New Hunter Info

Discussion in 'Hunting Gear Talk' started by ColtsFan317, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. ColtsFan317

    ColtsFan317 New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Indpls,IN
    Im trying to get into hunting and now im starting to get my gear. Im in the middle of getting a bow and getting out and practicing all the time but now i need to know about a ground blind or tree stand. Which one do you guys prefer and what ways do you think ill have the best luck with. Ill be mostly hunting deer and my grandpa gets into turkeys every now and then. Thanks for the help
     
  2. Snagged2

    Snagged2 New Member

    Messages:
    6,252
    State:
    Verde Valley AZ
    HI, and Welcome to the USCA/BOC...
    I don't know a thing about where you hunt, but, learning your tackle,archery,,, and having confidence in your ability to judge distance will serve you well.
    The local hunters in your area, or "Pro shops" should be able to get you somewhat informed.
    also, getting out in the area and learning about the deer,etc, would be beneficial, especially to help you "see" them in a hunting setting..Good Binoculars are to me as important as the weapon!!
    Read Everything you can about your gear, prey, styles of hunting, etc, will add to your hunting arsenal.
    Also, there's a lot of folks on the site here, that may be closer to where you are, that have valuable info..and, I'm sure will stop by!!
    Good Luck,G
     

  3. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    howdy and welcome! i spot and stalk when bowhunting, but we are a little short on trees! i shoot a single pin sight and have a practice that might help you in estimating yardage. one of us will put the target out and the other will shoot. no pacing it off or rangefinding. we do this out to 40 yards. it will help you get better at judging distance. a lot of guys shoot from the same fixed ranges standing up and shoot quarter sized groups, then blow it on game. also, if you're planning on using a ground blind, practice shooting from kneeling or sitting in a chair so you can get as close to duplicating actual hunting scenarios as possible. hunting is like fishing, eventually it wil control everything you do! it's worth it though- there's worse stuff to get involved in, like golf.
     
  4. ColtsFan317

    ColtsFan317 New Member

    Messages:
    170
    State:
    Indpls,IN
    lol i was actually hooked on golf for a while very good challenge just got a little pricy. Ive been readin on hunting all winter since i cant fish and im already hooked and never have got the oppurtunity to really hunt. been watching shows and movies on hunting i cant imagine the rush you get, plus i love venison so ill be glad to fill the freezer with some. Already got my camo and every thing i need except the bow which will hopefully be here in a couple weeks. Anyone from the indy area that knows a place where they give lessons on how to shoot id hate to develop bad habits when i first get my bow.
     
  5. hct236

    hct236 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    virginia
    Advice for Just getting in to bow hunting??? practice up on new ways to string cuss words together...lol.. Seriously, in the beginning, trial and error will be your greatest teacher.

    Before you ever head out on a hunt; KNOW YOUR LIMITS!! If you cannot constantly shoot accurately at 40 yards in the back yard, no way you can pull it off in the woods. Also practice ranging distances until you get good at it. Pick a landmark, guess it's distance and pace it off or use a rangefinder and see how close you judged it, and do this until you get good at judging distance.

    If you are going to be hunting from a treestand, practice from elevated positions, your shots will hit higher when shooting at a steep angle than they did shooting flat from the ground.

    For now, concentrate on:

    (1) getting as good as you can shooting your bow, work on proper form and duplicating your form each time you draw until it becomes second nature to you and you always hit your anchor spot with each draw. And your release and follow thru are constant shot to shot.

    (2) judging distances and learning how to adjust for distances that fall between your sight pins.

    After you perfect these two things you can then start concentrating on the hundreds of other things that fall into a successful bow hunt.

    I could go on and on about the in's and out's of bowhunting but others on here will fill you in on the tons of tips and tricks about arrows, sights, broadheads, scent control, ground blind, treestands, etc, etc.

    There have been volumes written on the subject, and I advise you to read all you can and practice every minute you have free. and GOOD LUCK!!!!!