are generally very productive IF you fish the current break near the head of the eddy. The best approach to fishing a hole is to first fish the area where the riffle dumps into the hole. Active cats will be sitting there waiting to grab anything that washes into the hole. If there happens to be an eddy at this point, fish it! Next fish the upper third of the hole. This is where less aggressive feeders are resting. Finally, fish the center and tail of hole to locate resting cats.

    Now the final home work assignment would be to go learn several miles of your favorite river to find several good holes.

    The best bait for I have found for exploring a section of river is large live minnows. Smash one between two rocks, hook it so the hook point stays exposed, and cast it out on a three way rig so it stays a foot or so off the bottom, tightlined. At the head of the hole, the scent of the recently deceased minnow gets carried downstream through the hole and the cats will come running.

    If you catch some cats, take a few of them home and clean them. Always cut the stomach open and check the contents to see what they are feeding on. Now if you can "match the hatch", as trouters say, you will have a high percentage bait to return with.

    If a newbie follows this advice, they won't be a newbie for long!

    Go get em!