Need turkey shoot advice.

Discussion in 'Guns - Blackpowder' started by FishMan, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    I would like to try a turkey shoot. I just got a browning 12 ga. silver hunter and would like advice on how to practice.

    How far away should target be and what height?

    what shot size?

    What choke is best?

    and anything else I should know.

    Thanks Guys

    Danny
     
  2. Chris

    Chris New Member

    Messages:
    489
    State:
    Spring Hill, Kansas
    Take a AA MAG lite and drop it down the barrel and tape it. Adjust the beam where the light is focused at its tightest postion, then turn you light on, Make a mark on the wall and practice your mounting your shot gun in your shoulder. The light will show you exactly where you will be when you mount. I will post more about this. This will also work for 20 guage too, you will have to use the AAA battery MAG lite.

    Chris
     

  3. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    Thanks Chris, I have been shooting shotguns for over 40 years I just have never seen a turkey shoot.

    Danny
     
  4. Chris

    Chris New Member

    Messages:
    489
    State:
    Spring Hill, Kansas
    Turkey shots are a blast, you'll meet lots of nice people and lots of shooting advice. Most people use an OPEN choke, since you dont need a real tight pattern.

    chris
     
  5. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    You'll find some folks take their turkey shoots real seriously. They'll have worked over barrels that'll put most of the shot on the target at 25 yds.
     
  6. slabmaster

    slabmaster New Member

    Messages:
    719
    State:
    missouri
    i had a sixteen gauge single shot that won ever turkey shoot it went to. to answer your question most turkey shoots provide all ammunition. this puts the gun to the test. most turkey shoots ive been to has a circle the size of a dime in the middle of a 5in x 7 in papper . the distance you shoot is 40 yds. you pay your buck . get your shell when its your turn to shoot and who ever has the most hits inside the circle wins the round and a turkey.if you want to get good sset up targets at 40 yds and pattern your gun with the loads most used in your area turkey shoots.your gun will have a certain area in your pattern wwhere your shot density is consistantly higher. shoot enough paper to learn where that area is and when you go to a turkey shoot thats the spot you want to hit the little circle with.by the way becareful of the side bets going on there are a lot of sand baggers at shooting contests. they will set you up aand go home with your shotgun if you dont know the game.its easy to mis when you want to. hope this helps.
     
  7. Chris

    Chris New Member

    Messages:
    489
    State:
    Spring Hill, Kansas
    The turkey shoot that i posted about is when we were shooting clay pigeons and whom ever one usually got a turkey. LOL


    Chris
     
  8. smith06

    smith06 New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Ohio
    well that just aint a "turkey" shoot. Thats trap shooting with meat as a prize.

    Most turkey shoots iver been to have a cicle the size of a pop can and they set the target at 30-40 yards and about 4 foot high. Whoever has the most shot in the target wins. For these you want a tight pattern.

    I also go to one that has an "x" and the closest to the center wins. For these it is basically luck. Any ga. gun with any shot pattern can win. You can have a stray shot hit dead on the "x" and win.

    I'd recommend shooting a paper plate with a pop can sized circle with an "x" on it at 35 yrds. And about 4 foot high. I would also recommend using full choke (some will not allow you to use chokes tighter than full). For shells I would practice with Winchester AA in a 7.5 shot. Thats what I normally see when I go to them.

    With a little luck and some practice, you could have a freezer full of meat and a little extra spendin' money.
     
  9. ohiohawghunter45067

    ohiohawghunter45067 New Member

    Messages:
    362
    State:
    Trenton, Ohio
    i use a old stevens 12 guag single shot 31" full choke barrel it barely meets reg. and those shoots are all about how tight a group you can shoot. i also practice with paper plates at 30 yards and i use very cheap shells cause the ones they give you there are all reloads well at least thats what they use around here.,
     
  10. smith06

    smith06 New Member

    Messages:
    76
    State:
    Ohio
    Thats what we got. And old stevens with a ribbed barrel 31". And she is tight. Some of the shoots Ive been to use reloads. But the one I go to the most uses brand new AA's then they reload them for trap.
     
