My new bluegill live bag

Discussion in 'Catfishing Library' started by tbartek, Jun 27, 2008.

  1. tbartek

    tbartek New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    742
    State:
    New Germany, PA
    I made a new live bag for keeping my gills in. It's about 12" in diameter and around 12" deep. I usually take 8 or 10 gills with me when fishing all night and the bag is just the right size. I've included instructions and pictures in case anyone wants to make their own.

    Materials needed for Tim's bluegill bag:

    The first and most important thing is a wife that sews

    1 - Yard of aquatic mesh fabric
    3 - 36" long 1/8" aluminum welding rods
    1 - 36" length of 1" clear vinyl tubing
    1 - 1/2" plastic threaded pipe nipple 2" long
    3 - 10 gage electrical crimp-on butt connectors
    15' of parachute cord
    1 - pushbutton cord stop
    8 - 1 oz. egg slip sinkers

    [​IMG]

    All materials except the fabric can be found at a good hardware store or in your tackle box. I got my fabric from a place called Collins Cottage. Their web site is http://www.collinscottage.com The fabric was only $4.95 a yard. I have less than $10.00 in the whole thing.

    Click here to down load the pattern for sewing the bag.

    First I drew a pattern for my wife to sew the bag. I've included a copy of the pattern for anyone who wants to make their own. Next, I used my minnow bucket as a form to bend the aluminum rods into a circle. Then, thread the rods one at a time through the three small hemmed pockets. These are joined end to end with the crimp connectors. I used a 5/32" drill bit to open the holes up in the sinkers so the rod would slide through easily. When I threaded the rod in the bottom hem, I popped the rod out of the hem at regular intervals to run the rod through the slip sinkers to weigh the bottom of the bag down. When the bottom hoop was in my wife sewed the bottom of the bag shut.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Next I inserted the vinyl tubing into the big hemmed pocket near the top of the bag. I joined the two ends together with the 1/2" plastic pipe nipple. My wife then sewed the slit shut in the big pocket that you have to make to insert the tubing. This tubing keeps the top of the bag floating. I then inserted some parachute cord through the double hemmed pocket at the top of the bag and put the cord stop on the ends of the parachute cord. This makes sure the bag stays closed and the gills stay in while its in the water.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Last of all I used some more parachute cord to apply handles and a tie cord to the bag. The bag works perfectly and the gills stay a lot livelier in the river than in a bucket. Plus, you don't have to listen to the aerator all night long.

    [​IMG]

    I looked at similar bags from Bass Pro for $40.00 and read reviews that said how crappy the quality of the bags were so I made my own. If I do say so myself it came out great. Thank God my wife can use a sewing machine.