Moving my equipment

Discussion in 'Jims Woodworking' started by Patmansc, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,538
    State:
    Greer, SC
    Name:
    Pat Chaney
    Gentlemen, I would like to hear your opinions on the following: I will be moving my woodworking equipment from Denver to Greenville, and am concerned that the moving company will knock my table saw & jointer out of alignment (if not worse). I really don't want to have to re-align the beds again, but am pretty sure that something will happen. I have been giving serious thought to building shipping crates to protect them. I've already built a small crate for my 9" band saw out of scrap, but will need to purchase some 2x4's & plywood (1/4" or 1/2") for the bigger pieces. What do you think?
     
  2. screen

    screen New Member

    Messages:
    581
    State:
    Sterling, Illinois
    What is more costly? Creating or your time to realign?
     

  3. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    We moved from TX to AR, 650 miles by moving company.

    I never did a thing to my table saw and drill press. They packed them in the van like they were furniture. It arrived just like it was in TX. :)
     
  4. Larry

    Larry New Member

    Messages:
    707
    State:
    Minnesota
    make the crates or at least mount them on/to a pallet, Hopefully it will make it easier to handle.
     
  5. Phil Washburn

    Phil Washburn New Member

    Messages:
    7,680
    State:
    Shawnee OK
    well fer cryin out loud, Pat!!! :eek: you have saws and wood - make a crate!:D
     
  6. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,538
    State:
    Greer, SC
    Name:
    Pat Chaney
    Well hell's bells! Put it that way, kinda seems like a no-brainer! You know, I don't mind if they knock the crap out of the furniture, but not my tools!! The peace of mind is worth the time & whatever it may cost for wood/screws. Thanks, guys.
     
  7. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    You answered your own question, Pat. ;)
    Good luck with the moving. I know you'll be glad to get settled in.
     
  8. catsmith1

    catsmith1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    State:
    Haughton, Louisiana
    Pat,
    I understand how you feel about the trouble involved with aligning and properly setting up your equipment. If you are worried I would build a simple crate. There is nothing more annoing or dangerous than a messed up table saw.

    Last year at work the big cabinet grade table saw had been bumped by a forklift and no one bothered to tell anyone. I went out to build a oak table for our training room and my first cut launched a piece of 3/4 ply about 18x22 30 feet across the shop. Luckily I was a little to the left of dead center and it missed my gut by a inch or two.

    All that being said I would move it in some kinda container.
     
  9. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,538
    State:
    Greer, SC
    Name:
    Pat Chaney
    Thanks, Bob. I always try not to stand directly behind the blade, cause once I took a small piece of kickback right in the gut - it drew a little blood but mostly just scared the crap outta me. And another time a piece of kickback went right thu the sheetrock 3 feet behind the saw. I now maintain a tremendous respect for that tool.
     
  10. Jesse168

    Jesse168 Member

    Messages:
    247
    State:
    Memphis, Tennessee
    Ya making a mountain out of a mole hill !!!

    If you have any kind of machine savy you will know that whenever you move machinery you HAVE TO RELEVEL & REALIGN !

    The only reason for crating is to keep all parts together or to be able to move with fork lift. If damaged by mover they pay to have it repaired or replaced.

    Main thing is to make sure your property is insured while in transit with your insurance company as well as mover's insurance company...then you have 2 ways of making sure you don't loose out if something happens to your life's acumulation of keepsakes.
     
  11. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,538
    State:
    Greer, SC
    Name:
    Pat Chaney
    Hey Jesse - I'm not trying to make a mountain outta a mole hill! Problem is, I don't have a lot of machine savy :eek: In fact, sometimes I feel like I"m borderline "mentally challenged" when it comes to machinery. When I took those things out of the boxes, it took me days to get them set up and running right. Sounds like you may know your way around machines, some of us are not gifted in that way. But thanks for your input :)
     
  12. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Agree, about what I said in my post.

    The way I looked at it, I was hiring a professional moving company and buying moving insurance. It was their job to take care of packing, if there was damage they would pay.

    They never used a fork lift to move my saw. Three of them used a dolly, never had any problem handling it. The biggest problem for them was getting it down the steps to my shop here in AR.
     
  13. slabmaster

    slabmaster New Member

    Messages:
    719
    State:
    missouri
    i kinda think your going to have to do some millwright work when you get your tools to there new home. i use to travel the country installing cabinets and trim in kentucky fried chicken stores hauled tools all over Gods creation. you have to adjust a little here aand there.its not really my buissness but the more you know how to work on your equipment the more confidence you will have when you use it.
     
  14. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,538
    State:
    Greer, SC
    Name:
    Pat Chaney
    Rex, I agree with you 100%. Because of my previous work schedule, I never used my tools that much, so there is tons that I can learn. But thats changed now, and I will have lots more time to work with & get familiar with them.