Need advice on a boat.

Discussion in 'Boating' started by Txbluecatman, May 3, 2009.

  1. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    I have finally gotten to a place in my life where I can afford to buy my first boat. Somethings I want to consider is that I will be using it mostly for fresh water cating. I would prefer to buy it brand new to avoid any unseen problems that may pop up with a used one. It would be me and 1 or 2 buddies out at a time. But I will more then likely take it to the salt water bays atleast 4-5 times a year. I have looked at two different boats and just can't make up my mind. Here is the first one I am looking at....

    http://www.nauticstarboats.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=product.display&Product_ID=79

    I figure for the price it was not bad.

    Now here is the second boat I was looking to buy.....

    http://www.trackerboats.com/boat/?boat=3109

    I like the price on this one as well, but Im not sure it would do well in the salt water as it is smaller then the first. What are the pro's and the con's of each of these boats? Why would you pick one over the other? Any real life experinces with these boats I would like to hear about them. Including maintance costs and performance out on the water. Choices, Choices, Choices.
     
  2. lforet2002

    lforet2002 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,534
    State:
    Tennessee
    Well one thing that I can tell you is that I don't like those big heavy boats..My dad bought a big heavy saltwater rig and it weighed a ton..I like the aluminum boat cause I go fishing by myself all the time and its a lot easier on me and my pickup..
     

  3. centexcop

    centexcop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,078
    State:
    Texas
    I would go with the largest boat you can afford. You'll be thankful for the extra room. A bigger boat will not only be a little more stable, but will handle rougher water better.
     
  4. Txbluecatman

    Txbluecatman Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Texas
    Thanks for the reply. I told the wife I would'nt take it out by myself, for safety reasons. Plus I have a truck that will pull it with no problems. And I am only 15 minutes from my primary fishing hole. Hopefully I wont run into any problems getting there and back.
     
  5. roadkill636

    roadkill636 New Member

    Messages:
    551
    State:
    warrenton misso
    I agree completly!!!!!! coolers and gear take up lots of room real fast!!
     
  6. txriverat

    txriverat New Member

    Messages:
    3
    State:
    TX
    I recently busted the intake assembly (shoe) on my riverboat. someone told me about a tempered plastic shoe instead of using the traditional al. shoe, but I cannot find it on the internet. where would I find one?
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Boat #1 is a big-water boat, designed to handle rough water well, but it may not handle shallow water and stumps well. Boat #2 is designed for sheltered waters; it's not going to handle rough water without lots of pounding, and in high waves, possibly taking water over the front. I've had both types. Take a careful look at the waters you're planning to fish to see how important shallow draft and stump-jumping ability will be to you, then check the drafts on both boats. I definitely like #1 better for saltwater.
     
  8. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I agree, if you are going to be in salt water very often boat #1 many be your best choice. Boat #2 looked like a bass boat more than anything, and that would make me real nervous in rough water. Here on the Ohio river we got caught out in a bad storm last winter on my buddies bass boat while catfishing, and let me tell ya taking waves to the face in December will really get the pucker factor up in a hurry. Catfishing usually takes alot of equipment, and when you add 1 or 2 more people, it gets heavy in a hurry, and you lose space in a hurry. Try and put yourself on the water in your mind, are you going to be using bait tanks? Possibly live wells if you tournament fish. Bigger poles, etc...Everything is bigger when it comes to catfishing. Get yourself something deep and wide and I dont think you will regret it. Good luck:wink:
     
  9. Rohaus

    Rohaus Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,535
    State:
    Vilonia Ar
    Seems to me the guys have given you all the info you need, just pick the one that fits your fishing style and go with your gut feeling either way enjoy your new boat!!
     
  10. kyelkhunter3006

    kyelkhunter3006 New Member

    Messages:
    1,192
    State:
    Ky
    I vote for boat #1 as well. That's an all around every water catfish boat if I've ever seen one. I guess it would work for catching other stuff like bass, crappie, etc. (Why would you want to catch that stuff? lol).

    The #2 Tracker is an entry level bass rig and I wouldn't want to take it on big water or rough water. If you like the Tracker line or want an aluminum big water boat, look at the Targa Deep V's. But for the money, that NauticStar is a nice boat and I'd be proud to have it.
     
  11. slimdaddy

    slimdaddy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,604
    State:
    Nelsonville, Oh
    Name:
    Keith
    go for #1 there no room at all in the tracker
     
  12. catfishcatcher

    catfishcatcher New Member

    Messages:
    493
    State:
    indiana
    I have a 16ft bass tracker that I use for catfishing. The boat was setup as a bass rig but I only fish for cats now. I use this boat mainly in the rivers here but I have taken it out on good size lakes and the ohio river. It is not a good rough water boat but you can fish bigger water with a small boat. I just have to be careful and watch my surroundings close. I would buy a boat that fits your fishing style and more importantly the body of water you will be using it on. If you fish smaller size lakes or rivers that tend to be shallow then I would buy a boat like a flat bottom type. If big lakes and big rivers are you thing then I would buy something more like a deep v that will handle the rougher water.
     
  13. Grimpuppy

    Grimpuppy New Member

    Messages:
    3,556
    State:
    Concordia, KS
    One problem with an aluminum bass boat is the transom. They sit very low in the water in the back and the transom is pretty short. It is not uncommon to take a wave over the back of them in rough water if you get spun around. It gets your attention pretty quick. I do not think I would want to be in the ocean and take a wave over the back of one. I have had them crash over the transom while unloading the boat at the ramp in windy conditions also. You get very wet when that happens. Mine is a 19 footer, and it beats you up in rough water, a 16' would be worse.
     
  14. Steven Armstrong

    Steven Armstrong New Member

    Messages:
    405
    State:
    Sallisaw,Oklahoma
    Don`t buy a small boat ,you`ll be sorry later. beware of tracker, they won`t stand behind their product and takes a act of congress to get any action, ask big sam over at booneville ark. on alum. check out sea ark, war eagle and f and f custom. on glass boats you might check out blue wave. if you`re going for a new boat get what fits all your needs or you`ll just be trading again later.
     
  15. Dunnica

    Dunnica New Member

    Messages:
    10
    State:
    Texas
    Go to www.seaarkboats.com & check out the V-pro and V-cat series boats....You can get a fully welded (Well put together) aluminum boat with a 15 degree hull....it will take a pretty good wave and they can come with a pretty good bit of storage with the right model..:smile2: