My new fur shed.

Discussion in 'Trapping & Fur Taking' started by cuttingout69, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    Back in 1990 I built a shooting room on my place in Cotton Valley. I had all my reloading equipment in it and a 250 yard range out he window. I could shoot, reload the case I just shot, and shoot it again. I could tell you just how many time you could reloading a Remington case before it spilt, and how long till you had to trim it. I shot thousands of rounds down the range. After I got married in 1997, I moved it to my new home in Sarepta in town. I had 19pine trees for shad and I put the building right under three for good shade. I sure missed not having my shooting range right out the window.

    Well a few years back during and ice storm I had a huge pine limb fall through the roof and made a mess in side. I just let the building go, and moved my reloading equipment to a new spot in my shop.

    After working this past season for my fur buyer in the his fur shed, I am ready to start drying my own fur. So I am in the process of converting the old reloading building into a fur shed. With the help of gooboy (Eric) I have done a lot to the building. I have put a new heavy gauge McRoy metal roof on, I leveled the building and added a lean too for skinning fur and fish. I have buried the electric and water to the building and totally rewired the electrical system. I have put up a new skinning pole, and Eric and I have been covering the walls, ceiling and floor with plywood. I plan to put he fleshing beams in soon, and add a beaver skinning table. I have a lot of work yet to do on it, but I will have it ready for trapping season. I have also been making boards for drying the fur. I can't wait to have it done and start putting up fur. I will post so more pic soon. As you can see from the pic, I have ripped the inside out and the trash is every where. I hope to finish the project by mid July. I can't wait to show yall my beaver skinning table and the way I am going to set up the fleshing beams. What yall think about my skinning pole? I have already skinned fish on it, and can't wait to put a deer up to see how it works. I think it is a telephonemans dream pole. LOL
     

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  2. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    Looks like it'll make you a nice furshed Michael! You may end-up adding a gusset under the arm on your skinning pole, to support the arm.....and you can add a winch (either from a boat trailer, or electric) to it to help peel them furs :wink:

    I'd read a post somewhere where someone had made about a table for putting-up beaver. The top spun, so he didn't have to walk around the table to nail the pelt, he just spun the tabletop. Sounded like a neat idea.

    You can also hinge your fleshing beam(s) to the wall, with a hinged leg to support them while in use. When not in use, fold them up against the wall & have alittle extra room.

    You guys are doing a great job, be sure & keep us updated on your progress.

    Smitty
     

  3. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    The picture is not real clear I guess, but the pole has a top brace made of guy wire. I do not like the bottom brace type poles. I want that area clear of obstructions. I have a boat winch on the pole already also, and I plan to put another one on for bottom pull. I want to be able to put an otter at the right height, and then use the bottom pull wench to remove the hide.

    Also on the fleshing beam, I do not like the wall mounted one. I like to pull down on my fur. I plan to bury a 6’ section of telephone pole in the ground and the mount the fleshing beam on top of this at a slight angle. I will just have to take a pic and show you what I am talking about.

    On the beaver table, I plan to have it set on a slight angle toward me. I will add a catch trough for the blood, and I am going to put a tail catch bar on the back of the table. Lift the bar and slide the tail under it, then let the bar down to hold the beaver in place while I remove the hide. This will be used only after the beaver is spilt and the hide is removed above the legs.

    One thing I have learned over the years, it work smarter not harder. It make take me three tries to get the results I want, but when I get it, it works for me.
     
  4. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    Looks like a nice job, Heck I could live in there. LOL
     
  5. catsmith1

    catsmith1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    State:
    Haughton, Louisiana
    Looking good Tony! I love the skining pole. Where do you get your utility poles?
     
  6. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    ah, ah, work!

    I removed from a job the other day. We had abandon it in place the home owner asked if we could remove it. So I did. Did not have any place to put it, so I brought it home and made a skinning pole out of it. It is in good shape to be a 1969 mod. That is birth mark on it. Last inspected in early 1070's. It is in good shape too. It dose not appear to have been hooked over 20 times.

    Thanks, I am glad you like it.
     
  7. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    I saw the upper cable, but thought it was just 1 cable that ran thru the extension arm. Have you looked into the Blue-English fleshing system? Sounds like it right up your alley. I haven't tried one, but heard alot of guys like it.

    Smitty
     
  8. sds888

    sds888 New Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Townville, South Carolina
    Just wanted to say thats a great looking shed wish I could find me one or find the money to build one.
    Stephen
     
  9. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    I have not heard of it. What is it, and how does it work?
     
  10. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    I haven't used one, it's a complete fleshing system, beam, knives, not sure what all else is included. The beam stands basically vertical & you flesh in a downward motion. I did a quick browser search, but didn't come-up with any info (or pics)....

    Smitty
     
  11. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    What I am going to use is just and old draw knife, modified for fleshing. I will make my own fleshing beam out a 2x6 pine grade A cut to my spec. I will show you what I am talking about on my when I get it finished. I guess I could finish it, if I would stay off the river.
     
  12. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    I use a Necker 600 & bought a Sheffield last year (but haven't had a chance to use it yet). I made my beam out of a 2"X6" like you mentioned, and it's worked well the past few seasons. I'm wanting to try one out of a large peice of heavy-wall 10" PVC I got for that purpose.

    Be sure & post pics when you get it done. Once I get my skinning area set back-up this fall, I'll do the same (I pack mine up for the summer).

    Smitty
     
  13. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    I am using a old wood draw knife. That is what I was shown to use, and the work well on coon, cat, fox, and mink. My traping partner has a 600 like you, but it has not been used yet. We will try it out later this summer when I get the fur shed finished. I will post some pics of the set up when I get it. I am calling this a fur shed, but it will be used to dress deer, fish, and fur year round. I had my 78 year old teacher come over today to pick up some spotted cat and while he was there, he checked it out. First thing he asked is where the fans were going to be? He said you have got to have lots of air moving in a fur shed. I told him how and where I was going to hang them and he asked if I was going to put heat on them. I may mess up some fur, but it will be my fur. I promise it want take long to figure it out if they spoil.
     
  14. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    I think you'll both like the 600, it's a nice knife. The sharp side makes is easy to shave the grissle off around the shoulder areas, and the dull side will push-off the easier fat with little chance of damaging the pelt.

    Air circulation is a good suggestion, and 1 medium-sized box fan would do the trick. It will help with the hummidity. Heat is something that will speed-up the process, but isn't a requirement. If you do add some heat, just be sure not to hang any fur too close to the heat source.

    lol, a furshed can have varried uses......mine's done everything from poker games to NASCAR races......oh, and putting-up fur too :big_smile:

    Smitty
     
  15. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    I wanted to mention a couple other things about spoilage. As soon as a catch has been dispatched, the clock begins ticking. There are a few things you can do to keep the clock from ticking any faster than it has to.

    Don't stack your catches in a "pile" as they wil insulate each other & retain body heat. You want them to cool as quickly as possible, so lay them out individually.

    Along with the above paragraph, lay them away from any heat-source (like on the warm floorboard of a vehicle). With wet catches, in freezing weather, care needs to be taken also as to where they are laid.....wet fur on a cold metal truckbed is like the kid who stuck his tongue on the frozen flagpole. If this happens, pour water over it to unstick it to keep from ripping-out the fur.

    Spoilage (bacteria) usually begins in the belly, so lay them belly-up. Not sure if you've hever heard (or seen) of "green-belly", but that is where the term comes-from. That's why alot of buyers are hesitant in buying whole animals, even if they were frozen. Green-belly will appear on the skin-side of the stomach.

    Same goes for freezing pelts, freeze them flat (or folded once in the middle), 1 at a time. Fur is an excelent insulator, roll them into a ball, or put a pile in the freezer at once & it'll take alot longer for the center to freeze than the outside, increasing the chance of spoilage & slippage.

    Smitty
     
  16. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    Well, we do not have freezing problems down here. You said you lay the bellies up, I lay mine down on the floor to cool them down. If I lay them up, the sunshine will heat them faster. I have seen a pile of green bellies at the fur buyers shed this past season. I have never had one in my fur in my life.

