Never Done it Before...

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by thegavel, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    Never hunted deer before... my family doesn't hunt, just lost my hunting partner that was going to teach me to a move...

    Back to square one... self teaching...:eek:oooh: this could be scary...

    I plan on using my 870 express to take down a deer this year...

    Where do I start?

    That is where ya'll come in...

    Help me out!!!
     
  2. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Deer hunting is every bit as complicated as catfishing. Would you expect to be able to teach someone about catfishing in one post or thread? Sorry, it doesn't work that way. It's a bit late for this year, but my advice would be to first lean all you can about deer. Then you learn where to find them and finding a location you will be allowed to hunt them. In some cases, it takes years to develope good hunting locations. Then, you can learn about hunting them. Part of that learning process is to learn weapons and what will work and why. After that, you have to practice shooting that weapon. Some folks get good enough after a short practice time, others may take possibly years to get good enough. However, you still shouldn't hunt them until you learn what all is involved after you pull the trigger. Tracking, field dressing, getting it out of the woods, butchering, storing & cooking are all things that must be learned before hand as well as the laws involved in your hunting area.
    In reality, the longest part is the very first, learning deer and everything about them.
    Yes, as with catfishing, there are those who with no training, go out and find success. It happens. So does winning the lottery, but the odds are not in your favor in either case. You do have one thing going for you, you live in Iowa, fine deer hunting location.
    Believe me, having an experienced hunting companion is a very high priority.
    Sorry if it sounds like I'm making it look too complicated to want to go through all the hassle. Deer hunting is an extremely enjoyable experience and I recommend it to all. It just takes time and a lot of learning, just like finding a trophy catfish. There are no shortcuts other than pure luck.
     

  3. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Not much to add to the above post,except ,GOOD LUCK. hope you do very well this year,Chris.
     
  4. whisker maniac

    whisker maniac New Member

    Messages:
    2,712
    State:
    arkansas
    One of the most important things to remember about deer hunting is scent control. Make sure your clean with unscented soaps and your clothes were washed seperate and with a nonscented laundry detergeant. Then also play the wind. Hunt the stands that are down wind of where you think or hope the deer will come in.
     
  5. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    Maybe I should be a little more specific, I have been reading and studying deer for awhile now, I have scentlock gear, and am familiar with the products that are out there for hunting...

    Maybe a better post to put out there would be basic strategies, helpful tips and tricks...

    What to look for...

    I have a couple of public hunting spots that look very promising... a lot of beds, trails, rubs, poo and I have seen deer and where they water...

    I do not have a deer stand, and will probably be hunting from a ground blind unless I get an Iowan who wants to take me under their wing :wink:
     
  6. bnewsom71

    bnewsom71 New Member

    Messages:
    537
    State:
    Mathervill
    If I am hunting public and especially during shotgun season - I will be the first one out and the last one back to the truck. IMO public land particularly during shotgun is just being at the locations you feel that deer will run when spooked. I would go to the deepest, darkest knarliest place you can find that noone in there right mind (except for you of course) would set up in. Put your ground blind up where you can get as many decent shooting lanes across the area and prepare for a long day. I wouldn't leave the blind for anything except to gut a deer. Most people will leave mid to late morning and come back early to mid afternoon- this will be your prime shooting opportunities. To sum up my opinion - Go early, stay late and don't move between sunrise and sunset! Good Luck Man! Kill ya a biggun'!!!!!
     
  7. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Ok, wasn't aware you had already been reading up.
    What the above folks said are all true. Of course, we all lean toward or away from most ideas. Scent has been debated for years, you got to figure it out for yourself. Some folks lean toward extreme measures to be scent free, some folks could care less. Both get deer. I will shower every day if possible and use some scent killer spray a bit. Mostly, I hunt the wind, as they say. Many times I have gone undetected with deer getting within 15 ft of me. Other times, I hear the "snort" from a distance and never see the deer or know which direction he was from me. Most of the time, if the wind is right, I don't need to worry about scent.
    I'm getting too old for climbing trees, so I won't even discus that topic. I have tried numerous ground blinds. All have nice things and faults. Any more, I take a light weight comfortable fold up chair with a high back, and a rolled up 8'X8' camo cloth to drape around me. Set up in the shadows, with plenty of cover to break up your outline. I wouldn't worry too much about shooting lanes. First off, the idea is for you to hide more than to be able to see the deer. Deer have a disgusting habit of not standing where you want them to. If you are hidden well, they eventually will give you a shot. If they can see or sense you, I can assure you they will not step out in the open lanes.
    As was just said, go early-stay late!!! It's a nice thought and works so well because 99% of hunters can't do it, me included. That is one of the reasons I mentioned getting a very comfortable chair. It helps beyond description. Staying out all day is especially important on public land. Also, understand that 90% of hunters on public land, never set up more than a few hundred yards from a road or trail. You need to get further back into the woods and as was said, find the thickest, knarliest, thorniest spot you can find. If you can't hide in there, try to find where the deer enter and set up just off to the side of that spot. Public land can be a great area to hunt, if you do things none of the other hunters are doing. Remember, most of those other hunters are herding the deer towards you, if you are set up right. They may never even know the deer are there. While conducting drives, I have seen deer instantly spook out of a ravine 1/2 mile away from where hunters are entering the opposite end. Of course, I have also had deer wait an jump up not 20 ft away from me. My fault for not seeing them first. LOL
    Be careful what you bring to your stand to eat or drink. Those smells are stronger than your odors. Some, like coffee, will spook them fast. Others, like an apple, will not hurt at all. I don't smoke any more, but when I did, most of the deer I shot was while having a cigarette hanging from my mouth. Personally, I don't think it bothers them one bit. The sight of the rising smoke might, but not the smell.
    Don't worry about if you have to piss. Deer could care less about the smell of human urine. Crap on the other hand has been known to spook deer in some cases. Although, I heard someone tell of a deer walking by that had stepped in the hunters poop and the toilet paper got stuck to the deers hoof. Would have loved to have seen that picture. LOL
    Whatever you shoot, practice, practice, practice. Set up a target the size of a pie pan at the distance you expect to shoot at a deer in your area. If you can hit that target 9 out of 10 times, you are not ready yet!!! You have to be able to hit it every time. Most all hunters have lost a wounded deer at some time or another. It happens. If it doesn't tear you apart, you shouldn't be hunting in my opinion. I know hunters that have wounded a deer and spent the entire rest of the season looking for it. I respect those hunters. I will admit to a crime I committed once. I wounded a deer and never found it through out the season. A month later, I was told where somebody else had spotted it. I went looking and found it. Yes, I did kill it, to put it out of it's misery. I left it for the coyotes. I know it was out of season. I don't care. Had I been caught, I would have paid the penalty with no second thoughts.
    About ten years ago, I realized my memory was slipping and I knew it wasn't going to get better. With the help of my hunting partners, I wrote down an account of every deer I had killed, listing time of day, location, etc., etc.. Since then, I record each deer every season. I am so glad I did that, and highly recommend everyone else to do the same. Over time, those records can help in ways you didn't expect. (this is where I learned about the cigarette thing) All my hunting tactics today, are results of looking at what worked for me in the past. As an example, I buck hunt mainly in the mornings. When doe hunting, I don't even bother getting up till 10 am. 90% of my doe kills were just before dark. All but one buck was killed before 8 am. Although I do see nice bucks mid morning, for some reason I haven't been in a position to kill them or they were not nice enough. For the last 10 years, I hunt a farm that allows only bucks 8 points or more, to be killed.
    Final thought. I didn't have anyone to teach me when I started hunting, over 30 years ago. The first 20 years were training and I only got 10 deer during that time. The last 10 years, I have been selective in what I shoot. Still, my total is now over 50 deer. My best year was 11 does over 2 weeks. My proudest accomplishment, was 5 deer in 6 hours total hunting time. Although not nearly my largest racked buck, my best was a 7 pointer that was teeth aged at 8 1/2 years. Any buck that made it that old, is a great trophy to me.
    I wish you luck. There are few ways to feel more alive than deer hunting. You not only get to learn the deer, you get to learn yourself.
     
  8. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    i hunt only public land now, with rifle, pistol and bow. i do not do the scent lok thing or odorless thing. i do play the wind. i get deer every year, so far. this year i do have some scentless deodorant and body wash and detergent i am going to try, just to see. can't hurt can it? deer hunting, as with fishing or any other hunting, is very infectious and addictive, so be warned. i have been hunting and fishing almost my entire life. i now have a lot of my buddies at work buying guns, bows and fishing gear now instead of golf clubs. i would say you need to get out there as much as possible and hunt your butt off this season. take notes after a trip so you remember everything. you'll see that deer in different locations act differently than how the books tell you they should act, and that is okay. it will eventually give you an advantage over other hunters by patterning deer in a given area. don't lose hope- there will be times you don't see anything but sign for a long time. if you don't kill anything this season, keep at it. you will get em eventually! good luck to you! hope to see you standing over a dead deer when the season gets here!
     
