Need Achoring Help?

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by crazychuy, May 13, 2006.

  1. crazychuy

    crazychuy New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    Southern California
    Hey Brothers,

    I go fishing at this private lake in California alot and the rental boats have cement blocks as anchors. When ever I anchor my boat down, no matter what kind of structure I'm on I still seem to drift.

    What am I doing wrong. I just want to anchor down and not drift. I see some of the other boaters with private boats anchor down and they stay anchored like a rock. What do I need to do to anchor still?

    CHUY
     
  2. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Ya may need to get what the other boats are more than likely usein. AN ANCHOR! LOL! A cinder block may hold in a tub, but it ain't gonna work on a lake. LOL!
     

  3. trfoster

    trfoster New Member

    Messages:
    117
    State:
    north carolina
    So true,well if you dont want to invest in a good anchor than if you have a couple of those old cement wieghts the ones they used for wieght lifting,they have the holes threw the middle.take a couple of them along and some extra rope or twine and tie some extra wieght on.20lbs might do it.dont think the cyinder block alone is going to hold down the boat pluse your wait.thats why you are drifting.but if you want to invest in a anchor than i use a snag anchor ,youll drift a little until it snags on something,rocks,logs,roots etc.to get it free you just go the oppisite direction that you were drifting and it unloges itself.:smile2:
     
  4. Dnedster

    Dnedster New Member

    Messages:
    122
    State:
    Wisconsin
    #1 a good anchor and long lines we anchor on sand bottom in the river with heavy current the longer your line the better holding power .
     
  5. bmaultbay

    bmaultbay New Member

    Messages:
    498
    State:
    Clarksville, Tennessee
    I believe I read in another post that for evey foot of depth. multipy by 3 for proper anchor rope length. in other words, 8 feet of water, 24 feet of rope. But I do believe it is tied to an anchor, not a cinderblock. Honestly do not see why that would not work though, as long as it had enough weight.
     
  6. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,160
    State:
    NC
    Dropping the anchor straight down just wont work. You need the scope to be at least 5:1 for calm weather. That means if the water 5 feet deep, then you need 25 feet or rope.
     
  7. photocat

    photocat New Member

    Messages:
    803
    State:
    HOCO, Maryland
    how deep are you anchoring in? and how long is the anchor rope? whats the bottome structure like as well?

    If your using 30 ft of rope in 40 feet of water or even in 25 feet of water its not going to be effective... A cinder block (im thinking the ones that are 20+ lbs should work if there is any bottom structure at all and the rope is long enough which it rarely is for rental boats.

    If i were you i'd go buy 100 ft of anchor rope (cheap one is 9.99 @ bass pro) and a cheap anchor and use that when you want to anchor up...
     
  8. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    I may be reading your post wrong, but are you meaning that the boat drifts across the lake or that the boat drifts back and forth? If you mean back and forth, it is because to hold tight still, you need at least two anchors. One up front, with 3 times rope length as said above, and one in the back or off to the side, depending on current or wind. The back one doesn't have to have as long a rope as the front one. This setup will keep the boat fairly still, but not much chance of no movement at all.
     
  9. duxsrus

    duxsrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,014
    State:
    SW Ohio
    It amazes me that several people have just said that they can't get their boat to anchor with a cinder block. Are you talking an 8X8X16 block? Those weigh a minimum of 40#'s. I have 5 anchors for the boat, a Chene, a Minn Kota Crab Claw, a Richter, a mushroom and a cinder block. The cinder block will hold as well as any of the store bought ones. There just a bear to pull out of the water. I take the cinder block when ever I'm heading to unknown waters and don't want to take a chance loosing one of my good ones.
     
  10. Majesticman

    Majesticman New Member

    Messages:
    186
    State:
    Missouri
    Add a 5 foot chain between the rope and anchor. That will help a lot.
     
  11. crazychuy

    crazychuy New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    Southern California
    Hey Guys,

    These are concrete blocks that are poured into a coffee can and then the can is cut from the concrete. You can tell because each block has rings and contours to the shape of a coffee can. I don't think they're even 25 pounds. One of the other guys that is a BOC brother that fishes the same lakes as I do tells me to bring extra rope because the rope is never long enough.

    Some of the depth that we fish in the lake is an average of 4-45 feet. At times I would have liked to anchor on a 65' shelf but the boat would drift so I would have to anchor in shallow and cast a country mile to the marker buoy where I meter structure and fish the area that way. This is great but there has got to be an easier way to fish the structure.

    Thanks for your expertise and help.

    CHUY
     
  12. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    Chuy, I mostly fish rivers and anchoring in current comes naturally for me. I am like you when it comes to lakes. It seems the wind is always moving you around in circles. I have a private lake that I fish for panfish sometimes and there is a small area of standing timber near the dam in 40 feet of water. I have marked it numerous times, but have never been able to anchor where I could sit straight above it. I have used two anchors, one anchor, anchored as straight down as my boat would hold, but I cant never sit directly above it for an extended period of time. Good luck. Vern
     
  13. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    Well I Can Get My Boat To Stay In One Place Now:tounge_out: , But I Still Can't Get It Over A "Spot" I Found While In Current Or Heavy Wind.

    Patience Certainly Isn't A Virtue Of Mine And Even More Frustrating Is When I Finally Do, If At All, I think That Throwing The Anchor More Times Than I Care To Count Has Scared All The Fish Off:angry: Elliot
     
  14. crazychuy

    crazychuy New Member

    Messages:
    92
    State:
    Southern California
    Patience is not my greatest virture either. That's why many of my friends and family don't understand why I am such an avid fisherman.

    CHUY
     
  15. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    My wife just weighed a standard cinder block for me.Ours weigh 28 pounds dry.They make a fair to good anchor IF you tie to them around the middle in the right way,they tend to hold a lot more.If you tie them by the end,they are easily drug.They are cheap.Buy one and try it out in the yard.You can see how well it holds at the different rope angles,and the different ways that you can tie on to it.Caution!! It will weigh a lot more when waterlogged!Luck! peewee-williams.
     
  16. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    Anchor weight has little to do with anchoring. It's the holding power that is important. I make anchors by welding flat bar to a pipe, adding a chain, and rope. The anchor probably doesn't weigh ten pounds. It'll hold in as much current as I care to fish in. The flat bar grabs better than rebar, which is what I used to make anchors with. When anchoring on a soft bottom, you may need a little more rope to make it hold. On a rocky bottom, you can anchor nearly straight down. I've seen it and done it. I frequently anchor in 30'+ water and have never used all 100 feet of my rope.

    I probably wouldn't move very often if I had to retrieve a 28 pound anchor every time.

    I made two anchors today. I haven't added the chain yet but they are close to river ready!
     

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  17. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    I have found places where WEIGHT has everything to do with anchoring.It would be nice if all of the places that I have anchored in would hold with one type of anchor.Slick rock bottom and soft shifting sand will laugh at anything but weight and scope.Anchors like the above are often used to fish the sounds and snag the artificial reefs along the Georgia coast.These type anchors,short ropes and boats have been found drifting along the Florida coast,weeks after disappearing off of Georgia.These people BELIEVED in their anchor.They died.Reading of this,and talking to the Coast Guard led me to go to the extreme when it came to anchoring.If my 2 motors failed,my life depended on my anchor and lines.The above anchors are a great anchor for the right boat,the right place and the right conditions.I used and believed in this type for much of the fishing that I have done.The wrong anchor and rope can and often does lead to death.I can no longer handle the anchors that I used.peewee-williams