Molding sinkers?

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by daniel-delarosa, Mar 29, 2007.

  1. daniel-delarosa

    daniel-delarosa New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    seminole, oklahoma
    I recently bought a few molds and a LEE production melter. I need some tips on getting my sinkers to look right. In my big mold (2oz to 5oz) and my ingot mold, I can see layers, it looks like the lead was drying too fast. In my small mold(1/4oz to 1oz) I'm only getting partial sinkers. I thought the lead was coming out too slow so i drilled out the spout the lead is released from. BIG MISTAKE! My drill bit came out of the spout and right into the heating element,lol. Luckly a new element was 10 bucks.
    One guy said to get a hot plate and set my molds on it to keep them hot. Would that work?
     
  2. dankitch

    dankitch New Member

    Messages:
    468
    State:
    Henderson,
    It would help to keep your molds hot. The main problem you are having is your lead is cooling too fast. Weather it is cold molds or your lead is not getting hot enough.
     

  3. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Sounds like your pot needs to be turned up a bit!!!
    I tend to make my first pour and let it stay in the mold, do not open it for a few minutes (even if it didn't pour right). This will let the lead get the mold hot, repeat this process until the mold is hot enough to make a good pour!!! I would never put one of my molds on a hotplate, they cost to much to warp them right off the bat!!!
     
  4. daniel-delarosa

    daniel-delarosa New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    seminole, oklahoma

    I thought the same thing about warping and the cost of replacing a mold.
    I started at 650 degrees and ended up at 900 degrees. how hot do you get your lead?
     
  5. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma


    Yep what JW said
     
  6. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    I don't have a way of measuring temperature because I use a cast iron pot to melt in. But the book says that lead will melt at 621 degrees and if you are using soft or almost pure lead you should be able to pour good looking sinkers in the 700 - 800 degree range.
     
  7. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,758
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    the guys are rite about the lead cooling to fast.that causes the layerd look and short pours.900 sounds about rite on temp.just keep pouring and your mold will heat up and then when it gets to hot let stand empty for a while.rember to oil your mold at the hinges before and after each use.if you are pouring slip sinkers oil your wire as well.
     
  8. Arkansascatman777

    Arkansascatman777 New Member

    Messages:
    7,782
    State:
    AR
    Here is the trouble shooting guide off of do-it-molds web site. This should help.

    Trouble Shooting:
    CASTING PROBLEM DIAGNOSIS GUIDE

    PROBLEM SOLUTION
    Casting Incomplete 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,11,12,or 13
    Flash Around Castings 6,8
    Inserts Do Not Fit 6
    Pull Pin Rod Difficult to Remove 9,10
    Castings Look Wrinkled 1,2,3,4,7,12,or 13
    1. Allow lead to heat longer before using.
    2. Pre-heat mold by making several castings without inserts.
    3. Pour a fine stream of lead directly into the cavity gate. Do not flood the sprue or fail to pour directly into the gate.
    4. Some electric units will not heat lead to maximum temperature when completely full. Try with only 1/2 full.
    5. Spinner-jig wire form and hook eye must be in the cavity center to fill properly.
    6. Wrong insert - check specifications.
    7. Try a different lead alloy (see instructions). Wheel weight or tire weight metal is the cause of many molding problems.
    8. Foreign object on the surface of the mold prevents it from closing tightly. Look for small specks of lead or other particles. Remove by carefully scraping away with a knife. Just remove the particle, not the surface of the mold.
    9. Oil pin lightly or smoke with carbon soot before first use.
    10. Remove rod quickly before the solidifying lead shrinks and grips the pin.
    11. Air trapped inside cavity. This can occur with a new, very tight mold. Test by placing a small piece of paper between the surfaces of the mold. A small corner of an adhesive label or gummed paper, like the seal on an envelope or corner of a postage stamp, will serve very well for this purpose by temporarily adhering to the molds’ surface. The paper will not allow the mold to close absolutely tight, and this small gap will permit air to escape from the cavity. If complete castings are obtained, leave the paper in place until the mold is broken in (usually 100-200 castings) and then remove it.
    12. Lead is not entering the cavity fast enough and lead is cooling too soon. Clean pour spout on bottom pour furnace. Large cavities may require ladle pouring to fill fast enough. Pour quickly.
    13. Smoke the mold cavities by positioning them just above a candle’s flame. A thin coat of black carbon soot will form which will help the flow of molten lead into the cavities and also make it easier to remove the cast lead parts
     
  9. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    I use a turkey frier and a 10qt dutch oven to melt my lead with, I pour it with a ladle directly into the mold. I have seen the lead get a redish tint to it on occasion (which is a signal to turn down the flame, LOL) This lead pours real well but can get your mold to hot and it will take a while for the lead to cool enough to take from the mold!!!
     
  10. badkarma

    badkarma New Member

    Messages:
    772
    State:
    Oxford,Miss
    I've had a Lee production pot for 25 years and I never turn it up past half way and for a long time I was melting and casting 75 lbs of lead a month.I don't remember what the melting temp of lead is but I know it's only a little above 500deg.and I have seen guys burn out the heating element by running the heat on high at all times.Your mold is cold and you need to cast a few weights till it heats up and just remelt the bad sinkers.I've cast many many 1000s of bulletts and sinkers using all types of molds with no problems (even scrap 2x4s with 3/4 holes bored in it and pore the hole full of lead and stick a twist of wire in the lead to tie the fishing line to)
     
  11. kdm75

    kdm75 New Member

    Messages:
    29
    State:
    north carolina
    I dont think you need another burner just let the mold sit slightly open on top of your burner while it heating up this will help the mold get hot (this is what was on the do it mold cd that came with my kit) but any ways you have to get the temp up on the mold. You can just keep pouring the sinkers and just throw the bad ones back in the pot. Just keep puring them it will get it right with enuff lead being pourd in. But on the other hand if you are going at a fast pace your mold can get to hot and you will have to let the sinkers stay in there longer. keep a eye on the pour holes you can see when the lead gets solid enuff to empty out.
     
  12. daniel-delarosa

    daniel-delarosa New Member

    Messages:
    392
    State:
    seminole, oklahoma
    Thanks ya'll!! This info will help me out.