  11. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    are you shooting for closest to the center are most shot either way really you want a pretty tight choke. When I lived in SC the turkey shoots down there said if someone asked to use your gun for a shot you had to let them use it, is that the case for anyone else? Good luck.
     
  12. wigginsdano59

    wigginsdano59 New Member

    Messages:
    91
    State:
    alabama
    you really cannot practice for a turkey shoot lotsa luck
     
  13. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Turkey shoots arent as fun anymore as they once were.
    It used to be that you grabbed grandpas ol rabbit buster out of the closet and put a nice shine on it and went down to the local shoot for a night of fun and hopefully winning a turkey or two.

    Now it has been turned into something else with all the modifications and the barrels that cost 700 dollars.
    It knocks most of us people with more sense then to spend 700 dollars on a shotgun barrel out of the fun and has turned it into serious competition.
    I dont even bother anymore. It was about the fun with me. Seeing the different shotguns that came out of someone else's closet and hearing the stories behind the guns and who it once belonged to.
    Equating one of the guns many use today to a hunting gun would be like trying to say a Cup car was like a factory built car.
     
  14. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Went today at the club where am a member. Every Sunday thru the fall.
    Great fun. But every shoot is different. At ours we have steel target holders made to hold the 5x7 cards of light cardboard. There is a frame the targets slide into, so your shot is at an even smaller dimension. The targets flip when hit. The distance is 25 yards and the firing line is a fence with a top rail you must slide your gun over. Numbered positions for up to 20 shooters. You sign up for 5 or 10 rounds at 2$ per round. The club provides the shells, (Winchester low base #9 shot) and the shooter with a pellet in the dead center X (or closests) wins half the money for the number of sign ups. You win $20 if the line is full, payout at each round. There is a range Capt. and it's surpervised well. "Ties" can elect to split the money or shoot a round just the two. I've seen the judges use calipers it gets so close sometimes. The gauge is 12 and the smallest choke allowed is .670 . Full or turkey chokes over .670 are the guns of choice. The Mossburg turkey units with the ported barrels are taking most of the rounds seems. I use an 870 with a turkey choke .675. They will gauge your barrel with brass bar stock machined .675 to prevent "rolled barrels" which were common back in the day or the newer turkey chokes common since Turkey hunting got so popular. This is one game where smaller is better. (denser patterns=more wins) But the checking makes it fair. And you can shoot grandads old 37 and still win. Most of it is luck.
     
  15. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    I said they check the barrels with bar stock machined to .675 in error.
    It is .670 the maximum choke allowed. Also after reading Marks post I should add that ours is old fashioned. There is food on the grill, cold drinks in the tubs, the minimun age allowed is 12, ( a section of the top rail of the fence is 4 ft. instead of 5 ft. for the kids and ladies of short stature) The first two years I went up there I didn't even own a 12 gauge. There was always a chorus of "go head use mine". And most of the gun clubs open their shoots up to the public so you needn't be a member. And we will have some meat shoots before the season ends. The ones sponsored by private individuals and shooting stores: those are the ones I'd shy from. Those are the ones you'll see the 36" barrels with scopes mounted on them. I don't quit an activity, I find better folks to share it with.
     
  16. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    you need to clean the barrel between each shot. just run a oily rag through the barrel. that little bit of oil helps keep the shot from getting flat spots on it. thats why the mossbergs are doing so good is the way the barrel is made from the factory when compared to other models. most of them will shoot real tight patterns. its just like shooting buckshot. if you got a gun that will hold a tight pattern with buckshot then you are ready for the turkey shoot. if you watch at the shoot there will be one or two guns doing most of the winning. the one we shot in you have to share your gun but not anyone had a oily rag in there pocket.:big_smile: