My $500 project

Discussion in 'Boating' started by mobowhntr, Aug 10, 2008.

  1. mobowhntr

    mobowhntr New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Missouri
    I went and picked her up yesterday evening. It is a 1972 14' Kenner Ski Barge, 1972 Chrysler 35HP and 1972 Dilly Tilt trailer. The floor is really soft in a couple of places so I am going to have to cut it out and replace it. I was wondering if I could just take the console out for now and lay in a new floor on top of the existing rebolt the console and use it like that until I get the money for a complete rebuild?
     

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  2. mobowhntr

    mobowhntr New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Missouri
    The motor is in great shape, but it wont go into reverse every time. I don't know if it just needs an adjustment or what it is?
     

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  3. azcataholic

    azcataholic New Member

    Messages:
    1,384
    State:
    arizona
    looks like you got a deal with a motor that runs , and with a trailer. Good luck fishing.
     
  4. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Use it like it is.

    It won't be a bargain for very long if you start pouring cash into it.
     
  5. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    I had to completely rip mine out and start over on it. You can just cut and replace what is soft. Has it set outside forever? If so, I can tell you the foam they put in those skibarge's were more like sponges. When I took mine apart the foam was totally saturated and it had been under a shed for 10 years. you will lose several hundred pounds by just removing that foam and pouring new foam in it. I have a few hundred hours work into mine but I know whats in it. as for the reverse on the motor I would say an adjustment would probably take care of that. By the way, Welcome to the hood. :wink: Mac
     
  6. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    I guess you could do that, but dont put a 3/4" over it. it would be extremely heavy. I have been looking for a 20' skibarge for under a grand. but just havent run into one yet. I really like fishing in the skibarge, lots of room. I am sure you will enjoy yours.
     
  7. mobowhntr

    mobowhntr New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Missouri
    I was going to use 5/8, do you think that would be too heavy? It will only take 2 sheets to do the whole floor. It is only 12' long by 4'6" wide. I would also like to talk to you about doing the floor in detail when ever you have the time?
     
  8. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    How much punk is in the floor and where is it located? If it isnt too much I would think 3/8ths would be alright until you tear it down. as far as doing it, its just time consuming. I think somewhere in the archives is the thread to where I done mine, but I would be more than happy to talk with you about it. Does yours have a fiberglass cover over the wood on the floor?
     
  9. mobowhntr

    mobowhntr New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Missouri
    I would say the floor is pretty much gone. I went out there this evening and walked it over good and it's bad. Yes it does have the fiberglass over the wood and I think that is about all that's holding it together.
     
  10. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    yep, that is exactly the way mine was, Back when they built these boat on the production line they didnt think of one thing, moisture from humidity built up in that hull, that foam gets wet and stays that way, heats up and then attacks the underside of the plywood that they have covered in fiberglass. You could get by a season of two maybe by layin over it, but eventually if you want to keep the boat you will have to tear it down. They encapsulate the stringers with regular fiberglass mat and regular fiberglass , Fiberglass is not water proof and will leak, that is why they put a jell coat over fiberglass boats. Chances are your stringers will be rotted out also, and I would bet that your transome will be iffy. Mine is weak but not unusable. I plated on both side with aluminum to support the motor. The only way to make your boat last after a rebuild is to use quality stuff, I used a two part epoxy to saturate my plywood floors both sides, I also used the two part epoxy to saturate then reglass my stringers. I did away with the fiberglass cover all together and just paint it now and again with a porch paint with anti-slip (sand) added to it. I do have to repaint it at least twice a year in the wear areas, but its a small price to pay really. Once opened up the boat and cut the stringers out of thier capsilated fiberglass I let the boat air out for several weeks to insure it was indeed dry, meantime you can use the old stringers, (what is left) and use for patterns for new ones, make sure to saturate them good with the two part epoxy, a note on two part it will have what is called a blush, a waxy film that comes to the top after it cures, you have to remove this before adding more or attaching anything to it or it wont hold. There are several sites on boat building that will teach you how to deal with it. once your stringers are installed now is a good time to figure your wiring needs , where you will have wires running and so forth, its easier to put in wire chases now then later, pvc pipe works good for this. Then get the two part foam and pour it in, once it is done cookin, then you can take a hot wire or saw and make it level to the top of the stringers, this will be much better than the chunks of foam they just slapped in there. Now you can move on to your decking, once you have them cut and fitted, saturate them with two part epoxy, wipe off the blush, lay down some thickened epoxy to the stingers and lay the floor in, put finish nails to hold to the stringers. once cured, then lay fiberglass mat over your seams and along the edges to tie it all together. put a few more coats of resin on the floor let it cure and wipe the blush off. put your console back on, motor , wiring and take it fishin. It is alot of work, but the end product will be a boat you will probably never want to get rid of . and if ya do, just call me. I like those skibarges............ Hey I got a 14' flatbottom I'll trade ya and give ya some boot. :smile2: has a 15hp but it needs rings, also have a couple of 85 hp evinrudes..........LMAO.
     
  11. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    Also , Look up MarkJ on here, he is the go to guy for epoxy resins, he builds boats as a hobby and is a wealth of knowlege. :wink:
     
  12. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    If the floors are that bad I dont imagine the stringers are any better and will have to be replaced.

    Best advice I can give at this point is to change how you are looking at this boat.
    You need to look at it from the stand point of falling in love with a 55 chevy you just found with a tree growing through the hood.
    It costs what it costs to restore it.

    The guy that got the 500 bucks got the deal.
    Dont take me the wrong way, I'm just being honest about it.

    Is there wood in the transom? If so, it's probally shot too.
    Floors, stringer, transom repair, I'd budget 1200 dollars for it doing it myself the proper way.
    It's just like remodeling a living room. Once you tear into the living room you find that you just cant do just the living room because you got two doors in the living room leading to other rooms. Before you know it, a molding change or a wall modification has FORCED you into redoing the whole house.

    Got to be careful with buying these old boats. Its rare that you'll find one that old without structural problems caused by moisture. Even fiberglass itself can be waterlogged unknown unless you know what to look for.

    One last piece of advice. I wouldn't duct tape or bailing twine this job.
    The right way or dont spend a dime on it.
    Anything else would be halfway committing to a boat and it's going to treat you back the same way. Halfway.
     
  13. mobowhntr

    mobowhntr New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks Mark for chiming in. I plan on doing it right but it will be the first time I have done anything like this so I may have to ask a lot of questions. Also Jim how did you cut the fiberglass floor? How close to the hull did you go? Do you guys use the stuff you drill holes into the stringers and shoot it in there or just replace the boards?
     
  14. Wvawitrado

    Wvawitrado New Member

    Messages:
    463
    State:
    California, Fresno
    Hey guys just trying to help out here there is another website called iboats.com and they have loads of threads probably identical to your boat and they are spot on with responding to help like this I purchased "a deal" myself and they helped me along to keeping my budget down and FUN UP!!!! LOL I hope this helps
     
  15. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    I learned from Iboats too, and several other sites. I cut my floor with about 1" left sticking out, that way I had a lip to attach too. I used a regular grinder with a cutting wheel, make sure you wear a mask and goggles, or face mask used for wood working and would recommend long sleeve shirt buttoned tight. and baby powder, That glass will get in your in the pours of your skin and you will itch forever. If I would have had a painters suit I would have worn that :smile2: Just go slow, take your time. I have never used the stuff you pour in for wood rot, Dont know anything about it. I just cut the top off the stringers and worked the wood out. I might not have the name right, but I think a product called sea cast is used in transomes, this might work on stringers but you would have to investigate that and its uses. It just takes time . your in the good time of the year for glass work, I did mine in the winter and set up took a long time even with the Winter epoxy. Post with your progress and ask any questions, I would read for hours on repair sites, ask MarkJ questions , then formulated my plan, ordered my products and went to it. Some of my friends started callin my boat the USS NEVER SAIL, LMAO I worked on it for over 3 years, but it was in my spare time. If I had nothing else to do and the materials setting there it would have takin about a month for me. Of course Like you I was learning as I went, get the wrong mix with resin and you just bought a cup of hard coffee.............:eek:oooh: Its a fun learning experience to say the least, and in the end you have a boat to be proud of. Mac:cool2::wink:
     
