Need help sinking brush

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by weathermantrey, Jul 18, 2006.

  1. weathermantrey

    weathermantrey New Member

    Messages:
    516
    State:
    central,sc
    We went out yesterday to my local lake and sank 2 big piles of brush, we tied in a 3 or 4 cedar trees to each pile along with a few logs about 6inches in diameter and 20 feet long. After thinking this over, i'm thinking that there are alot of better options for flathead structure. When we weigh in at a tournament the flatheads we catch will sit under the pontoon with there head directly under the tube, which gave me an idea. I'm thinking of sinking l a piece of plywood with 4 legs attached so that the ply wood sits about a foot off of the bottom, leaving a space for big flatheads to lay under it. What do yall guys think about this, and has anybody ever had any luck sinking some type of structure and then catching flatheads around it??? Also, how long would yall guys say it should take before I could go back to these brush piles and catch fish. We sank the brush in a spot that we did really well at last august, so we are hoping this will just make it even better.
     
  2. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    never tried plywood but we have made pvc trees for other fish I think almost anywhere the fish can hide and ambush food would be good structure though
     

  3. tncatfishing

    tncatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    916
    State:
    clk. tn
    Plywood might not stay together well enough. Might want to try something a little more heavy duty. I would think fish would move in pretty quick, smaller fish would move in for cover and bigger fish would move in for a meal.
     
  4. weathermantrey

    weathermantrey New Member

    Messages:
    516
    State:
    central,sc
    It just seems to me like a flathead would rather have something to lay under more so than something like a christmas tree. I thought about maybe useing aluminum panels or something like that. I think the ulimate would be to make like an 8 by 12 something, maybe like an old deck with treated 2 by 4's or something. Sink that and make sureit sits up right with about a foot of space underneath it. Then go back, and sink a bunch of cedar type brush all around it. That way you have woody structure, but you also have a place for the flatheads to sit and wait.
     
  5. Gone fishin 4 kittys

    Gone fishin 4 kittys New Member

    Messages:
    678
    State:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Make sure you drop it on a hard bottom they like that better. Christmas trees and stuff like that will work better. Because will probally attract bass crappie and bluegill for flatheads to eat!


    Good luck with it


    Josh
     
  6. dcaruthers

    dcaruthers New Member

    Messages:
    756
    State:
    Alabama
    I would think that the flatheads would better adhere to structures that provide some type of protection from the current. Not sure if a flat surface such as plywood would work but you never know.
     
  7. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    Have you tried sinking your brushpiles and trees with your weight tied to rope that will allow the bottom of the pile to suspend? That would seem like the ultimate, you would have a "natural" structure, about 18" off the bottom, best of both worlds?
     
  8. Salmonid

    Salmonid New Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    SW Ohio
    Pallets or skid angled up and wired together are cheap, easy to move and free if you look around for then, adda wireand a big cement clock and the smaller nooks and crannies are great for algae growth, wich attracts nymphs and microinvertebrates, which attracts smaller baitfish and they can hide in the smaller slats and then the trianglelar shape will house bass, and big cats inside, that is what most folks around here do in lakes, works well for crappies too.

    I hear old tires tied together works well also,

    Now on rivers, some heavy duty chainsaws and 1/2" cables is what is needed:wink: :wink:

    Oh yeah, in Ohio on public lakes the state gets testy about private individuals doing it so better to do it and plead ignorance then ask and get denied up front, also be sure to mark with an accurate GPS unit.

    Salmonid
     
  9. weathermantrey

    weathermantrey New Member

    Messages:
    516
    State:
    central,sc
    yea, there's no current on the lake I fish so that not a problem. We tied a 2 liter bottle to one piles to try and suspend it. The spot we sunk it at, the depth goes from the bank, to 29ft deep, then up to 18 feet on a hump, then sharply back down the river channel into 40 feet of water. This all happens over about a 50 yard distance, we sunk the brush right on the top of the hump, when you pass over it with a graph the structure reads al lthe way up to 5ft below the surface. Last year we fished this spot in august and caught 3 20lb flatheads. Hopefully the structure will only make it better this year. I think they like that hump in august b/c the thermocline holds right around 20ft. So that puts the hump in their and the bait fishes comfort zone.
     
  10. knapperheadmatt

    knapperheadmatt New Member

    Messages:
    129
    State:
    texas
    i've seen flatheads while scuba diving that were laying in big brush piles. they seem to get up in the brush then lay on the branches. i've also seen them laying up under old docks that have fallen in.i bet the pallet idea would be ideal.i would get some pallets and remove a few boards from each to allow different ambush points then sink them together and sink brush off each corner. this way you have created a micro environment. good luck,
    matt
     
  11. Baitkiller

    Baitkiller New Member

    Messages:
    1,029
    State:
    Akron, Ohio
    Weathermantrey

    Check your PMs plz :wink: !!
     
  12. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    Another thing that might work is find some of that old plastic lawn furniture that you see all over the place, at garage sales for like $5.00 for the whole set. The tables are usuall like 4' around, you could cut the legs down a little bit, tie the table, chairs, end tables, the whole shootin match together with different lengths of rope, and sink that just off the bottom, or on the bottom. Would give a variety of structure and cover. I see people throwing that stuff away all the time because they have split, or a leg has broken off.

    Next time you are at a buddy's cookout, just reach down and break one of the legs off of the patio table, make it look like an accident of course, or get drunk and fall on the whole set, break it all! Then offer to haul it off for him, free of charge! LOL:cool2:
     
  13. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    beware of them pallets they will float!!!!!! i made some structure out them and floated out to the spot to only see it go down level with the water and still float!!! talk about a job to get that thing back out of the water. i put over 550lbs of concrete block on mine and she still floated. i just used some free pine pallets, maybe oak would sink better but i dont know. also be careful putting them in. i ran a rope threw mine (another one) to make sure i set on the bottom the way i wanted but my dads leg got wraped up in the rope and it almost pulled him in. so be careful doing this. i havent got to fish mine yet because of the thermocline but im looking forward to it.
     
  14. Dragger

    Dragger New Member

    Messages:
    538
    State:
    North Carolina
    I know a guy that had an old steel boat house, he wanted some of us boys to tear it down,so one nite we towed it to a good crappie spot on the lake,after we took almost all the metal from the top and sank it in 30 ft. of water, I took a friend to show him where it was the next weekend and it already had crappie on it . we caught about 60 that evening,and didn't even go to fish......
     
  15. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    dragger have you tried to flathead fish over it? sounds like a good spot.
     
  16. KansasKatter

    KansasKatter New Member

    Messages:
    807
    State:
    Wichita Kansas
    Best way to sink brush, or whatever is in the winter, if you have such a thing where you live. We always drag our Christmas trees, and as many as we can gather around town, out on the ice when it is good and thick. Tie everything up with some concrete blocks, and leave it lay on the ice. When the ice melts, it will sink wherever you leave it.

    Just make sure your ice is thick though......duh!:confused2: