More on blended fuel.

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by Bubbakat, Sep 5, 2007.

  1. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    OMC - BRP - Evinrude - Johnson - E-Tec - OMC Cobra -
    - Honda - Indmar - Mercury - Yamaha - Nissan - Pleasurecraft - Suzuki...




    Many Boat Owners, in recent years, have unknowingly used gas, blended with too high (unsafe) levels of ethanol alcohol. Running on gas with over 10 % alcohol in a marine engine will cause performance problems, and can also cause permanent damage to your marine motor.


    Understanding the dangers and effects of alcohol gas, in addition to following all the necessary marine fuel system precautions, is now necessary to avoid any problems with E10 gasoline.


    There has been much controversy, misinformation and confusion since the recent (2006) increased distribution of ethanol gasoline in the United States.


    Recent marketing gimmicks by some fuel additive product companies, have confused boaters even more. These ads falsely claim their new products can "fix" or repair ethanol water-contaminated fuel...Phase-separated fuel can not be fixed, and it must be discarded.

    Even high level, reputable government authorities, have recently published information that conflicts with previous articles and bulletins written years ago on ethanol.


    Marine manufacturer fuel recommendations (eg. owners manuals), which in the past, often warned against using alcohol fuels, now document that up to 10 % ethanol in gas is acceptable.


    As more people are using E10, the necessary precautions and dangers are becoming more apparent and better documented.


    Boaters looking for instant answers and solutions will not find them- But, increased knowledge and following all the necessary precautions can spare you from most of the inconvenience and problems with alcohol gas.




    All reputable authorities agree, that running on ethanol alcohol above 10 % will cause motor damage and/or performance issues with gas-powered engines, and it is always unsafe to run on contaminated fuel.
    Prevention is your best weapon against ethanol gas.
     
  2. fish

    fish Active Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    ChattanoogaTenn
    Willard, could you tell us which stations do not carry that kind of fuel so we won't goof up. I usually use Exxon gas and hope I am safe here. Thanks for the article buddy.
     

  3. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
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    Jim according to law they are suppose to mark it at the pumps to alert you to the E fuel. But there is no push to enforce this regulations at the retailer end. So what it doils down to is that we, you and I hope we don't run into it.where its not marked.
    I have a guy who is suppose to send me a testing kit so if and when I get it i'll post where we all as boaters can have access to one.
    One of the best guards you can use is the fuel water seperator and buying just enough gas to get you through your day of fun on the water.
     
  4. fish

    fish Active Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    ChattanoogaTenn
    Thanks Willard, I appreciate that buddy. I am going to pick up one of the separators soon, I never will run that full tank of gas out that's in my boat right now. I do have seafoam and stabil in it, maybe that will help.
     
  5. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Willard what happened to fill the tank and keep water from forming in the tank? I know mine stays full or about full all the time. Been doing that for 30 years.
    Not saying it right. But I never have any problem. But I do add Yamahlube or what every the stuff Yamaha makes for that reason in the 4-stroke Yamaha. But in the Suzuki it does now as for anything to be added. So I don't add anything to it. And Lord knows it sits way to long with fuel in the 18 gallon tank.
    So guess I need to add a fuel water separator and just run less fuel..
    Pete
     
  6. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    There is a lot of urban legend developing about ethanol so Diogenes search continues.One of the main problems with it, is it can dissolve some types of older fiberglass gas tanks.The resulting "Sludge" can clog carbs/injectors and cause damage to the engine.Fortunately newer gas tanks have solved this problem.The other major issue is alchohol attracts water,compounding the normal water problems associated with gasoline.Bubba has made the best recommendation ,which is to add a fuel/water separating filter between the tank and engine.I personally think the ethanol blend gasoline has a distinctive odor and have developed a good nose for it.Right now our refineries are switching over to the "Winter" fuel blends mandated in many states to reduce air pollution.If you live in a state that requires this you are going to get ethanol gas for the most part.Much good information has been written in the popular boating magazines and that info is free for the taking if you go to their websites and pull it up.Pay attention to what your owners manual says also.If you dont heed the warnings then you should practice your Boater in Distress hand and arm signals.!!!!!!:big_smile::smile2:
     
  7. Duckpoor

    Duckpoor New Member

    Messages:
    184
    State:
    Illinois
    I have for years run the premium fule available because I believed it made a difference in the small displacement motors we are forced to use on our lakes.
    I have noticed for the most part up till now it was alcohol free.
    Guess I am gonna have to put the readers on when I get to the pump from here on.
     
  8. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    Pete fuel has about a 90 day shelf life now and the old adage of keeping the tank full is still a good idea in my book. I would add extra seafoam for the full tanks and add a fuel water seperator. This will at least keep the water out of the motor and that is what we are after. I never have fogged my motors because I never let them set over 60 days but now after all this research and the E10 fuels coming our way I will be fogging mine when cold weather gets here.
    In the older engines I would keep a good eye on the rubber parts to make sure its not deterationg the rubber and causing leaks.
    I have got a couple good articles on here right now to give every one a heads up on this E10 and when they have run theire course in a couple days I have some more info to share and folks this info has come from some very extensive studies
    Duck poor if that engine is not designed for high octane fuel then all you have acheived over the years is a lotless money and running that motor a little hotter.

    Now don't be mislead with the e-10 fuel. It is a very clean fuel. It just loves water and has a short tank life.
     
  9. fish

    fish Active Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    ChattanoogaTenn
    OK, I am fixin to show my ignorance here (notice I didn't say stupidity) What is "fogging an engine"?
     
  10. Ol Man

    Ol Man New Member

    Messages:
    3,170
    State:
    Illinois
    What he said...
    __________
    A penny saved is a penny earned, and a penny spent, is a penny enjoyed.
     
  11. Bubbakat

    Bubbakat New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    McMinnvill
    You squirt oil inside a cylinder via the sparkplug hole to keep rust from forming on the walls and the pistons.
    If I am going to set one up for awhile then I run some mist oil thru the carbs to lube the inside then shut the engine down and pull plugs and fogg the cylinders. You can buy the fogging oil at any good marine store.
     
  12. fish

    fish Active Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    ChattanoogaTenn
    Thanks buddy, I appreciate you helping me overcome my ignorance. I bet you thought you had taught me better than that didn't you.LOL