Molds

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by shingman6, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. shingman6

    shingman6 New Member

    Messages:
    67
    State:
    South Carolini
    Does anybody know where I can buy a mold for 8 oz or 9oz no roll sinker.?
     
  2. iam2hi2flyinky

    iam2hi2flyinky New Member

    Messages:
    259
    State:
    kentucky
    i make my own molds out of clay but they turn out real crappie over 2 oz i would like to find a good 6 oz mold. when i cleaned out my dads basement for him found about 50 lbs of lead rods that melt down good i dont know if im not getting the lead hot enough or what but i cant make a good heavy weight mold for nothing
     

  3. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
  4. shingman6

    shingman6 New Member

    Messages:
    67
    State:
    South Carolini
    Thanks for the info!
     
  5. DemolitionMan

    DemolitionMan New Member

    Messages:
    442
    State:
    Tupelo, Mississippi
    Like AwShucks, I get my molds from Barlow's Tackle....Dwight
     
  6. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    The DO IT molds are available all over the place up to 8 oz only though. They are good quality and reasonably inexpensive.

    There is only one place in the country that I have been able to find BIGGER No-Roll Slip sinkers. That is Collins Customs.

    In fact, just got my brand-spankin' new one a few days ago with 3 cavities 8, 12, 16 oz. They make them bigger than that too.:eek:oooh:

    I plan on doing a review when I can find the time.

    They are really expensive. All I can say so far is that these are professionally done. Massive, heavy, and machined to tight tolerances.

    If you don't mind spending the money they have them.

    To me, the agony and pain of scrounging around, and making do with alternatives is not worth it. No one sells the big no rolls. Spend the money once then move on with your life.

    From there on after you can make your own. Ahhhhhh, the peace and tranquility!:cool2:
     
  7. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Been wanting to try making my own mold. Don't know much about moldmaking though.
    Where do you find the clay? Can you use plaster? How do you go about making the impression?
    How long do the molds last?
    Thats probably enough questions for now.
    thanks
    just
     
  8. Pennsylvaniacatchaser

    Pennsylvaniacatchaser Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,359
    State:
    Sarver, Pa
    A 16 oz. sinker! :crazy: Holy crap! :eek:oooh: Excuse my ignorance but where in the world would you use something like that not to mention the rod n reel you would need? I must say I'm fascinated by this post! :wink:
     
  9. iam2hi2flyinky

    iam2hi2flyinky New Member

    Messages:
    259
    State:
    kentucky
    i get my clay out of these ky creeks carveum out real smooth and have them fired at a pottery shop for 5$ i just got to drill my own holes in them and smooth that part up. but like i said when i tried makeing 3oz + sized they get bubbles in them and they are way to rough for my line. i could smooth them out but it takes 10 to 15 min to fill em in and smooth them out and thats not worth it but a make 2oz ones that look store bought. ill get better with time on the big ones i think im not getting my lead hot enough scared ill crack my clay molds but the ladie at the pottery shop said as thick as my plates are and that they are fired they should not .i just dont want to find out the hard way the mold takes a min to make now and my one works good but i dont want to waste alot of time doing these defeats the porpose. i will get some pics of mine from start to finish so u can c
     
  10. iam2hi2flyinky

    iam2hi2flyinky New Member

    Messages:
    259
    State:
    kentucky
    as far as the hole to pour the lead in i just copy a store bought one
     
  11. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    If you go through a lot of the heavy no-roll sinkers, it would probably pay to invest in an expensive mold, but if you only need to mold a couple of dozen each year, a cheaper mold, or even a homemade mold might be a better investment. No-rolls are some of the first sinkers my buddy and I poured, back in the mid-50s. We couldn't afford a mold, so we had to improvise to make our sinkers. The no-rolls were made by using different size spoons, filled to different levels, and allowed to cool. Out popped a no-roll sinker, ready to drill a hole in the small end. And don't forget those great big long-handled BBQ spoons for those really big sinkers. Another type of no-roll, the claw, which has 3 or 4 metal fingers coming out of the bottom to grab and hold it in place can be made with a special mold for that purpose, or you can simply use an egg sinker mold as is, or make a slight modification to a bell sinker mold. And most halfway competent machinists can make a halfway decent mold out of a couple of blocks of aluminum and a good hinge.
     
  12. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    I have the mold which includes a 16 ounce bank sinker. Used it in the Chesapeake Bay... when the tide was running, I still couldn't grab bottom. LOL There is no place in Oklahoma to use them, but the do make good conversation pieces. LOL
     
  13. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl
    Mississippi River, Missouri river. It can rock and roll at times! Especially near and in the tailwaters below dams. Around the ends of wing dikes etc.... Sometimes you just need 'em

    I can't wait to pour a couple and try em.
     
  14. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    When fishing in fast water, you need a big sinker to hold your bait where you want it.The Ohio, Mississippi, Missouri and, other large rivers at times can be extremely fast and hard to manage, even away from the tailwaters. I have seen the time (in the winter) that, it took 20+oz to hold your bait down in the Ohio. Fishing for blues in that kind of current is a challenge but very rewarding at times.
     
  15. kingneck76

    kingneck76 New Member

    Messages:
    334
    State:
    Jeff City MO
    2hy2flyinky you may not have your mold warm enough when you pour. that would cause bubbles, and the sinker comes out looking odd shaped. what happens is the lead cools right when it hits the sides of your mold. causeing bubbles, and odd shapes. so to fix that problem, and the worry about cracking them warm it up. just use a colmen stove or something. it dont have to be red hot. as this will make the sinker take forever to solidify. hope that helps. also i have never tried making no rolls, but i have made pyramids. got the biggest one i could find, and made a impression out of bondo. then i just messed around, and found how full to fill the mold for different weights. hard part is holding the eyelet centered while it gets hard.
     
  16. AfterTheBiguns

    AfterTheBiguns New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Missouri
    We use 16oz bank sinkers when we are snaggin spoonies. We need them to keep the line on bottom when we are trolling.
     
  17. kscathunter

    kscathunter New Member

    Messages:
    2,367
    State:
    Louisburg,
    i know it sounds like it would just burn up but it looks like it will work. i got a couple good sinkers for my first try, and the mold didnt burn up even though the lead took forever to get solid. i traced a 5oz no roll on a 2x4 used a router to cut it out till the 5oz fit depth wise in the wood coppied it made the pour hole and pin holes and got a useable roughly 12oz no roll. after this 1st shot to see what happens i was inpressed and see potintial in this plan. a smaller spout some cleaner straighter cuts and some plaining of the 2x4 to make it smooth so i get less flash and i think i got an exelent CHEEP big no roll mold. heres a pic of my first try.
     

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  18. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Cool.
    Can you please post a pix of the mold?
     
  19. Ketch

    Ketch New Member

    Messages:
    469
    State:
    Minnesota
    First off, I hope everyone making their own weights is being very cautious since lead isn't the most pleasant thing to work with. Make sure you work in an open, well ventilated area since the fumes coming off of the melting is very bad for you. Second, make sure you clean up good after making them, this especially applies to smokers. You don't want to light up with the lead residue still all over your hands, its giving the carcinogens a direct route into your blood stream. Okay, enough on safety.

    Eric, if you have a picture or 2 on what your "bad" sinker looks like, I could definitely help diagnose your problem. I have been in the foundry industry for quite a few years, and have begun doing some consulting with other foundries related to defect analysis. Most times, looking at the casting will allow you to determine what went wrong.

    Some of the things critical to pouring good sinkers:

    Good hot molds. Normally, if you are going to pour a lot of lead at one time, just pour through 1 or 2 pieces that you know will be bad and this will allow the mold to heat up properly. The mold also needs to be heated evenly so that cooling occurs properly. Also, as you get to thicker section sizes, they will cool more slowly and stay liquid longer. You always want your pouring basin to cool last (the spot you pour into) since all metal shrinks when it solidifies. This will allow the hot, liquid lead from the pouring basin to "pipe" in to accommodate shrinkage.

    Steady pour. Your lead should be poured at the fastest rate your pouring basin will allow you to pour without spilling and it needs to be steady. Any interuptions will cause a skin to appear and cause a bad sinker to be made. Most often, you will see a really shiny area, and then a definite crease if this is your problem. Also, when pouring, you should not pour directly into the hole in the pouring basis. Pour onto the pouring cup (the flange in the hole you pour into). This allows gases to escape and not become trapped inside the mold.

    Lead temperature. Lead melts at a little over 600 degrees, but shouldn't be poured that cool. If lead is poured too cold, you will get creases in your pour similar to the interrupted pour (see above). The exact temperature depends on a lot of variables but you should be able to pour 3-4 molds worth easily without creating much skin on your ladle.

    Clean metal. Make sure you heat your lead up good and hot and skim all the slag off of the top before molding, otherwise its going to leave impurities in your sinker.

    Hope this isn't too technical and makes some sense.
     
  20. Ketch

    Ketch New Member

    Messages:
    469
    State:
    Minnesota
    Brandon, you may want to try taking a torch to your mold. Don't burn it, just make sure you leave a black surface. The carbon residue you are leaving will improve surface appearance as well as make it slicker for easy removal.