Navasota River

Discussion in 'TEXAS RIVERS TALK' started by texasaggie23, Dec 14, 2009.

  1. texasaggie23

    texasaggie23 New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Texas
    Went fishing on the navasota river about a month back when it was pretty low and set out about 20 throw lines. We fished the lines for two days and did ok. Now i know there are a lot of gar in the navasota, but we checked the lines pretty religiously and the first night had 14 straightened hooks (good hooks 10/0 mustad live bait) and a broken line (with a rubber on it). we figured it was gar problems so we got bigger hooks and set out again the next night with a heavy "super" line in the spot of the broken one. Next day, broken again,and about 12 more straight hooks, so we pulled our lines out.

    We fished again in the same areas when the river was up and caught 3 30+ pound fish, 4 in the 20+ range and 10 or so around 8-15. the biggest was 38. Now i'm at a loss as to what all those lost fish were on the previous trip. Thoughts?
     
  2. thecatman

    thecatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,763
    State:
    Graham, Texas,
    possibly loggerhead turtles or large gar or very large cats you may want to switch to gama big river hooks or eagle claw king kahle hooks
     

  3. texasaggie23

    texasaggie23 New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Texas
    I thought turtles too, but they were snapped from sheer force; all the line had flown up onto the bank, and i'm positive that we were the only boat in the area. The straight hooks were probably mostly turtles and gar, but we never really saw any turtles, and never caught any gar the whole trip. Some of them happened in a matter of an hour or less with big baits like 8-12 inch mud cats and big perch. I had some big rivers out with big bait, but they didn't catch, i think there probably wasn't enough current for them to work right though. Thanks for the input, maybe i have a monster hiding from me in that river... wishful thinking haha (btw, i caught my pb 56 on the same style rig, so whatever it was, it was definitely big)

    Sometimes these things just confuse the heck out of me
     
  4. thecatman

    thecatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,763
    State:
    Graham, Texas,
    it could be bad spots in the line as well as very large fish i have had 1 line snapped like that before and i placed it at a huge flathead hole and using that large of bait if you place it right in the huge hole of a massive flat that is very possible the case that you have just found a massive flat hole beavers and coons may be another culprit as well
     
  5. texasaggie23

    texasaggie23 New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Texas
    Well the lines were new, so i'm going to assume it was a large fish. A beaver could be a possibility too, but the limb we had the line tied to had a ring dug into it from the line, and being that a beaver would have just chewed through it probably wouldn't have pulled that hard to make the line rub like that. I guess i'll have to go try with rod n'reel next time, but its gonna be a little too cold for a while. I guess the wait will just make it that much better.
     
  6. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    How about using trotline-type twine for some of those limb lines. Then, I would put on a couple of treble hooks, or, use a couple of of large hooks with durable, yet lightweight, cotton ropes attached to the hooks. Cutting the ropes into short pieces and ratting them up could help tangle up gar teeth. I have used panty hose myself for the cathooks. Seems to work okay.

    Although I haven't used ratty rope myself, I have heard that others use this method. I also know that many folks, including myself, dislike trebles. But for experimental purposes these may help to snare your bandit(s).

    Sounds to me like a few big bad water critters. Not just one. I can't believe that one fish, no matter how big he is, will put up with his mouth be torn up like that just for some fish.
     
  7. thecatman

    thecatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,763
    State:
    Graham, Texas,
    since this is happening mainly on limblines it could be alligators i know for a fact that they are in the trinity up around the corsicanna area so i dont see a reason why they wouldnt be in your area as well be rather tough gettin one of them in the boat as well lol
     
  8. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    Brandon has a really good point. Gators have been found on the Brazos all the way up to College Station.

    The College Station crossing is about 22 crow miles NW of the Brazos/Navasota confluence. I see no reason why gators could not be the culprit in your river. Even turtles will give up on bait soon if they can not remove it from the hook.
     
  9. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    It couldbe gators or something else wierd. But I will tell you one thing, I have seen 90lb+ flatheads pulled out of that small river with regularity. I see pics of probably 8 to 10 a year that break 90lbs and dozens of pics with 60lb plus flatheads. I know I have caught blues in that river and Lake Limestone that are over 60lbs. There are big fish there, so that might be what is happening. What type of line are you using? What type of rubber? Are you tying your limbline to a green limb or to a solid one?
     
  10. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    James has also brought about a really good point which is unrelated to the post......if I may. Seeing that many trophy cats come from one river? Threatened trophy cat population? How does it mix in light of numbers like those? I would love to catch a 90er and I can assure he would be table fare. A fish that large would allow me to spare the smaller ones for quite some time until he was eaten.

    Rant complete. ;)
     
  11. cathog

    cathog New Member

    Messages:
    855
    State:
    Lone Oak Texas
    Michael, I am not a die hard CPR guy, everyone has the right to do what they want with a fish they catch. I personally eat the little ones and throw the big ones back. Reason being is, the big ones are the breeders. I do not want to take the genetics away from a fishery that make big fish. I know that the little fish have these same genetics and can get big, but they are not the ones propagating at this moment. Just my opinion for what its worth.
     
  12. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    My reasons for releasing the bigger ones are simple. They have PROVEN that they have the genetics, aggression, and survival instincts that let them grow to massive sizes.

    The smaller cats may or may not have these traits.

    This river has limited access in a lot of areas that people are catching these fish. You either have to know a land owner or shoot WAY up river with a small boat with a buddy willing to get out and wade in the muddy flats that will stop even the smallest flatbottoms.
     
  13. Blind In Texas

    Blind In Texas New Member

    Messages:
    143
    State:
    Houston, T-E-X-A-S
    Good point, Gary. I suppose NOT eating fish that large is one way to assure that the gene pool of successful fish continues to fill our waters. I believe I understand.

    It is interesting to note that over this past weekend, my son netted a 7.5#/20" drum. After gutting it for cut bait it we noticed the large quantity of eggs. There must have been at least two cups of eggs in that fish. I never saw that many eggs in a ten or twenty pound catfish. Just helps give me perspective. The drum contained twice as many eggs.

    I do believe I have changed my mind about keeping extra fish. I can understand the impact of removing proven genetics.