Need Help/Info on Reading Deer Tracks

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by Cat_Catcher29, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. Cat_Catcher29

    Cat_Catcher29 New Member

    Messages:
    48
    State:
    McKinney, Tx
    im new to hunting thing and i got a basic question how can u determine the age of a track can anyone explain it to me iv got alot of tracks around were i set up at but never see any deer so i figure ill follow a set but dont wanna follow one thats like day old and just want to know how i know out of all of them which are the newest but dont know how
     
  2. Chris

    Chris New Member

    Messages:
    489
    State:
    Spring Hill, Kansas
    I sent you a PM about animal tracks

    chris
     

  3. Cat_Catcher29

    Cat_Catcher29 New Member

    Messages:
    48
    State:
    McKinney, Tx
  4. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,299
    State:
    Kentucky
    Name:
    your first name
    Check the ridges of the tracks, if they crumble or look old its old. If you can, set up or check muddy areas. If you can push in the top of a track with minimal ease and stays that way the track should be fresh. If it crumbles its old. Have fun tracking is addictive. :D
     
  5. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    go out and look right after a good rain. any tracks you see will obviously be very new. smoothing out a section of bank around a water hole will do the same thing and also allow you to do a daily check to compare them to newer tracks made in subsequent days. youll know track A was made day before yesterday, track B yesterday, C made today and so on and so forth. will have a real life study guide on tracks and how age affects their appearance.

    an even more controlled example would be to keep a foot off of a deer you kill and use it in your back yard for a similar type test.
     
  6. centralcalcat

    centralcalcat New Member

    Messages:
    1,163
    State:
    Marion, TX
    The detail of a track is often a good way to tell. It just takes time to get good and to view a lot of tracks. look for droppings while tracking animals too. They can tell you alot about patterens.

    -Brian
     
  7. MNwiskers21

    MNwiskers21 New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    South Saint Paul, MN
    Instead of determining how new or old tracks are that you find, just make a track pad. A track pad is simple and easy way to determine deer activity in a certain area. All you have to do is find a deer trail, loosen an area of earth right in the middle of the trail make it about 2 feet by 2 feet and wet it really good. Now leave and check it every few hours and if the track pad is dryed out just wet it again. Do this several days in a row, checking it regularly and if there are tracks get rid of them and then check again later, this will help you determine when the deer are in that area and how often.

    I hope this helps someone for it has sure helped me before.
     
  8. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    the track pad is not a bad suggestion however once you learn how to read sign its not necessary to go to the trouble and the info gathered from what WAS can be as valuable as what IS. good luck
     
  9. Cat_Catcher29

    Cat_Catcher29 New Member

    Messages:
    48
    State:
    McKinney, Tx
    thanks everyone for hlp
     
  10. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    Check out a trail cam. That ought to tell you what types and times of activies are going on as well. That way, you aren't constantly going in and out of an area that you intend to hunt. You can check it every few days or less frequently if you wish. There are several guys here that could give you some info on trail cams if you're interested.

    If you aren't interested in the trail cam, my advice would be similar to that above. Go out after a good rain and see where the sharpest tracks are. Also, when you can, smooth areas where you see sets of tracks and then check back after a day or two.