New Forum - Garden Tips And Talk

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by waterwalker, Mar 18, 2006.

  1. waterwalker

    waterwalker New Member

    Messages:
    604
    State:
    Louisville Ohio
    Let me be the first on gardening tips. We have a medium sized vegetable
    garden, it is about 60 X 80 ft. We plant, potatoes, broccoli. cabbage, peppers of all kinds. I reserved one section for horse radish, of which we
    can't get enough of. I also plant Italian garlic in the fall for the next years harvest, we also use elephant garlic which is not actually garlic but is in the leek family. This garden is used for the larger crops that are canned
    or frozen for winter use.

    In addition to the larger garden I have two raised beds that are close
    to my back deck so we can give them more attention. The beds are 8 X16 ft X 12 inches deep. These we refer to as salad beds, in these we
    grow leaf lettuce, green onions, radishes, spinach, actually we use a blend
    of spinach and different lettuce seed along with domesticated dandelion
    that doesn't get flowers and the deep root. I also plant specialty peppers
    like the habanero for my hot sauce.

    The beds contain equal parts of leaf mold, sand, and sphagnum moss. They are also amended with compost and ground leaves. We can also add
    vegetable table scraps and 12 - 12 -12 fertilizer and an occasional lime
    application. The beds produce really nice carrots and parsnips, and the more problematic crops. We can go out and water these without leaving
    the deck. It also very easy to walk down and get fresh vegetables for the
    table.

    We also raise herbs in boxes along our deck close to the barbie so I can
    get to them easily. Chives are a favorite, also garlic chives, in addition
    to most common culinary herbs. We have several large containers we use
    for tomatoes that are at hand when we need them, it is nice to walk out
    25 feet and pick a fresh tomato for the table instead of going down to
    the main garden.

    My wife does the flower thing and I do the other gardens, if it doesn't
    have a flower on it, she isn't interested. Actually we work together to
    plant and harvest, in the fall we can the produce together. She pampers
    her flowers and she makes it very beautiful here.
     
  2. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    This should be a popular thread! Several members are gardners also.

    I grew up raising livestock and fresh vegetables and continue the tradition today. My main crops are chili peppers for our salsa products, primarily the wild native chili pequin and other exotics from around the world mainly from native seed search programs. I grow other vegetables for personal and family consumption as well.

    We grow organically and do not use chemical fertilizers or pesticides. For every chemical product there is a natural option. We also compost our own blends with poultry and rabbit manure.

    I will post garden pics throughout the growing season and hope to see others do the same.
     

  3. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    I know this new forum is going to appeal to me. Just a little tip for gardeners to keep your tools sharp. I take a five gallon bucket half full of sand and pour used motor oil in it, just till it's a little bit standing at the surface of the sand. After I'm finished with my hoe or shovel I just stick it down in the sand and it will stay sharp till next time. I'm sure alot of you gardeners already know this trick, but if it helps one person, I'll be glad that I posted it. Vern
     
  4. RIP

    RIP New Member

    Messages:
    1,298
    State:
    Somerville, Tennessee
    Well be gald, I did'nt know but I do now and will use that one. All I grow is tomatos, in the fall and winter when I clean my eating size catfish I put the skin guts and heads in the garden to brew over these cold months. Makes for really good soil for spring.
     
  5. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    I pratice bio-intensive, sustainable gardening. Strictly organic! "Two things you cant fake, love and home grown tomatoes"! Gardening like fishing, is a lifestyle to me! We have been harvesting green onions for several weeks and should have salad greens in about two weeks!
     
  6. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Cant wait to start growing myself. Theres nothing better than homegrown organic tomatoes. I also plant eggplants, hot peppers-all kinds, brussel sprouts and spinach or some type of greens. May try some different stuff this year, cant wait.
     
  7. Cherokee

    Cherokee New Member

    Messages:
    1,743
    State:
    Salyersville,Ke
    I also was raised on garden food i love talk a thing of salt and going into the garden and grab a big red juicy tomato yummmmmmyyyyyy :love-big:
     
  8. daystarchis

    daystarchis New Member

    Messages:
    11,521
    State:
    Clovis Cali
    Just noticed this section. I have my early spring section going right now. Just started my other part of my garden yesturday. Was gonna wet a line, but looked out my back and told my self I better get it ready for planting:) Here is Fresno, we have a great weather and I always take advantage of it. This looks to be a hot topic, specially in the near future when it warms up back east.
     
  9. RIP

    RIP New Member

    Messages:
    1,298
    State:
    Somerville, Tennessee
    I dont spray my tomatos, I pick the worms off of them. Has anyone ever used them for fish bait? Dont know why but I never thought to try them till now.
     
  10. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Any of you ever heard of stevia? It is an herb that is more then 150 to 400 times sweeter then proccessed sugar and in it's un-proccessed form, i.e. leaves and stems. It is even sweeter when it is dried! It is very easy to grow, Dosent take much room or water, partial shade is good but they say full sun! I got my first stevia plants at home depot a couple years ago, and I know you can find seeds online. It may be usful to diabetics also! I wish I had know about it, while my mother was alive! It can not be sold in stores as a substitute sugar because of lobbying by the sugar industry (my opinion)!
    "While the American public has waited in vain for a safe artificial sweetener to be developed, citizens of certain other countries have for years -- in some cases, for centuries -- enjoyed a safe, natural sweetener that is virtually calorie-free and to which many other health benefits have been attributed. This miracle sweetener is a South American herb called Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni -- commonly known simply as stevia, estimated to be some 150 to 400 times sweeter than sugar."

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration since the mid-1980s has labeled stevia an "unsafe food additive" and gone to extensive lengths to keep it off the U.S. market -- including initiating a search-and-seizure campaign and full-fledged "import alert."

    "To judge from the extensive measures the FDA has employed to keep Americans in the dark about stevia, one might assume it was some type of dangerous narcotic. But, in fact, no ill effects have ever been attributed to it, although it has been used by millions of people around the world, in some locales for hundreds of years."

    ["The incestuous relationship between government and big business thrives in the dark."
    -Jack Anderson /B]
     
  11. Texas_Select

    Texas_Select New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    TX
    Great post Phillip!

    My grandmaother in east texas had stevia growing in a raised bed outside her house and some volunteers that came up in the field garden. There are some organic sites that offer the seed and I might have to start some up!

    I have been waiting for the price of maltitol to drop as the demand grows. Maltitol is a sugar free, reduced calorie sweetener made from corn. It has a 90% sugar taste profile and is used 1:1 ratio to replace sugar. The best news for me is that when used in one of my sugar based bbq rubs, it will not carmelize at any temperature. Imagine a sweet rib rub that has no sugar and will not burn on the pit, just awesome. It is available in white and brown options but very expensive right now.
     
  12. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    Thanks Phillip for the info. How would you use it as a sweetener? Dry it and add a couple teaspoons in cereal? Would it dissolve when added to tea? I'd like to try it this year.
     
  13. RIP

    RIP New Member

    Messages:
    1,298
    State:
    Somerville, Tennessee
    I would like to know also. Have extra room in the garden.
     
  14. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    Cordova, TN
    Hey Rip: Can you use the whole catfish carcass (bones too)? I've heard of using carp, but never cats. And will they work in compost piles too? The new home my wife & I are buying has 2 acres of land (and a little creek running behind it - maybe I can grow some minnas init it for crappie bait? ) that I want to plant lots of flowers & some veggies/herbs. Can use any & all help/advice.
     
  15. RIP

    RIP New Member

    Messages:
    1,298
    State:
    Somerville, Tennessee
    Best fertilizer you can use in my book. You can use parts or the whole fish, when I come back from fishing I put my left over live bait in there too. If their dead. They sell fish oil for plant food, so I just use the fish parts after I clean my fish. The wife hates it when I put it in her indoor plants. LOL. Just kidding there ya'll, she really dont care.
     
  16. catsrking

    catsrking New Member

    Messages:
    777
    State:
    Iowa
    Almost time to get in the early stuff here in Iowa. Sounds like we may get some snow here in the next couple of days. Hope to get in the onions, radishes and lettuce before too long. Ready for winter weather to be done now.
     
  17. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    Paraguay native people, use to just chew it! I have dried it and used it as a powder. There are tons of resources on the internet Here is a good page to read. http://www.growmorebiotech.com/article4.htm
    Cooking with stevia does require a learning curve, but since the advantages of reducing sugar in your diet (as well as eliminating your consumption of aspartame and other artificial sweeteners) are so important, it's well worth the effort.
    The most important thing to remember is not to use too much, which can result in excessive sweetness and an aftertaste. Always start with the exact amount called for in a recipe, or even a little less, then taste before you add any more. Stevia is delicious in almost any recipe using fruit or dairy products, but does present a bit of a challenge when used for baking, since it lacks sugar's abilities to add texture, help soften batter, caramelize, enhance the browning process, and feed the fermentation of yeast. On the other hand, one of the excellent facets of stevia is that high temperatures do not affect its sweetening properties.
    http://www.stevia.net/recipes.htm
     
  18. squirtspop

    squirtspop New Member

    Messages:
    968
    State:
    Glencoe, Arkansas
    I've heard cabbage worms and tobacco worms both make good bait. Probably just about any kind of worm would work. You may be surprised at what kind of fish you'll end up with tho.
     
  19. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    Cordova, TN
    Thanks, Phillip, for the info. I'm definitely looking into it.
     
  20. Netmanjack

    Netmanjack New Member

    Messages:
    3,734
    State:
    Ohio
    Well boys, you have another gardener here. I don't think that I could live if I wasn't growing something during the season. I was borne under a cabbage leaf and never got to far away.lol Garlic is all thats up now. I am going to try leeks for the first time this spring. How early can I get the seed out? :confused: I heard they were cool weather plants.
    I was so happy to meet a woman that canned I married her.lol It's the best times we have together, planting and canning, she lets me plow and weed by myself.lol ;)