Need Some Help!!!

Discussion in 'Carp Fishing' started by bamaboy24, Oct 10, 2005.

  1. bamaboy24

    bamaboy24 New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Huntsville,Al
    I have hooked some big carp once every year or so lol. And they were all big and i would like to catch more so any tips on how to catch more of these huge fish would be appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. whiskers

    whiskers New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    colorado
    put a bread ball on a 3/0 worm hook and put a weight above it... HOLD ON BUDDY!!!!
     

  3. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    fish on bottom with dough balls or corn on a slip rig. make sure to cover the hook completly. there are a few things to remember when targeting carp. they (if ya ever seen on eat) eat like a goldfish. they scouer the bottom sucking in mouth fulls of mud where they smell food. if one sucks up your bait and feels a hook it can spit it out before ya even know its there. and the slip rig allows them to take a bit of line and run before feeling the weight. and this is when your setting the hook. ;)
     
  4. bamaboy24

    bamaboy24 New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Huntsville,Al
  5. Sentry Dog Man

    Sentry Dog Man New Member

    Messages:
    438
    State:
    TN
    Although there are a multitude of doughball recipes that many use for carp bait and have great success with them. I find it hard to beat just plain ole, whole kernel, canned corn. It is simple and cheap and does not take up a lot of your time preparing doughballs.

    Maggots are also a good bait for carp, as are wasp larvae, regular worms (red worms) and/or nightcrawlers. But, in my experience, you get plagued with bait stealing sunfish when you use any type of worm/maggot/larvae, especially when you are fishing relatively shallow water.

    Crawdads/crayfish/crawfish are another good bait and you don't have to worry to much about the sunfish/bream, bluegill etc pestering you to death. And, you stand a very good chance of hooking into some cats and/or bass while using crawdads, maybe even more so than carp. I would suggest the small sized crawdads for carp, maybe an inch and a half long.

    The Europeans have carp fishing down to a real science, with specialized rods and add on rod tips (quiver tips etc) and terminal rigging (hair rig, bolt rig etc). So, if you are really interested in doing some "big time" carping. Do a search on carp fishing and read some of the stuff from the Europeans.

    Some people do not want their hook point exposed while carping, due to the sensitivity of the carps mouth and its ability to so rapidly expel the hook, once felt. However, due to the sucking and blowing feeding methods of the carp, I prefer to fish with the hook point exposed because of their method of feeding, since, it seems very likely that upon expelling/blowing out what they have just sucked in, that they will probably blow the hook point (somewhat) into some portion of their mouth. Thus, hooking themselves (to a degree). Please read up on the "hair rig" and you will find out more about it. The bait is placed on a hair (so to speak) behind the hook, the hook is fully exposed.

    I have had success using Range Cubes (this past summer)but you will have to spend some time drilling a hole in them, or cutting a slot (and using a rubber band to hold them on the hook).

    :0a26:
     
  6. bamaboy24

    bamaboy24 New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Huntsville,Al
  7. bamaboy24

    bamaboy24 New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Huntsville,Al
    could you give me a rod and reel suggestiom? Size of hook and what do you think about bite alarms?
     
  8. Sentry Dog Man

    Sentry Dog Man New Member

    Messages:
    438
    State:
    TN
    I would certainly recommend a baitrunner type of reel, Shimano, Okuma, Tica, Penn and a few others offer the baitrunner type of spinning reels. But, you will have to decide what size of line you plan on fishing with most of the time, to determine what size reel you want before you select your rod. Personally, I prefer rods from 7 feet up to 13 ft. depending upon the method of presentation and size of weight I will be using. IMO, a rod of between 7 and 9 feet would be a good starting point.

    As for hook size, it will depend upon the size of bait you are using. For whole kernel corn I usually use from a 4 down to a 10. If I am using Range cubes, I usually use a 5/0 hook. When fishing the Range cubes I use heavy tackle, line, rod etc etc.

    To keep things simple and to just start out you might want to consider a light to medium rod that will handle weights up to maybe 3/8 or 1/2 ounce, with a line range of between say, 6 and 12 pound, with a pretty soft tip but good back bone. The soft tip/to mid section will allow for some accurate casting and will prevent the fish from being able to snap your line so easily when he makes a power run but then you will have some backbone to help pump him in. I lost a good one last night (using 4 lb test line) on a very soft action action rod, it was not that he reached the the stiffest part of the rod and snapped the line but rather, it had to be that I had a nick/abrasion somewhere way on up the line that I had not been able to detect in my inspection of the line. I always inspect (run the line between my fingers, to feel for nicks etc) the line for the first 10 to 20 ft before I start fishing, so I had to have had a weak point way on up the line because I hardly reeled in any slack line at all and he did not run into a snag. But, that is one of the things you have to face/deal with when fishing light to ultralight.

    :0a26:
     
  9. Sentry Dog Man

    Sentry Dog Man New Member

    Messages:
    438
    State:
    TN
    Bamaboy, I forgot to answer your question about bite alarms. I am assuming that you are referring to the electronic bite alarms (but you know what they say about making assumptions) but if I am wrong you can correct me. Anyway, my comments will only be directed toward the electronic alarms.

    First off, let me preface this by saying that I am a firm believer in electronics and know what kinds of great gadgetry there is available. I have an associates degree in electronics engineering and am a Amateur Radio Operator (HAM) and have built some of my own gadgetry (radios etc) for my ham radio hobby.

    Although, I am sure many may like their electronic alarms etc. I have never had the desire or felt the need to have such a device attached to either my rod or my rod holder to tell me when a fish has bitten or is making a run. My eyesight and hearing, in conjunction with my baitclicker or baitrunner reels and my close proximity to my rods has always been sufficent enough, for me. I prefer to be in close and personal contact with the rods I am fishing. So, if I have to go back to my truck to get something (if I am bank fishing) I am not going to leave my line in the water. And, if I was using a bite alarm and was a hundred yards away from my rod, is it really going to do me any good, if it signals me that I have had a strike or run? Can I run and grab the rod immediately to set the hook or prevent the fish from taking my unattended rods into the depths of the deep? No! So, what do I do if I have to go to the truck? I reel in and cast back out when I get back to my rods. I want to be upclose and personal when I fish and will depend upon my audio/visual contact with the rods and baitclicker/baitrunner reels.

    The electronic alarms may have their place with a lot of people. And, that is all well and good. But, for me at least, I want to be up close and personal.

    Also, you must realize that a lot of gadgetry, lures etc etc are meant more to catch fishermen than they are to catch fish. Thus, depleting your funds for what may be more relevant to your fishing experience.
     
  10. bamaboy24

    bamaboy24 New Member

    Messages:
    18
    State:
    Huntsville,Al
    thanks for the tackle suggestions and i agree about the bite alarm the way my grandfather taught me how fish is to hold the rod in my hands the whole time.