New impeller or water pump repair kit?

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by DoubleD, Oct 2, 2009.

  1. DoubleD

    DoubleD New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    MO
    I have a 1973 25 hp evinrude and a 1978 70 hp evinrude, I haven’t been having any problems with them, but I have had them a couple years and don’t know the last time the impellers were changed out. They were checked by the mechanic last year and he said they seemed to be moving water fine. But I would like to change them out during down time this winter.

    I see that I can buy just the impeller or the water pump repair kit that has the impeller included. Should I just replace the impeller or are there parts in the water pump kit that should also be changed out because I’m not sure how long it’s been since the impeller has changed or if it has ever been changed?

    Thanks in advance for the help!
     
  2. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    take them apart and look at the parts. i only replace the impeller, if all else looks good. i have never had to replace anything else but always check before ordering. impellers are like 10-12 bucks from napa.
     

  3. Todd Strong

    Todd Strong Active Member

    Messages:
    1,023
    State:
    Cambridge, Ne
    Every spring mine gets the complete kit, The kits include the impeller, key, gaskets, seals and the impeller housing liner. I like to know that my motor is getting the water pressure that it needs to reach the top of the heads.
     
  4. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    Yeah, but keep in mind Todd fishes the MO like I do - the sand in that river (I've been known to use the prop as a sandbar plow, too :smile2:) will eat the plates out of the housing pretty quick. Last one I changed looked like I'd taken a grinder to it - paper thin.

    If you're fishing lakes or "clean" water, the plates and housing will probably last a long time. Still ought to change them every couple of years, but to me the impeller is the heart of it. Might not hurt to put the whole kit in now, then you know where you're starting from when you do future maintenance.

    Just my $.02.
     
  5. DoubleD

    DoubleD New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    MO
    I’ll go ahead and put the kit in since I’ll already have it apart and that way I’ll at least know when it was last changed and under what conditions its been used in.

    I truly appreciate everyone’s help on this I haven’t owned a boat in a few years and I never did preventative maintenance before. I usually waited until I had to make repairs, as I get older I see the wisdom in some of the old sayings I used to hear like, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”

    I was also needing to replace the 13 ¼ - 17 prop on the 70 hp, but when ordering it asks whether it has a small or large gear case. Is there any obvious way of seeing what size of gear case it has?
    Thanks again!

     
  6. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Your propeller should have some numbers stamped on it. Use them to order the replacement. Get ready to spend some substantial dough, unless you can find a use one for around 50 to 75 dollars.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2009
  7. trollrap

    trollrap New Member

    Messages:
    73
    State:
    northern illino
    Realy like that last line "...know where your starting from..." Excellent advice.
     
  8. DoubleD

    DoubleD New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    MO
    The only numbers I could find stamped on the current prop were
    13 1/4 -17 and T285.

    Thanks Branden, the lower unit specs really helped out, it turned out to be a large gear case.

    Thanks again, I really appreciate everyones help.
     
  9. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    No problem, glad to help.

    First number is the prop diameter, second number is the blade pitch. Not a clue what the last number is :big_smile: Depends on what kind of water you're going to be on, but a aluminum props will die a lot easier than stainless. Stainless prices will make you pucker, but it's paid for with the second or third AL prop you have to replace. But I'm hard on stuff, too:smile2:
     
  10. etexun

    etexun New Member

    Messages:
    375
    State:
    Texas (Nea
    If you have any doubt about your water pump, change it out. I just finished changing mine. Before I did 2 different guys, one a boat mechanic said it was working fine. It was pumping water. I just didn't think it was pumping enough. So when I broke it down I found 2 of the veins on the rubber impeller were broken off. So be safe and change it out. You don't want to take the chance and burn it up. A kit for my motor cost 80$. The rubber impeller was 29$. The housing for mine was fine so I just changed the impeller. Look in the housing for scratches, grooves, and the walls getting thin.
     
  11. larry d. grady

    larry d. grady Member

    Messages:
    331
    State:
    north caro
    david,keep in mind that a stainless steel prop is not going to break off or bend like aluminum.if you hit something with the stainless your going to warp a drive shaft and mess up a prop possably.
     
  12. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    That'd be true if props were a solid piece, but they're not. The hub is made to spin to prevent damage to the prop shaft in case you hit something with the prop, regardless of the prop material. You can replace a hub a lot cheaper than you can the prop. I'd rather spin a hub on a stainless prop than replace an entire aluminum prop. Again, just my $.02
     
  13. DoubleD

    DoubleD New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    MO
    I don’t live more than a couple miles from the MO just east of KC and plan on putting in there most of the time.

    I had been doing some reading on iboats.com about Alum vs SS props and in one piece of info they talk about “When running your boat in an area where striking the bottom is likely, aluminum blades can flex, helping prevent damage to your engine.”

    But then in another piece of info they talk about “Most propellers are constructed of either aluminum or stainless steel, and utilize a softer hub material to protect your engine's drive train.”

    So it seemed their protected either way by the hub. The alum looks like it would cost about $100 for my 1978 70 hp Evinrude, vs $300 for SS and a hub kit is about $30-40.

    I can see where the SS would be of benefit in the MO with all the debris and dikes there are a lot of things to bump into.

    Do those prices look about right, or can someone recommend someplace either local or mail order that’s more reasonable.

    I use to run some on the smaller rivers years ago, (i.e., Marais des Cynes Osage, Grand, Platte) but haven’t had much experience on the bigger rivers like the MO, so I truly appreciate all the help and recommendations, its great to get help from people who have been there and done it. Thanks!
     
  14. etexun

    etexun New Member

    Messages:
    375
    State:
    Texas (Nea
    I would say your assessment of Aluminum vs stainless was pretty accurate. I am running an Aluminum prop right now on my 55hp Johson. But next summer when my work picks up a little I hope to go to a stainless one. I run mine on rivers about half the time and between sandbars and debris my prop gets a workout. I like to run with my motor down but not locked. That way if I was to hit something submerged it is more likely to lift and ride over it. So far this has been the case. Even being extra careful it will happen.
     
  15. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Don't bank on the hub spinning out of a stainless prop prior to doing any damage to your lower unit. I'm talking from experience:angry:. If you are in waters that it is highly probable that you'll strike something, than go will an aluminum prop.

    One of the main reasons for using a stainless versus an aluminum prop, is that they do not flex, when driven by high torque & horsepower engines.

    An analogy would be, "Do you trust your freeze plugs to pop out so you don't use anti freeze ???

    IMO, if it were a sacrificial key way, I'd trust it more to give way prior to any further damage but not a splined shaft:roll_eyes:
     
  16. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    The problem with aluminum and the Missouri river is that even minor contact with rocks, pilings, etc, smokes an aluminum prop. Stuff that a stainless prop won't notice at low rpm/idle speeds will destroy an aluminum prop - like you, I've conducted that test:smile2:

    As far as bending a prop shaft, if you hit something hard enough that it bends a hardened prop shaft before it spins the rubber hub, it doesn't matter what the prop is made out of:wink:
     
  17. playin4funami

    playin4funami New Member

    Messages:
    4,104
    State:
    Saronville Ne.
    yeah, never run with the motor locked!

    I run ss on my boat with a 85 hp johnson,works great,and I run around alot of rock and wood. I'm pretty careful and when the risk of hitting something gets too great I run the big motor up and drop the troller,it's safer and quieter for that final sneak into position. You could alway get a prop gaurd,but I don't think you need it,just be observant of whats around you and go slow in the rough stuff,most big $$$ damage is done at high speed not idling through the danger zones.