    I start my fur handling from the time the animal is dispatched till I sale the fur. I have always sold my fur green due to time and knowledge of the process. My fur buyer has always complimented my fur and paid more for it, due to it being clean, dry, and with very little fat/meat left on the pelt. It take no time to scrape my fur after I clean it. In fact Gooboy and me carried our first load to the buyer one evening and he had two scraper in the shed waiting on our fur. He put it on stretchers as soon as he bought it. Took them less than 1 hour to put up 62 coons. The scrapers told us that was the best fur they had seen all week. I believe in selling quality fur for a quality price. I learned one way, and Gooboy taught me another way to leave the meat and fat on the carcass. My way works the same, it just takes longer than his. I have the old timer to count on to help out with fur problems this season. He has already told me a lot, but there is nothing like doing it yourself.
     
  17. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    Sounds like you two have got it down! The green-belly does take alittle time, but can be a matter of hours. I start running my traps around 4:30-5:00AM & may be out as long as 12 hours before I'm back here to start skinning. I usually skin coon first, then they go in the fridge or freezer (depending on the amount I have yet to skin) so the fat will "stiffen-up" enough to gel it from being liquid.

    Coyote are easier to skin warm, but rarely do I get the chance to do that. I have had 1 that started to spoil in the belly, but it was a long (and good) day. Ask your furbuyer about laying them belly-up & get his opinion. If you think about it, belly down allows all the blood & internal fluids to pool in the belly.

    Smitty
     
  18. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    We are lucky if we have upper 40's for day time highs here in Jan and Feb. Most of the time, it is in 50's. We just have not been having winters the past few years. We are in warm part of the circle I guess. Any way I lay them belly down on the concert in the garage where the sun never warms it. It stays cold longer thus it cools the bellies down. I also try to keep the carcass in out of the sun but in the open air. I do not cover a lot of miles compared to a long liner. I gang set and area, and move on when the catch falls off. I do not sit till I am catching nothing unless the land owner is paying for it. I may drive 30-40 miles to get to the start of the line, but then I will only cover 10 miles. I may make some stops along the way, but I do not run a road line any more due to land leasing and the trespass laws here in La. A long day for me puts me back at the house by 5pm. Understand all of this is the way I do it on vacation. When I am working, I will run traps close to the house before day light until 7ish. What I will do this year, is take a large ice chest fill it with water, and one block of ice. Any thing I catch will sit in the water all day till I get home that night. I will then clean it cold, but not frozen. If I am going to be all day moving traps on a vacation line, I will find some shaded water deep enough to cover the animals and I will wire them together and sink them till I am through. I works really well, you just have wet fur to deal with. I would rather deal with wet fur than spoil fur though. No matter how hot it gets, even into the 60’s the water will stay at about 40-50 and no flies or buzzards can or will get to the animal.

    The worst animal I have found to get a green belly is a fox and cat. They tend to turn green faster than any thing. I base this on the amount of green belly cat and fox I processed at the fur buyers place this past season. I know for a fact that if you freeze a cat, his belly will turn before he is thawed enough to skin most of the time.

    I only lack one wall having the inside walls up in the fur shed. I hope to finish them this week. I have got to go put a new axle under my boat trailer tomorrow. I ran a hub off over the week end, and messed the spindle up. I have always used hub buddies, but I think they let me down on this axle. To get grease to the back bearing with a hub buddy, you have to pump enough grease through the front bearing. I don’t think I was pumping enough grease in to the hubs. I think the back bearing over heated due to no grease, and then caused the front one to go out. Then new axle I am getting has a grease fitting in the axle that puts the grease between the bearings. I think this one will work better.
     
  19. 223Smitty

    223Smitty New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    Indiana
    I just had to replace an axle myself (badly bent spindle), got one at Tractor Supply, complete with 5 bolt hubs & ready to bolt-in (other than I had to relocate the springhangers to fit the trailer) for $120.....if you have these stores where you live, might check them out.

    Smitty
     
  20. cuttingout69

    cuttingout69 New Member

    Messages:
    1,349
    State:
    Louisiana
    I had one built at tiger axle. This one has greasible spindles. The grease fitting is in the end of the spindle. Just the axle is $130.00. It is a 2000lbs axle with hubs. I also had to replace a tire. I ruined a tire when the hub went out. What a mess, Sgt.Rob has picked it all up for me and we will install it this evening.