  9. whisker maniac

    whisker maniac New Member

    Messages:
    2,712
    State:
    arkansas
    One tip I can give you is to have binoculars even if you are hunting in a deep wooded area. Binoculars that don't magnify very much will help you focus and look thru the heavy brush to find movement and spot game.

    Sometimes and especially for beginners it is hard to learn to look thru dense forests to find movement or deer slipping thru.

    Another thing is patience. Getting impatient while sitting on stand is the biggest downfall to any hunter. Take a small book with you to read or a hand held game that the sound can be turned off on. Just remember to keep your eyes open to your surroundings also. If you get to distracted by your book or game you could miss seeing a deer.

    Using scents effectively is another good thing to learn. I like to use scent bombs when the rut is on. I usually put them out triangularly around my stand. This not only will attract bucks but will also give me a cover scent.

    There are tons of books and videos out there on the subject and most have valuable information in them. Read and watch until you completely understand what they are talking about.

    If you find a natural funnel in the areas that you are hunting you have found a treasure trove. Funnels are areas that deer will choose to go to be able to stay in cover and not be seen or narrowly seen. An example would be two fields that are seperated at a corner by a tree line. That corner would be a good place because the deer would stay in the tree line as long as they can to stay in cover when traveling. A deep ravine cutting thru a field or in a sparse wooded area would be another good area to look for sign. Deer love to travel down ravines and old creek beds as the banks of it give them good cover from danger.

    Good luck
     
  10. SLIM80

    SLIM80 New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    alabama
    best advice hunt,hunt,and hunt some more u will learn from your mistakes u cant killem sittin at the house
     
  11. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    It sounds like your off to a great start but there are many things that can only be learned in the field. I dont get into too much of the gear aspect of hunting anymore. I shower with dove soap, supposed to be odor free and put my clothes in a bag full of cedar limbs or whatever trees youll be hunting around. I do carry a deer call but Ive noticed it usually works best for the younger deer, and a whistle will stop them in their tracks if they havent seen you. Ive never had any luck rattling . Id set up as many spots to hunt as you can, at least 2-3, even if its just a tree youve raked all the leaves away from to keep from making noise. If you get tired of one place you can stalk to the next. I really like hunting water areas, its where I got the big boy in my avatar. I also like taking a book with me, just dont expect to read much. I only break it out when Im really bored and then only read a sentence at a time and then scan the woods. It can backfire though but it beats giving up.
     
  12. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    Brother, if I had the land I would invite the bridge brothers down here for a deer hunt!

    The first thing I would do is start talking to guys at work who hunt the shotgun seasons and ask if you can go with them. Party hunting is effictive but dangerous IMO. If you find a group that sits and waits tell them you are looking to harvest your first deer and will not pass up a muture doe if the shot presents itself. Most farmers in Iowa will tell you to shoot every dam one of them. You will see way more does then bucks.

    Deer a sneaky critters! A tree rat will make more noise then a mature deer.

    Binoculars? YES! I see more deer in the timber with binos that I would miss seeing with the naked eye. Hunting with out binos is like fishing with out a net. It can be done but it sure helps to have them.

    A good pair of boots and socks. If my feet get cold, I'm done. I have 2 pairs of boots. One for early season and my pac boots for late season. I wear merino (sp?) socks. Good stuff right there. Stay away from cotton socks. They suck!

    Colthing. Remember the rain gear I wore at the gathering? I bought it at scheels for 100 bucks. I bought it oversized because I layer with polar tec fleece and polypro from Cabela's. I hunted for years in cotton and sweat scoks. Got dam cold too. Last year was the first year that I stayed warm and dry and was able to move because my clothing wasn't binding my movement. That system worked great during last years 1st season ice storm. Fleece will wick the sweat away from the body and let it escape. The rain gear lets it pass but will not let the rain in. No idea how it works, it just does.

    Gloves. I use glov-mits. The gloves with the pocket that covers the bare fingers. If you get cold open up a hand heater and put it in the glove pocket. Toasty warm. If you get to warm stuff the hand heater in your jacket pocket and let your fingers cool down in the cool Dec. air. This works great for me.

    I use a knife with a gut hook and buy plastic shoulder length gloves and 1st aid gloves to field dress with. It may sound sissy but I don't like getting my hunting clothes bloddy. I buy a box of each at TSC then put 2 of each in a ziploc bag along with a couple rubber band to hold the shoulder length golves up on my arms.

    I've bought allot of gear over the years. Way to much gear infact. If I had knowen then what I know now I could of saved a ton of money.

    You never know what Iowa's deer seasons will bring. I've hunted deer in everything from snowstorms (that was a hoot!) to sunny and warm wearing a short sleeve shirt.

    If you have any questions feel free to shoot me a PM. I'll be happy to help if I can.

    WARNING...DEAR HUNTING IS A DRUG! a damn good one too!
     
  13. One Legged Josh

    One Legged Josh New Member

    Messages:
    458
    State:
    Ohio
    Peter Fiducia (woods and Water Tv) Has an awesome book called Whitetail strategies .
    It is the most complete whitetail hunting guide I have read. I got my copy at walmart for $8. He came out with "Ultimate guide" last year and it was good also.
    These boys have given ya some good advise! Use it and get in them woods! Best of luck brother..........olj
     
  14. Poppa

    Poppa New Member

    Messages:
    1,233
    State:
    Pinson, Al
    Chris you are receiving great information from some very experienced hunters
    In the first line of your thread you say he was teaching you how to move.
    That statement it makes me wonder if you plan to stalk hunt. In order to
    stalk hunt you need a lot of land that no one else is hunting. Nothing pisses
    a deer hunter off more than to scout an area find deer movement and good
    sign figure out what the deer are doing find a tree put up a stand, when the
    wind is right, you ease in to your stand before daylight and then 45 min. after
    daylight you watch a hunter walk the area out around your stand. Deer hunting today is more scouting, stand placement, and ambush. Now that is
    how we hunt, Where you plan to hunt it might be different stalk hunting
    might be the norm.
     
  15. thegavel

    thegavel New Member

    Messages:
    1,317
    State:
    West Des Moines, Iowa
    Hey brother, I actually lost the person who was going to teach me BECAUSE he moved. I plan on actually using a ground blind for my first deer...! Thanks for the great advice though
     
  16. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Not sure which ground blind you plan on using. You might want to mention it, there are many folks here who could advise both good & bad points of each.

    For instance:
    Chair blind; I have the one man, but the two man would be better as I could barely move my rifle around inside to get it in position to shoot. I kept this one for bad weather days.
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...h-box.jsp.form1&Go.x=0&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

    Strongbuilt; Made more for duck/geese hunting, but works fairly well for deer. Definitely good in a storm. Not able to see as well out the sides or back as I would like and way too heavy at 25 lb's to lug into the woods. I gave it away.
    https://www.strongbuiltinc.com/xcart/StrongBuilt-Hunting-Ground-Blind-pr-16187.html

    Home made blind made 4' X4' out of 3/4 PVC Tubing and the below Real Grass mats that come in 4' sheets. Made a nice blind. I had deer & turkey get with in 10 ft without seeing me. Frame made a nice shooting rest. Grass mat, with fronds standing up as natural tall reeds would, works great, but the tops fell down after several weeks. Turned the mats around with fronds pointing down, lost a lot of the natural look and concealment, Deer spotted me easily.
    Easy to move around each year, but not once season starts. Deer seemed to adapt quite easily to it. It's still in the woods. I may use it again, maybe.
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...h-box.jsp.form1&Go.x=0&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

    Lightning Set; Sets up easy, works quite well. Dang near impossible to store back in the bag. Gave it away, probably should have kept it as it wasn't a bad blind.
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...h-box.jsp.form1&Go.x=0&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

    Stick blinds; Don't bother with any of these, awkward to carry and set up. Lousy concealment. Threw away.
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...h-box.jsp.form1&Go.x=0&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

    Pyramid Type Blinds; Doesn't matter who makes these, they all appear to be the same. Cheap price for cheap stuff. Too small an area inside. Gave away to a guy who used it it once, and he threw it away.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...h-box.jsp.form1&Go.x=0&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1

    I have heard nothing but good about all the Double Bull blinds. Don't know, couldn't afford them.
    Heard a lot of good about Ameristep Blinds, IF you get the big ones. Prices are not bad. I like the looks of the ones that have the Gillie to throw over it.
    Heard a lot of good about Invisiblind, again, high dollar blind.
     
  17. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    Hey Chris. My wife just got her first deer of the season and the first one of her life. To bad she smoked bambi with our van.:0a14:
     
  18. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    "An another ones gone, an another ones gone, an another one bites the dust!"
     
  19. iabowhunter

    iabowhunter New Member

    Messages:
    465
    State:
    South East Iowa
    LOL! Man, bow season can not get here soon enough. I'm ready to thin the population and fill the freezer!
     
  20. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    I hunt up your way myself. Straight north of Kirksville, MO, about 6 miles from Iowa. Nearest Iowa town would be Otumbwa or ever how it spelled. Home town of both Tom Arnold and Radar O'Riley, if I recall.