  16. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I think he is talking about Git-Rot.
    My philosophy on rot is to git it out of there.

    While on the subject of rot did you know many wood boats are effected more by dry rot then wet rot? Wood can be too dry.

    FWMUD is getting ready to Seacast his transom.
    The hardest part about transom work is preparing for the Seacast.
    Digging out every piece of wood in the transom. Its a tight space to work and requires some home made tools I imagine.
    That is the option of using Seacast I would recomend to someone that lacks a background in glassing, glass repairs and some heavy knowledge into the engineered aspects of glass cloth.

    You go to cutting glass off a transom you better know what type of glass and how much to put back.
    I wouldn't do it.

    Somone mentioned earlier about saturated foam.
    FWMUD's boat was foamed with the wrong stuff. I laughed when I saw some of the green foam that came out of it. Yes it was a factory foam job! You see why I dont care for factory boats. They do all kinds of crap in places you cant see.
    Anyway I was present at the defoaming.
    Easily 1000 pounds, yes thats a 1/2 TON of foam was removed from his boat.
    Not counting the 5 or 6 large shop vacs that were filled with water.
    Must have been a big boat?
    No, this boat is a 16 footer!
     
  17. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    After reading various threads discussing foam over the past couple of years, I'm not at all sure I would put foam under a deck if I were doing a rebuild. Seems like a minefield.
     
  18. Little Mac

    Little Mac Active Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    State:
    NW Arkansa
    Todays foam is a far shot from what they did back in the 60s,70s,80s, back then they just cut blocks and put in there. Nowdays you can pour the stuff in it will expand to fill the cavity and is not suppose to take on water like "back in the Day". back then it wasnt even a closed cell foam, it was the same stuff they made coolers out of.
     
  19. mobowhntr

    mobowhntr New Member

    Messages:
    22
    State:
    Missouri
    Jim is there any way you can send me the URL to your rebuild thread? I searched and couldn't find it. Thanks
     
  20. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Closed cell foam itself has come a long way in the last decade.
    I like foam for a few reasons but each hull would dictate how and where I foamed.
    If I built the boat and was a self bailing boat the entire floor system would be sealed and the area under the floor filled to capacity with foam. No air pockets.
    Its sound deadening, somewhat softens the ride, and of course it floats the boat.
    If the entire bilge area is filled to capacity and you knock a 2 foot hole in the bottom of the boat you aren't in any danger of sinking much less taking on water. The foam will displace any water.
    There is no danger of the foam absorbing water because its a sealed construction.

    If it wasnt a self bailing boat and the floor system was not totally sealed to the hull I would opt for strategically placing foam where it wouldnt be effected by water intrusion or be in any danger of trapping water for any length of time.
    Closed cell foams I wouldnt say today will saturate because they wont but they are capable of some absorbtion of water. Nothing near like they used to.

    The foam itself is what you have shop just like anything else. The lesser foams have not neccesarily left the foam market.
    Buy from reputable suppliers and stick to the name brands.
    You may pay more then a house brand but the product is going to be better and atleast you have a name brand to place trust into.

    The biggest thing with redoing is documentation. Build a portfolio with detailed pictures and lots of them. Take photos of the epoxy jugs, the foam jugs, etc. ect.
    When you sell, this documentation will add value to the vessel and the portfolio goes with the boat and the new owner. It promotes buyer confidence in the product he is buying.